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Business, Economics, and Taxes: Eat Cereal for Dinner

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  • Handyman
    replied
    Every study I have seen has shown people work better at home (if they have a dedicated office or work area away) and are way more efficient. Less distractions and they get done faster to enjoy their day instead of stretching out the work because you are stuck at the office all day anyways.

    Leave a comment:


  • rufus
    replied
    It's not so much that. it's just if you're at home, how can the boss be sure you're actually working? Instead of just dicking around and watching pron on the internet.

    I mean, if you were in the office, you'd just be posting on USCHO all day instead of working.

    Leave a comment:


  • mookie1995
    replied
    Why are companies so keen on supporting commercial real estate??

    shareholders should be po’ed and demand instead that rent should be paid as dividends or buy backs

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    We had about 300 people in the office in my division at HQ. Now it's just about a dozen. Everyone else works remote.

    Leave a comment:


  • St. Clown
    replied
    Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post
    IIRC, I saw a piece sometime around Fall 2022 that indicated the percentage of the workforce still working from home full-time was less than 15%, so fully remote roles were already drying up leading into the 2023 layoffs. I do think quite a few folks, particularly in tech, have at least been able to work out hybrid arrangements where they only go into the office 2-3 days a week.
    I have the 2 WFH and 3 in-office days. My days in the office are only 4 hours, the remaining hours are also WFH, thanks to my manager on that last piont.

    Leave a comment:


  • Swansong
    replied
    Originally posted by unofan View Post

    Even if I could work from home full time, I wouldn't. 1-2 days per week is the sweet spot for me. Beyond that and it gets tough, as work and home life bleed together too much. I like the separation.
    Now that my office (and hospital system) are very close, I've gone from "f off, don't ask me to come into the office" to "I prefer to work from home but it's no big deal if I need to go in".

    The ol lady and I both work from home full time, but have separate offices that are only offices. So when I turn off at the end of the day, I don't come back in here. It's nice.


    When I lived in my old condo, my office was the living room and I hated it.

    Leave a comment:


  • French Rage
    replied
    We're pretty much all remote for my company in my area. Even when things reopened in mid-2021, I seemed to be the only person (other than the facilities/provisioning people who were there through the lockdown anyways) who actually came back in in an office that usually held around 150 people. And even I only did it for a few months. Then they moved the office to downtown SJ but it's only a few conferences rooms and several desks in a common area; they only want it used for larger important meetings, but for day to day stuff everything is remote. It's moot for me, my group is spread throughout the world so even if I went in I wouldn't actually be interacting with anyone there.

    Leave a comment:


  • unofan
    replied
    Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post
    IIRC, I saw a piece sometime around Fall 2022 that indicated the percentage of the workforce still working from home full-time was less than 15%, so fully remote roles were already drying up leading into the 2023 layoffs. I do think quite a few folks, particularly in tech, have at least been able to work out hybrid arrangements where they only go into the office 2-3 days a week.
    Even if I could work from home full time, I wouldn't. 1-2 days per week is the sweet spot for me. Beyond that and it gets tough, as work and home life bleed together too much. I like the separation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    My main job is from home

    Here is Faux dealing with the numbers: https://www.threads.net/@aaron.rupar...zCyfxg2Q1NlIRg

    Leave a comment:


  • FadeToBlack&Gold
    replied
    IIRC, I saw a piece sometime around Fall 2022 that indicated the percentage of the workforce still working from home full-time was less than 15%, so fully remote roles were already drying up leading into the 2023 layoffs. I do think quite a few folks, particularly in tech, have at least been able to work out hybrid arrangements where they only go into the office 2-3 days a week.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Jobs report strong, but one number hit home- number of people unemployed 27 weeks or more is up 20%.

    im also hearing that remote jobs are becoming fewer and fewer. That tracks because I feel like traffic here is worse than pre covid

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    AIicestevens should sounds smart...

    Leave a comment:


  • alicestevens
    replied
    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post

    I would not have any concern holding a large amount of money in a taxable account at fidelity. Very low risk. Sitting in a money market fund is an excellent choice while you take some time to figure out what to do with the money. Far better than buying/investing in something you regret or do not understand the tax implications.
    Money market funds are known for their stability and liquidity, making them an excellent temporary holding option while you decide on a long-term investment strategy. They provide a safe place to park your cash with relatively low risk while you explore other investment opportunities. I've been using ****edConsumer features to get clear, unbiased reviews and feedback on various financial products and services. This helps me understand potential pitfalls and advantages, ensuring that I make well-informed decisions
    Last edited by alicestevens; 06-20-2024, 03:32 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post

    Just had a significant amount of dividends in 1 year, which was unexpected. If you hold this in a taxable (regular) brokerage account, it likely left you with a larger than expected tax bill. If in a tax advantaged account, it would not matter. So the lesson is it is OK to hold a target date fund in a tax advantaged account, but should not hold in taxable account. There are good wiki's on bogleheads regarding asset allocation for specific accounts.
    IIRC, it was because of forced distributions. Bonds went up a **** ton in yield and prices cratered. So they had to buy a bunch of stuff and liquidate others. Those proceeds had to be returned to maintain certain fund NAVs.

    or something like that.

    I didn't even notice it until about six months ago. It's in a Roth IRA so I don't look at the transactions very often. But I couldn't get the massive basis blip in Quicken to go away. The value stayed the same but the basis jumped massively.

    I learned a very important lesson for zero cost to me.

    edit: wait no that wasn't it at all. It was a rebalancing due to shifting ratios on the glide path.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post

    Just had a significant amount of dividends in 1 year, which was unexpected. If you hold this in a taxable (regular) brokerage account, it likely left you with a larger than expected tax bill. If in a tax advantaged account, it would not matter. So the lesson is it is OK to hold a target date fund in a tax advantaged account, but should not hold in taxable account. There are good wiki's on bogleheads regarding asset allocation for specific accounts.
    Boglehead is what I’ve used- I have target date fund in my 401 and then do etf in taxable.

    Leave a comment:

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