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  • #31
    Another bit of a reorg in my department today. When I first started in this group many years ago, the Meeting & Events groups were part of our department. We had a reorg about 10 years ago and they broke up our Corporate Communications Dept and that team moved under Procurement (which I thought was idiotic). Anyway, within the last year, they moved back to our department. I've worked with this group a lot, know many of them and I always said that was one group I would want to go to if I ever left my current job. In fact, I thought if my position was ever eliminated, my first call would be to this one person who is a team lead and ask her about being a contractor. Today, she was the only person in that whole group that was let go and her direct reports moved into our Creative Services Group to be regular project managers and not fully work on the meetings and events. One of the women on her team called me this morning - she is so upset. She had her position downgraded. And my belief is that the team they are now on has too many people so it would not surprise me if they let some of them go in a few months. Ugh.

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    • #32
      I ask this as someone who has never really worked in a White Collar environment outside of my internship right after graduation:

      Would you likely be at risk for discipline if you were to say "No" to working in this manner?

      I understand the push to get away from being 24/7, but how feasible is this in reality without consequences from an employer?

      I can also understand the "traveling worker". A slightly different time than now, but in 2021 I dated a woman for a couple of months and the reason we couldn't work things out ultimately was that she was only realistically had to "work" 20-25 hours/week, and that was fully remote. And since her job was so lax, she would always want to be doing something "fun". It was totally normal to have her do work while flying out to her condo in South FL or off to visit friends out on the East Coast. She was doing the job, but never had to be anywhere specific to do it, so she took full advantage of that.
      It's never too early to start the Pre-game festivities

      Go Cats!!! GO BLACKHAWKS!

      Cuck the Fubs... Let's Go WHITE SOX!!!

      Wildcat Born, Wildcat Bred....

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      • #33
        Originally posted by RaceBoarder View Post
        I ask this as someone who has never really worked in a White Collar environment outside of my internship right after graduation:

        Would you likely be at risk for discipline if you were to say "No" to working in this manner?

        I understand the push to get away from being 24/7, but how feasible is this in reality without consequences from an employer?

        I can also understand the "traveling worker". A slightly different time than now, but in 2021 I dated a woman for a couple of months and the reason we couldn't work things out ultimately was that she was only realistically had to "work" 20-25 hours/week, and that was fully remote. And since her job was so lax, she would always want to be doing something "fun". It was totally normal to have her do work while flying out to her condo in South FL or off to visit friends out on the East Coast. She was doing the job, but never had to be anywhere specific to do it, so she took full advantage of that.
        I did my best to separate work from life. And while I got flak for some of what I did, none of it was a serious problem- as my reply would more often than not be "how does that make me a more effective worker?"

        I'm not saying that I didn't work some really weird hours- more than once I did the midnight shift because my car was being tested between 12am and 7am. And on trips, you had to take advantage of the weather situation you were given- so if a car cooled down in 8 hours, you did a start every 8 hours. But that was not regular at all. And as long as I got my work done, I didn't have a boss that expected that I would work every single weekend and up until 8pm. Maybe I was lucky?

        I do think, however, that the constant pressure to be working is the fast track to burnout, let alone really unhappy workers with crappy productivity. I was called exactly once in 30 years while on vacation. And I only answered it because I was mad at a contractor who was trying to get away with bending data in their favor.

        5 weeks of actual vacation should be required so that workers can really be able to focus on what they are doing. And I do really think vacation should be required. I was up to 7 when I was done working (paying for 2 of them), in addition to the ~2 weeks that the UAW got us. As far as I can tell, I always got my work done on time, and done really well. (the only time I didn't was when other team members really just wanted me to be a data monkey, which they were fully capable of doing themselves)

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        • #34
          If you get your work done, most employers wouldn't bat an eye. Cover core hours, which is usually like 10-2 or something like that.
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          • #35
            Originally posted by RaceBoarder View Post
            I ask this as someone who has never really worked in a White Collar environment outside of my internship right after graduation:

            Would you likely be at risk for discipline if you were to say "No" to working in this manner?

            I understand the push to get away from being 24/7, but how feasible is this in reality without consequences from an employer?

            I can also understand the "traveling worker". A slightly different time than now, but in 2021 I dated a woman for a couple of months and the reason we couldn't work things out ultimately was that she was only realistically had to "work" 20-25 hours/week, and that was fully remote. And since her job was so lax, she would always want to be doing something "fun". It was totally normal to have her do work while flying out to her condo in South FL or off to visit friends out on the East Coast. She was doing the job, but never had to be anywhere specific to do it, so she took full advantage of that.
            It varies. When I was a state employee I only took work home when absolutely necessary - prep for a hearing coming up, finishing an order needing to be issued by a statutory deadline, etc. Otherwise I was out the door at 4:30 and wouldn't do work until 8 am the next workday.

            Now that I'm with a firm, I still try to leave work at the office as much as possible but since my pay is at least partially linked to my billable hours, I end up doing some work at home just to make sure I stay close to hitting the target for the month/quarter. My firm is good to the extent it's not BigLaw hours requirements, but it's still always in the back of your head trying to hit 6 billable hours each workday, or more if you need to make some up. And some clients are asses and make unreasonable deadlines that can only be met by working ridiculous hours.

            So I will be doing some work from my parents this weekend since I've slacked off during the week. Not a ton, but more than I'd do if I was still a state employee with paid vacation (which would be none). And it's my own fault, had I done more work yesterday and today, I wouldn't have to do more this weekend.

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            • #36
              Today alone:

              Been slapped 4 times.
              Had a stuffed animal bounced off my head.
              Been screamed at because they want thing it's not time for NOW.
              Had a door opened on my arm.

              And it's all: meh. I'm used to it by now.
              Facebook: bcowles920 Instagram: missthundercat01
              "One word frees us from the weight and pain of this life. That word is love."- Socrates
              Patreon for exclusive writing content
              Adventures With Amber Marie

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              • #37
                Originally posted by RaceBoarder View Post
                I ask this as someone who has never really worked in a White Collar environment outside of my internship right after graduation:

                Would you likely be at risk for discipline if you were to say "No" to working in this manner?

                I understand the push to get away from being 24/7, but how feasible is this in reality without consequences from an employer?

                I can also understand the "traveling worker". A slightly different time than now, but in 2021 I dated a woman for a couple of months and the reason we couldn't work things out ultimately was that she was only realistically had to "work" 20-25 hours/week, and that was fully remote. And since her job was so lax, she would always want to be doing something "fun". It was totally normal to have her do work while flying out to her condo in South FL or off to visit friends out on the East Coast. She was doing the job, but never had to be anywhere specific to do it, so she took full advantage of that.
                My employer has a very significant presence in California. Another company there was sued for violation of some employment law or another some 18 years ago, and that changed how my company classified hourly vs. salary employees. Essentially, if you’re a manager or in an assistant manager-like role, you’re salaried. I’m not in that sort of role, so I work my 40 most weeks and that’s it. I’ll receive a quick text every so often that’ll require 5 minutes, and I’ll help then, but it is rare. Some weekends are surrendered for big installs or BCP failover/failback testing events, and I’m paid OT for them. Those happen 2-3 times each year.
                "The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." George Orwell, 1984

                "One does not simply walk into Mordor. Its Black Gates are guarded by more than just Orcs. There is evil there that does not sleep, and the Great Eye is ever watchful. It is a barren wasteland, riddled with fire and ash and dust, the very air you breathe is a poisonous fume." Boromir

                "Good news! We have a delivery." Professor Farnsworth

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                • #38
                  My agency is also having me start with CLS (community living support) work next week because they need the help. And there are families ready to begin ASAP.

                  Apparently, my career chip has been implanted, and my career is working with individuals intellectual and developmental disabilities, Herding Cats division.
                  Facebook: bcowles920 Instagram: missthundercat01
                  "One word frees us from the weight and pain of this life. That word is love."- Socrates
                  Patreon for exclusive writing content
                  Adventures With Amber Marie

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by unofan View Post

                    It varies. When I was a state employee I only took work home when absolutely necessary - prep for a hearing coming up, finishing an order needing to be issued by a statutory deadline, etc. Otherwise I was out the door at 4:30 and wouldn't do work until 8 am the next workday.

                    Now that I'm with a firm, I still try to leave work at the office as much as possible but since my pay is at least partially linked to my billable hours, I end up doing some work at home just to make sure I stay close to hitting the target for the month/quarter. My firm is good to the extent it's not BigLaw hours requirements, but it's still always in the back of your head trying to hit 6 billable hours each workday, or more if you need to make some up. And some clients are asses and make unreasonable deadlines that can only be met by working ridiculous hours.

                    So I will be doing some work from my parents this weekend since I've slacked off during the week. Not a ton, but more than I'd do if I was still a state employee with paid vacation (which would be none). And it's my own fault, had I done more work yesterday and today, I wouldn't have to do more this weekend.
                    The thing I found difficult working a smaller firm doing mostly litigation was vacations. A solid week was very difficult, before, during, and after. Being eventually able to work remotely helps, but it also ups the ante and the client's expectations (and opponents' mischief). But I had three kids I made a high priority, and the people who hired me understood that. BigLaw was definitely not for me, and I think being and older law grad helped me understand that. Still, it remains true that the Law is a jealous mistress.

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                    • #40
                      I have to fire a senior manager for sexual harassment. Well technically HR will be delivering the message but I was the one that started the investigation process.

                      Turns out the bastard (married with 2 kids) had had 2 previous relationships with employees and now was in the middle of a 3rd.

                      I don't know if I'm more upset with myself for not figuring it out earlier or with him for being such a creepy dumbass.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by MissThundercat View Post
                        Today alone:

                        Been slapped 4 times.
                        Had a stuffed animal bounced off my head.
                        Been screamed at because they want thing it's not time for NOW.
                        Had a door opened on my arm.

                        And it's all: meh. I'm used to it by now.
                        What kind of job is that? I really hope it's well-paid. If not, consider reaching out to wonderlic customer service to explore better opportunities. Life's too short to spend hours in a job you don't enjoy. Besides, finding a fulfilling career can make a significant difference in your overall happiness and well-being. It's worth taking the time to explore your options and pursue something that truly resonates with you
                        Last edited by alicestevens; 04-18-2024, 02:53 PM.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post
                          I have to fire a senior manager for sexual harassment. Well technically HR will be delivering the message but I was the one that started the investigation process.

                          Turns out the bastard (married with 2 kids) had had 2 previous relationships with employees and now was in the middle of a 3rd.

                          I don't know if I'm more upset with myself for not figuring it out earlier or with him for being such a creepy dumbass.
                          I've been in that position and wondered the same about myself. I think women have creepy dumbass radar that works pretty well.

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                          • #43
                            Update from the recruiting inquiry I got a few weeks back. Ended up going through the whole process, had the final round interview today, and impressed them. This company is a bigger shop and not a pure-play firm, so I don't expect the culture to be the same, but from what I've gathered it's decent. Now we see if I'm really their guy, or if another candidate is cheaper.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post
                              Update from the recruiting inquiry I got a few weeks back. Ended up going through the whole process, had the final round interview today, and impressed them. This company is a bigger shop and not a pure-play firm, so I don't expect the culture to be the same, but from what I've gathered it's decent. Now we see if I'm really their guy, or if another candidate is cheaper.
                              I'm not sure about your industry, but I have hired a bunch of people who were more expensive. I just went to my seniors and said "(the more expensive candidate) is the more cost-effective person. They'll fix or avoid problems we'd have to hire others to deal with."

                              If your leadership can't handle that logic, leave.
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                              • #45
                                Working in a ground level, blue collar environment does have it's perks.

                                This past week we had the sh*t hit the fan and had three employees on our afternoon shift let go. The reason: Two for having cell phones on the floor and the 3rd for having ear buds in while on the floor. To make things even dumber, the ear bud person was discovered when they got called into the office for a different disciplinary write-up, and when removing their hat/baclava for the meeting (I'm in a refrigerated/freezer warehouse), their earbud fell out right in front of the supervisor.

                                It's made blatantly clear that possession of an electronic device on the floor is prohibited for safety reasons. It's a "Fireable on the spot" type offense, so the actions here are basically expected.

                                Where the comedy comes in is that we've actually gone a decent spell without one of these firings happening and people were getting more and more bold with this stuff. Especially during the 2nd half of the NFL season and March Madness, many of our "Dude-Bro Sports Gamblers" were constantly following scores while working. So they've clearly become emboldened with this.

                                And now those same people are all sorts of worked up over the firings and the idea that spot checks (basically you're called and asked to produce your phone from your locker/lunch bag or you get wanded by a metal detector to show its not on you). It's hilarious and I'm just laughing in their faces and enjoying every second of all the drama this has stirred up.

                                It's like the guy who always does 85-90mph on the expressway complaining about getting pulled over for speeding.
                                It's never too early to start the Pre-game festivities

                                Go Cats!!! GO BLACKHAWKS!

                                Cuck the Fubs... Let's Go WHITE SOX!!!

                                Wildcat Born, Wildcat Bred....

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