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Business, Economics, and Taxes: Eat Cereal for Dinner

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  • mookie1995
    replied
    Can add here too….. driving to golf courses this week and trumble past factory after factory after warehouse of stuff being built.

    reminds mookie of one of the greatest films every made how bulworth asks Halle berry why they ain’t no black leaders anymore. Halle responds that there no longer longer factories in the inner city. They all left for cheaper labor and all the employed leaders vanished with them. There is a lot to that theory.

    Leave a comment:


  • mookie1995
    replied
    Originally posted by Jimjamesak View Post
    And large portfolios of commercial real estate.
    No kidding.
    as a shareholder mookie wants these rents available for dividend & buybacks. Not to support excess office space.
    ridiculous

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    That said, have you ever looked at GDP per capita? We're like nearly double that of Germany and the UK. So while I agree in principle with what you're saying, we would probably have a change in terms of lifestyle should we change too drastically, too quickly.

    but our goal should be to match the benefits and W/L balance of Europe.

    edit: which isn't to say GDP/C is a perfect metric. But it's still useful in this context.
    I mean handy covered a lot of this…but I’ve lived in two European nations. The exact two you called out, actually. Lived, not vacationed. You don’t need as much money. There’s virtually no education debt. No healthcare bankruptcies. No 70k giant SUVs or trucks

    you get 8-12 weeks of pto and people are just ****ing happier.

    yeah my boyfriend left me all the time because he legally had to be off- meanwhile they shipped in Americans like me to work like dogs since the euros were protected.

    I’d go back in a nanosecond. The only thing I hate is the lack of ac

    GDP honestly just seems like a misery index at times

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    I have...and have you ever seen how much vacation time they get or what the quality of life is? Also you don't need to earn as much money if half the things you need are paid for by the government. I remember when DGF lived in England her boyfriend would go mountain biking for weeks on end...in this country stuff like that is verboten.

    GDP is a fine metric for discussing the health of an economy...but it means bupkis when discussing standard of life and quality of life unless you are comparing say, Minnesota to Mississippi.

    Here is a thought experiment...and it is legit a conversation my SO and I have weekly. She has worked in her district for 18 years. She has cache, a good salary (not great..would be making way more because of my schooling) and tenure but the job is trash and already once drove her to the point of exhaustion. It's likely to get worse. The benefits also suck.

    Meanwhile my job pays me a decent amount less (8k a year) and is corporate not union so earnings are mostly capped with no tenure track. (Charter school) Better benefits by far and they make sure to not overload us with work. In fact if they think you are working too much they will tell you to take a half day off that is paid and will not count against your PTO. They send us gifts (i got $100 headphones) as thank yous, equipment for our home offices like a laptop and extra monitor and don't monitor us as long as we are hitting our teaching goals.

    Which job would you rather have? I could easily leave mine and makanquite a bit more because I have a Masters + 30 but why be miserable just so I can have a little extra cash? Plus either my freedom I kept my second job anyways and traveled way more than I could have. She is waffling joining me and I said she should. Her quality of life would improve ten fold.
    Last edited by Handyman; 06-08-2024, 11:00 PM.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    American workers woke up in the Pandemic to what the rest of the civilized world anyway knew...quality of life matters more than your job does. Capitalism convinced us working 40+ hour work weeks at jobs we hated was worth the stress because $$$$. Tradition kept it alive long past its usefulness and corporations lived high on the hog for decades because of it. Meanwhile in Europe people had better jobs, better work/life balance and better perks.

    Workers have finally realized they truly have the power (hence why unions are crushing) and it's time to weild it.
    That said, have you ever looked at GDP per capita? We're like nearly double that of Germany and the UK. So while I agree in principle with what you're saying, we would probably have a change in terms of lifestyle should we change too drastically, too quickly.

    but our goal should be to match the benefits and W/L balance of Europe.

    edit: which isn't to say GDP/C is a perfect metric. But it's still useful in this context.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by French Rage View Post

    Don't get me wrong, the quickness of the change leaves a lot of people holding a lot of bags and I can see them not being thrilled by it. And I don't mean the banks or the like, but regular small business people whose livelihood depended on everyone coming into an office complex 5 or more days a week. But this was going to happen anyways, as the ability to telecommute got better and better; even before the pandemic more and more people in my office were developing remotely and using Zoom for some meetings; the efficiencies and conveniences of doing so for jobs that allow it are obvious; it just took technology making it more seamless and for it to be more acceptable. All the pandemic did was jump the transition several steps forward in a limited amount of time. It didn't change where things were going; it just got them there more quickly. It will cause a lot of churn in the meantime, yes, but it's happening for reasons that awhile from now will be good reasons. And the cities will go on, in the same way they went on after factories left all of the downtowns. They won't look exactly the same as they have to us for the last 40-50 years, but then those iterations looked different than the 40-50 years for then, and so on.
    100% correct.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by French Rage View Post

    Our work laptops have ZScaler and about 8 million other apps that JAMF manages, so I assume if they really wanted to monitor our keystrokes they could. That, and scheduled updates with your manager, and whether things get done before deadlines, should help managers figure it out. I guess they actually need to manage now.
    I ****in hate zscaler. Not for what it does but because it's so flakey.

    anyways. Between that and the half dozen other middle-managementware they install on our computers, they know.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    American workers woke up in the Pandemic to what the rest of the civilized world anyway knew...quality of life matters more than your job does. Capitalism convinced us working 40+ hour work weeks at jobs we hated was worth the stress because $$$$. Tradition kept it alive long past its usefulness and corporations lived high on the hog for decades because of it. Meanwhile in Europe people had better jobs, better work/life balance and better perks.

    Workers have finally realized they truly have the power (hence why unions are crushing) and it's time to weild it.
    Consumers have the power. But consumers are also workers.

    In all honesty, if consumers were fully unionized, we could forget about the capitalism vs socialism debate. The system would be hybrid (as it is now and always has been) but tailored to human needs, not the owner class' profit.

    If I don't buy your sh-t, for whatever reason I decide, then your means of production is valueless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    American workers woke up in the Pandemic to what the rest of the civilized world anyway knew...quality of life matters more than your job does. Capitalism convinced us working 40+ hour work weeks at jobs we hated was worth the stress because $$$$. Tradition kept it alive long past its usefulness and corporations lived high on the hog for decades because of it. Meanwhile in Europe people had better jobs, better work/life balance and better perks.

    Workers have finally realized they truly have the power (hence why unions are crushing) and it's time to weild it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by French Rage View Post

    Don't get me wrong, the quickness of the change leaves a lot of people holding a lot of bags and I can see them not being thrilled by it. And I don't mean the banks or the like, but regular small business people whose livelihood depended on everyone coming into an office complex 5 or more days a week. But this was going to happen anyways, as the ability to telecommute got better and better; even before the pandemic more and more people in my office were developing remotely and using Zoom for some meetings; the efficiencies and conveniences of doing so for jobs that allow it are obvious; it just took technology making it more seamless and for it to be more acceptable. All the pandemic did was jump the transition several steps forward in a limited amount of time. It didn't change where things were going; it just got them there more quickly. It will cause a lot of churn in the meantime, yes, but it's happening for reasons that awhile from now will be good reasons. And the cities will go on, in the same way they went on after factories left all of the downtowns. They won't look exactly the same as they have to us for the last 40-50 years, but then those iterations looked different than the 40-50 years for then, and so on.
    I think remote work is a third tier change in terms of dislocation, like the internet or, in future, UBI. They move money around dramatically. Second tier included writing, religion, democracy, gunpowder, flight, women's liberation, birth control, automation, and will include extinction of fossil fuels. They move society around dramatically. First tier were fire, agriculture, industrialization, nuclear weapons, and now climate change. They change the face of the f-cking planet.

    Leave a comment:


  • French Rage
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    And all the fast food chains which serve people who are forced into work rather than having everything they need including meals at home.

    Not to mention that if a two-adult household has both working from home they don't need two cars.

    And all that gas saved and emissions saved.

    Obviously, it's TEH SOCIALISM!!1
    Don't get me wrong, the quickness of the change leaves a lot of people holding a lot of bags and I can see them not being thrilled by it. And I don't mean the banks or the like, but regular small business people whose livelihood depended on everyone coming into an office complex 5 or more days a week. But this was going to happen anyways, as the ability to telecommute got better and better; even before the pandemic more and more people in my office were developing remotely and using Zoom for some meetings; the efficiencies and conveniences of doing so for jobs that allow it are obvious; it just took technology making it more seamless and for it to be more acceptable. All the pandemic did was jump the transition several steps forward in a limited amount of time. It didn't change where things were going; it just got them there more quickly. It will cause a lot of churn in the meantime, yes, but it's happening for reasons that awhile from now will be good reasons. And the cities will go on, in the same way they went on after factories left all of the downtowns. They won't look exactly the same as they have to us for the last 40-50 years, but then those iterations looked different than the 40-50 years for then, and so on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Jimjamesak View Post
    And large portfolios of commercial real estate.
    And all the fast food chains which serve people who are forced into work rather than having everything they need including meals at home.

    Not to mention that if a two-adult household has both working from home they don't need two cars.

    And all that gas saved and emissions saved.

    Obviously, it's TEH SOCIALISM!!1

    Leave a comment:


  • French Rage
    replied
    Originally posted by rufus View Post
    It's not so much that. it's just if you're at home, how can the boss be sure you're actually working? Instead of just dicking around and watching pron on the internet.

    I mean, if you were in the office, you'd just be posting on USCHO all day instead of working.
    Our work laptops have ZScaler and about 8 million other apps that JAMF manages, so I assume if they really wanted to monitor our keystrokes they could. That, and scheduled updates with your manager, and whether things get done before deadlines, should help managers figure it out. I guess they actually need to manage now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimjamesak
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Remote work is an existential threat to mid-level management.
    And large portfolios of commercial real estate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    Every study I have seen has shown people work better at home (if they have a dedicated office or work area away) and are way more efficient. Less distractions and they get done faster to enjoy their day instead of stretching out the work because you are stuck at the office all day anyways.
    Remote work is an existential threat to mid-level management.

    Leave a comment:

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