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Business, Economics, and Taxes: Eat Cereal for Dinner

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Capitalism in one story.

    Resident Stijn Oude Vrielink, originally from the Netherlands, said he was at home on a Monday night when his neighbor came to his door and suffered a cardiac arrest.

    He immediately called emergency services and then searched online for how to resuscitate a patient in order to help the woman.

    But, after clicking a link on YouTube, he was forced to sit through 18 seconds of adverts before being shown how to help the patient.

    He told local newspaper Algemeen Dagblad, translated from his native language Dutch into English: 'Every second counts when it comes to saving someone's life.

    'And those 18 seconds were damn long, I can tell you. All I could think was: Why now!'

    After a few minutes, he was able to initiate CPR until then the ambulance arrived. The woman was taken to hospital but later died.

    Leave a comment:


  • Swansong
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Price the derps out of Boston. Higher property tax revenues for services. I see no downside.

    There's always Worcester.
    Worcester is one of the fastest growing small cities in the country (or fastest growing property values?) over the past 5 years. I grew up here and moved out with college and moved back late 2020, and it's barely recognizable. It's a legit cool city at this point. In 3.5 years my property value is up something like 35-40%, and the city is building and building and building.

    Leave a comment:


  • LynahFan
    replied
    Originally posted by unofan View Post

    You almost have to assume the "max drop rate" lasted a mere fraction of a second, because the plane wouldn't just drop and then climb instantaneously. When the plan bottomed out at 400 feet, it would've been pulling up and out of the dive/descent, so the point of maximum drop rate had to have happened higher up.

    Also, since it sounds like it occurred during a missed approach/aborted landing, it could've been descending anyway and the error may have only dropped the plane more/faster than it would've otherwise gone, depending where on the aborted landing the error took place. Point being, there's a lot we simply don't know from what's presented in the article (not watching the video linked, maybe it contains more details), but the article definitely uses the scariest numbers to titilate rather than inform.
    Right - it's not the speed (descent rate, in this case) that kills you, it's the acceleration. 4000 ft/min is nothing in the grand scheme - that's a nice, leisurely 10-minute descent from 40,000 ft. That's well within the capability of ANY commercial (or military) aircraft out there. The potential issue is that if you're descending at 4,000 fpm, realize that you're about to hit the water, and yank back on the stick so that 0.5 seconds later you're at 0 fpm (holding steady at 400 ft), then you've put the aircraft through an acceleration (averaging) 4000 ft/min * 1 min/60 sec / 0.5 sec / (32.2 ft/sec/sec) = 4.1 G.

    Now, 4Gs is not comfortable - that's in the range of the biggest, fastest roller coasters out there. But it's certainly not life threatening nor would it cause any structural issues for the aircraft. Gusts and turbulence can easily cause momentary 4G accelerations, so the structure would have been designed to handle that.

    Bottom line, that rookie pilot probably just thought he saw a whale or something and wanted a closer look. What's the big deal?

    Leave a comment:


  • unofan
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    If it was falling 4,000 feet per minute and dropped to 400 feet then it was 6 seconds from impact.

    If it was falling 4,000 feet per minute and dropped to 20,000 feet then began to level off to where it eventually reached 400 feet, then it wasn't in any danger of impact at all.

    It actually sounds like the plane itself was a brave little toaster not to turn into a brick when it went into that dive. I'm guessing that's not within the tolerance levels of normal testing.
    You almost have to assume the "max drop rate" lasted a mere fraction of a second, because the plane wouldn't just drop and then climb instantaneously. When the plan bottomed out at 400 feet, it would've been pulling up and out of the dive/descent, so the point of maximum drop rate had to have happened higher up.

    Also, since it sounds like it occurred during a missed approach/aborted landing, it could've been descending anyway and the error may have only dropped the plane more/faster than it would've otherwise gone, depending where on the aborted landing the error took place. Point being, there's a lot we simply don't know from what's presented in the article (not watching the video linked, maybe it contains more details), but the article definitely uses the scariest numbers to titilate rather than inform.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Stop the Steal: another good reason to keep Biden and the Dems in power and kneecap the fasc.

    The IRS plans to end a major tax loophole for wealthy taxpayers that could raise more than $50 billion in revenue over the next decade, the U.S. Treasury Department says.

    The guidance and ruling being announced Monday includes plans to essentially stop “partnership basis shifting" — a process by which a business or person can move assets among a series of related parties to avoid paying taxes.

    Biden administration officials said after evaluating the practice that there are no economic grounds for these transactions, with Deputy Treasury Secretary Wally Adeyemo calling it “really just a shell game.” The officials said the additional IRS funding provided through the 2022 Inflation Reduction Act had enabled increased oversight and greater awareness of the practice.

    “These tax shelters allow wealthy taxpayers to avoid paying what they owe," IRS commissioner Danny Werfel said.

    Due to previous years of underfunding, the IRS had cut back on the auditing of wealthy individuals and the shifting of assets among partnerships and companies became common.

    The IRS says filings for large pass-through businesses used for the type of tax avoidance in the guidance increased 70% from 174,100 in 2010 to 297,400 in 2019. However, audit rates for these businesses fell from 3.8% to 0.1% in the same time frame.

    Treasury said in a statement announcing the new guidance that there is an estimated $160 billion gap between what the top 1% of earners likely owe in taxes and what they pay.
    The best description of Republican campaign contributions I even heard was "spending millions to steal billions."

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by unofan View Post
    So it dropped 200 feet at a rate of 4,000 feet per minute. 200 feet/4000 feet/minute = 2/40 = 1/20 of a minute * 60 seconds/ minute = 3 seconds, assuming the entire drop was at that rate. If you assume the max drop rate was only a blip before it was corrected, you're probably still only looking at a 5-8 second dive, the latter part of which would've been a slowing descent as the plane pulled up out of the dive.

    Not good by any means, but I think some context would make it seem less scary. It's not like it fell from 10,000 feet to 400.
    If it was falling 4,000 feet per minute and dropped to 400 feet then it was 6 seconds from impact.

    If it was falling 4,000 feet per minute and dropped to 20,000 feet then began to level off to where it eventually reached 400 feet, then it wasn't in any danger of impact at all.

    It actually sounds like the plane itself was a brave little toaster not to turn into a brick when it went into that dive. I'm guessing that's not within the tolerance levels of normal testing.

    Leave a comment:


  • unofan
    replied
    Originally posted by St. Clown View Post
    I would think it’s a good business policy to have a properly trained flight staff…
    Flight tracking data from ADS-B Exchange shows the plane dropping at a rate of more than 4,000 feet per minute while only 600 feet above sea level. The Boeing 737 Max 8 flew as low as 400 feet before rapidly climbing.
    So it dropped 200 feet at a rate of 4,000 feet per minute. 200 feet/4000 feet/minute = 2/40 = 1/20 of a minute * 60 seconds/ minute = 3 seconds, assuming the entire drop was at that rate. If you assume the max drop rate was only a blip before it was corrected, you're probably still only looking at a 5-8 second dive, the latter part of which would've been a slowing descent as the plane pulled up out of the dive.

    Not good by any means, but I think some context would make it seem less scary. It's not like it fell from 10,000 feet to 400.

    Leave a comment:


  • St. Clown
    replied
    I would think it’s a good business policy to have a properly trained flight staff…

    A federal investigation is underway after a Southwest Airlines flight plunged toward the ocean off the coast of Hawaii. The incident occurred on April 11 but only came to light publicly on Friday after Bloomberg reported Southwest sent a memo to pilots about the incident. Bloomberg reported the memo indicated a "newer" first officer was flying at the time and inadvertently pushed forward on the control column. The Boeing 737 Max 8 flew as low as 400 feet before rapidly climbing, flight tracking data shows. In a brief statement to CNN, Southwest acknowledged the incident but did not address the memo or why the incident took place.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slap Shot
    replied

    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    The glove compartment gets me every time!
    The Home Alone like face when the tailgate closes.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    All that tech to use a pull string to fix the issue. I like when calls it a "secret door" or whatever...Cybertruck owners are so stupid. There is a great v8deo where a mom mocks one of the mommy influencer types talking about how helpful the CT is in all the same ways a station wagon is.
    My mustang had more cargo capacity.

    Leave a comment:


  • aparch
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    The glove compartment gets me every time!
    I don't know how that mom held it together so we'll spoofing it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Drew S. View Post
    Price the derps out of Boston. Higher property tax revenues for services. I see no downside.

    There's always Worcester.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    The glove compartment gets me every time!

    Leave a comment:


  • aparch
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    There is a great video where a mom mocks one of the mommy influencer types talking about how helpful the CT is in all the same ways a station wagon is.
    https://www.tiktok.com/t/ZTNe87wVE/

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    All that tech to use a pull string to fix the issue. I like when calls it a "secret door" or whatever...Cybertruck owners are so stupid. There is a great v8deo where a mom mocks one of the mommy influencer types talking about how helpful the CT is in all the same ways a station wagon is.

    Leave a comment:

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