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Business, Economics, and Taxes: Capitalism. Yay? >=(

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  • aparch
    replied
    Ticketmaster halts remaining sales for Taylor Swift tickets. Claims not enough volume remains for general sale. Also claims that "verified" ticket registrations to get into the pre-sale were over 3.5 million and overwhelmed the system. Also says Bots still got in and got tickets as well. Shrugs shoulders and exclaims "Nothing else we can do."

    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2022/11/17/b...ion/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • RaceBoarder
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
    It’s not even corporate accounts. My family has kraken season tickets and they get first right of refusal for every event at climate pledge.

    maybe that’s normal ?
    It's a step before it's offered to individual ticket holders. These accounts often buy Suites and Luxury areas along with a large chunk of regular tickets. These accounts could easily be 50+ tickets/night for each individual account. That's why the add up. Buildings could have 20-30 of these accounts easily.

    This is the exact reason why Leafs games at the ACC have the rep that they do.

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
    It’s not even corporate accounts. My family has kraken season tickets and they get first right of refusal for every event at climate pledge.

    maybe that’s normal ?
    When I had season tickets for the Wild, we used to get first crack at tickets for other events in the arena. But we have Vikings season tickets, and seat licenses, and I don't think I've ever received notice of a chance to buy concert seats early.

    Leave a comment:


  • ScoobyDoo
    replied
    It's a big deal to be rich enough to attend BIG events. That's why small colleges, high schools, and smaller music venues are the way to go.

    Leave a comment:


  • French Rage
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
    It’s not even corporate accounts. My family has kraken season tickets and they get first right of refusal for every event at climate pledge.

    maybe that’s normal ?
    It sounds like seat licenses or whatever they were calling them for NFL stadiums where you pretty much "owned" the seat at the arena overall, versus for a particular sport. All for the cheap cost of like $10K or $15K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    It’s not even corporate accounts. My family has kraken season tickets and they get first right of refusal for every event at climate pledge.

    maybe that’s normal ?

    Leave a comment:


  • RaceBoarder
    replied
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

    No you didn't. You speculated that 30% of the people who bought tickets have zero interest in attending the show, and you suggested that they shouldn't be allowed to buy tickets. I think that's a hilarious argument.

    After the Springsteen tickets came out and he caught some heat in the press about the prices, I heard a radio show where listeners were invited to call in and comment on the ticket sales and prices. Jeebus, it was a hour of literally the same biatch. "I've been a Springsteen fan since the '70's. I've been to a hundred and fifty of his concerts. It's BS that ticketmaster doesn't let us "real" Springsteen fans in to buy tickets before all of these people who have no interest at all in his music. Blah, blah, blah."

    Someone who has zero interest in Taylor Swift music (that would be me) has exactly the same right as dx and the rest of the middle school girl crowd (or their daddies) to buy those tickets.

    The prices are high for two reasons, and only two reasons. First, there is pent-up demand for concerts after the pandemic and so people are willing to pay more. Second, people are willing to buy tickets and speculate that they will go up in value, or that they'll be able to sell them for more than they paid for them. They are probably not wrong.
    No. I stated that 30% of the building is sold to "corporate" accounts. Those accounts get 1st crack at the tickets, even before presales and other offerings to the general public. These accounts buy tickets to EVERY event that a building hosts. You can bet that any company who owns naming rights has a significant amount of tickets allocated to them. You also have the presenting sponsors of the building's main tenants (whomever that may be).

    Since these are totally corporate accounts the prices are artificially inflated (like Business class flights, or the trendy, downtown steakhouse where every other meal is placed on a corporate card).

    Leave a comment:


  • ScoobyDoo
    replied
    Originally posted by cF[Authentic] View Post
    I think the problem is that re-selling tickets is now a business rather than a convenient option for people when plans change.
    Tickets have gone pure capitalism. And there is nothing anyone can really do about it. It fits right in with Twitter and everything else that Information Technology has destroyed. Law, and morals have not kept up with Technology.

    Leave a comment:


  • cF[Authentic]
    replied
    I think the problem is that re-selling tickets is now a business rather than a convenient option for people when plans change.

    Leave a comment:


  • Proud2baLaker
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    I guess I get lucky I see shows all the time and rarely is the price gouged. But then I'm willing to walk away if the price sucks like Springsteen.
    I honestly cant remember if any show I have ever seen have been through Ticketmaster. Its always been straight through the venue or some other smaller Ticketmaster type service that at least on the surface hasn't appeared to be an absolute fuck show (never had any problems or super crazy fees; but I have also never had to worry about transfer or sell back or anything). Sounds like I have dodged a bullet.

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    I guess I get lucky I see shows all the time and rarely is the price gouged. But then I'm willing to walk away if the price sucks like Springsteen.
    Absolutely. I'd love to go back to the Masters again. I'm just not willing to pay the price. I'd love to go to a Super Bowl once. Same thing.

    But I don't begrudge people who are willing to pay the price, or the person selling the tickets.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    I guess I get lucky I see shows all the time and rarely is the price gouged. But then I'm willing to walk away if the price sucks like Springsteen.

    Leave a comment:


  • ScoobyDoo
    replied
    Technology destroyed the music industry (Napster, anyone?). Thus, concerts have become the big money sink. Pretty much why I don't like to go to concerts anymore but it was a big part of my youth. Every time I do go to a concert with me and my significant other it's a 500 dollar drop usually. Pretty much the same reason I hate live sports. Too expensive. Hell, even the TV version is getting overpriced.

    Leave a comment:


  • cF[Authentic]
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    b) yes, and it's his usual schtick of dog-eat-dog capitalism where the rich get to trample everyone else and hovey gets to just blissfully ignore it because he's got his.
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

    Second, people are willing to buy tickets and speculate that they will go up in value, or that they'll be able to sell them for more than they paid for them. They are probably not wrong.
    shocking...

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by RaceBoarder View Post

    I just laid out a plan to reduce costs by 30%.

    The market is artificially manipulated.
    No you didn't. You speculated that 30% of the people who bought tickets have zero interest in attending the show, and you suggested that they shouldn't be allowed to buy tickets. I think that's a hilarious argument.

    After the Springsteen tickets came out and he caught some heat in the press about the prices, I heard a radio show where listeners were invited to call in and comment on the ticket sales and prices. Jeebus, it was a hour of literally the same biatch. "I've been a Springsteen fan since the '70's. I've been to a hundred and fifty of his concerts. It's BS that ticketmaster doesn't let us "real" Springsteen fans in to buy tickets before all of these people who have no interest at all in his music. Blah, blah, blah."

    Someone who has zero interest in Taylor Swift music (that would be me) has exactly the same right as dx and the rest of the middle school girl crowd (or their daddies) to buy those tickets.

    The prices are high for two reasons, and only two reasons. First, there is pent-up demand for concerts after the pandemic and so people are willing to pay more. Second, people are willing to buy tickets and speculate that they will go up in value, or that they'll be able to sell them for more than they paid for them. They are probably not wrong.

    Leave a comment:

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