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  • Kepler
    replied
    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • French Rage
    replied
    Seconding Ring. The current iteration (#4?) has good video quality, and it will also include the 10s before motion sets it off so you get a better idea of what is happening. You can tweak the motion areas and sensitivity so you don't wear out the battery too quickly. I know it says it can go 3-4 months, but we usually get 1.5 months out of it with decent motion sensitivity. You can get a second battery and have it charged for a hot swap that will take all of 2-3 minutes when necessary.

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  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Also: I'm going to get a doorbell cam (unrelated). Anybody have any good recommendations or warnings? And do I have to clear it with my HOA?
    Like Handy, we have the Ring doorbell camera. It works great. In fact, sometimes it works a little too great, as I've had it set off by a boxelder bug walking across it. However, if you spend your time playing around with it and watching what is happening outside, you'll quickly kill the battery and have to recharge it, so that's a pain.

    I primarily bought it not for security reasons, but because our house sits down at the end of a long, curvy street, but right in front of our house it makes a 90 degree left turn. It's been a neverending stream of young street racers who have not made the turn and then broken their front axel on the curb in front of our house, or ended up buried in a six foot snowbank. Before the Ring, I only got to witness the smoking wreckage, and never the actual event. Better than tv, sometimes.

    As for the HOA question, you'd have to read your bylaws. I would be surprised if they are banned, but I'd look for things like reference to security cameras.

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  • Handyman
    replied
    Doorcam footage is often backed up to a cloud (and you can have it saved even longer with their add on services) so I don't see any way cops could protect themselves unless they get a new law written/decided by the SC which seems unlikely.

    I have This One which I got on sale a few years back (they often are on sale during the year so keep tabs) and it works great and was super easy to install even for me and I am all thumbs.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    If doorbell cams keep catching police murders I'll bet The Brotherhood lobbies to ban them, or impound the footage.

    It is getting harder and hard to do killing in the name. Won't someone think of the real victims here?

    In non-sarcastic news, what would happen if people just started uploading their doorcam footage the instant something like this happened? The cops have recourse to all the commercial closed circuit footage they can simply grab and selectively release or delete. Why not use the power of the people and make those coverups impossible?

    Also: I'm going to get a doorbell cam (unrelated). Anybody have any good recommendations or warnings? And do I have to clear it with my HOA?
    Last edited by Kepler; 04-13-2022, 11:44 AM.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    I mean, if there was a fight, it's more than just possible it fell off.

    guess we'll see tomorrow what constitutes a "fight"

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  • MissThundercat
    replied
    Officer involved shooting where the body cam just "fell off." The video will be released tomorrow and downtown GR is heavily barricaded.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.woo...-shooting/amp/

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  • WisconsinWildcard
    replied
    Originally posted by Swansong View Post

    I was about to post this (minus the first-hand experience, obviously). I don't know if an average hospitalist makes crazy money as well.


    And how do residents have time to do much of anything? I thought they worked you guys 24/7? :-)
    Yeah it all depends on where you work and how much you work. Most large city positions do not pay as well a rural positions, large well known academic positions pay far less than less prestigious academic positions.

    For residency, it depends on the specialty. We are limited, in general, to 80 hours a week averaged over a month. Many specialties (surgery, neurosurgery especially) are always at this limit and many break it regularly (the residents basically lie about their hours). It is a bad culture but it is what it is. At my medical school, they audited the residents parking patterns and found they were working 120 hours a week on average, all writing 80 hours on the dot on their documentation.

    Other residencies or fellowships, may only work 60 or 70 hours a week, especially in the later years. That makes it easier to pick up an extra 6 hour shift at the end of the day (6PM to midnight admitting surplus patients). I worked at an infusion center on the weekends. I basically sat there, studied for boards, and the nurse would do everything (as they usually do). Every 4-5 sessions, I would be asked to see someone if they were having a reaction or something. Super chill and paid $50 an hour, basically to use my MD since many infusions require an MD to be on site, and no one in the group practice wanted to work weekends, so they paid a group of residents/fellows to do it.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Swansong View Post

    I was about to post this (minus the first-hand experience, obviously). I don't know if an average hospitalist makes crazy money as well.


    And how do residents have time to do much of anything? I thought they worked you guys 24/7? :-)
    One last post on the topic.

    Based on this, the median is $200k for an entry level doc (which I'm guessing includes all locations and every kind of doc: family, internists and specialists, as well as surgeons - so it probably skews high). I've seen other sources that say average (as opposed to median in the link) starting salary is $170k-$180k, which may be more accurate for general practice.

    Edit: CHanged the wording to be more accurate

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  • WisconsinWildcard
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
    Yeah I truly just don’t see cop as a moonlighting job for most. But, maybe there’s a larger group than we know.
    Yeah I agree. I can see a security-like position, but I would have to imagine the standards to be hired as a cop would have to be very low for a physician to be able to swing it. Or one would have to be a cop before becoming a physician (I do not think I know someone like that).

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  • Swansong
    replied
    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post
    A few things. I know many, many docs that make under 200k/year. Many make more. Generally, loans are either there or not. For 1 person, it is usually 200-400K depending on undergrad. I know couples who have 600-800K in student loans. The ones who are lucky have their parents pay for it. Also remember, most docs spend their 20s and early 30s with basically no retirement savings. This puts people in a huge hole (the most powerful savings are in your 20s), plus there are the lifestyle inflation pressures because of the assumptions most are making that doctors are "rich." So, on average, doctors tend to make worse financial decisions and spend too much. 25% of doctors do not have 1 million in assets at retirement age, which given their salary, is really unthinkable. I work on resident financial education and can tell you from experience, doctors on the whole know very very little about finances.


    Many residents moonlight. I did. If you are lucky, you can moonlight as a physician, but I know others who would work security, work at the gym, door dash, uber, etc. The non-physician jobs can help get around duty hour limitations (not that I agree with that). I do not know a single physician working as a cop.
    I was about to post this (minus the first-hand experience, obviously). I don't know if an average hospitalist makes crazy money as well.


    And how do residents have time to do much of anything? I thought they worked you guys 24/7? :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Yeah I truly just don’t see cop as a moonlighting job for most. But, maybe there’s a larger group than we know.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post
    A few things. I know many, many docs that make under 200k/year. Many make more. Generally, loans are either there or not. For 1 person, it is usually 200-400K depending on undergrad. I know couples who have 600-800K in student loans. The ones who are lucky have their parents pay for it. Also remember, most docs spend their 20s and early 30s with basically no retirement savings. This puts people in a huge hole (the most powerful savings are in your 20s), plus there are the lifestyle inflation pressures because of the assumptions most are making that doctors are "rich." So, on average, doctors tend to make worse financial decisions and spend too much. 25% of doctors do not have 1 million in assets at retirement age, which given their salary, is really unthinkable. I work on resident financial education and can tell you from experience, doctors on the whole know very very little about finances.


    Many residents moonlight. I did. If you are lucky, you can moonlight as a physician, but I know others who would work security, work at the gym, door dash, uber, etc. The non-physician jobs can help get around duty hour limitations (not that I agree with that). I do not know a single physician working as a cop.
    Thanks for weighing in. Figured it was only a matter of time and was hoping to get your take.

    Leave a comment:


  • WisconsinWildcard
    replied
    A few things. I know many, many docs that make under 200k/year. Many make more. Generally, loans are either there or not. For 1 person, it is usually 200-400K depending on undergrad. I know couples who have 600-800K in student loans. The ones who are lucky have their parents pay for it. Also remember, most docs spend their 20s and early 30s with basically no retirement savings. This puts people in a huge hole (the most powerful savings are in your 20s), plus there are the lifestyle inflation pressures because of the assumptions most are making that doctors are "rich." So, on average, doctors tend to make worse financial decisions and spend too much. 25% of doctors do not have 1 million in assets at retirement age, which given their salary, is really unthinkable. I work on resident financial education and can tell you from experience, doctors on the whole know very very little about finances.


    Many residents moonlight. I did. If you are lucky, you can moonlight as a physician, but I know others who would work security, work at the gym, door dash, uber, etc. The non-physician jobs can help get around duty hour limitations (not that I agree with that). I do not know a single physician working as a cop.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post

    Probably better doctors than they are cops...

    From what I saw the average med school grad owes near $250k. Residents make on average $62k a year which is pretty good but not when you have that kind of debt.

    Here is an interesting article about the misconception.

    I have read/heard other doctors say much the same thing. It can take a long time to get on your feet depending where you work and the cost of living in the town you work in.
    Residency lasts a couple years. And you're almost always on an income-based repayment plan during that time. So your actual payments are not that bad. Once you get past residency, your income jumps wildly (and of course, so do your student loan payments).

    Hell, I know a doc who makes several flights a year, him, his wife, and two children. They have a new house, two new cars. Only one of them works. Again, non-specialist pediatrician working at a local clinic in the burbs IIRC. He's only a few years out of residency.

    Not saying it's a guarantee, but I don't think it's outside the norm at all.

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