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  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by ScoobyDoo View Post
    So, the truck can be hacked at any time by anyone. Nice. I'll never own that piece of ****.
    I came across an interview with a Tesla engineer, albeit from 2018, where he talked about how no "safety" system was hooked to the main profibus chain, however "essential" systems were. So, for example, they could cut your brake lights, but not your brakes.

    I will try to find it, I was in a hurry and failed to link it here.

    Edit: amazingly, I actually found it again. It's Greek to me, but I am sure our car folks and developers can understand it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimjamesak
    replied
    Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post

    People have been 'shipping this merger for years. Other than HA's Scarebuses, it makes hella more sense and is less anti-competitive than JetBlue and Spirit. Keeping both brands gives off "Air France-KLM Group" vibes. Besides which, AS did away with Virgin America's A320s, so there's no reason they won't do it again over time.
    Really? This is the first I’ve ever heard of it. Sounds like it was a “save the airline” type deal since nearly half of the cost is HA’s debt, a cool $900 million dollars worth. I don’t think the Hawaiian “brand” is going anywhere, especially with the need for inter-island flights, but I could see its focus definitely shifting. I do think AS will get rid of the Airbuses in favor of Dreamliners eventually though.

    Not sure what to think of the deal though.

    Leave a comment:


  • ScoobyDoo
    replied
    So, the truck can be hacked at any time by anyone. Nice. I'll never own that piece of ****.

    Leave a comment:


  • FadeToBlack&Gold
    replied
    Originally posted by TalonsUpPuckDown View Post
    And providing evidence that every step was taken according to procedure AND that everything was documented AND the auditors reviewed and signed off.
    And if the procedure changes just one little bit, or there's one misspelling found in the process documentation, it must be corrected, initialed, and versioned. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • FadeToBlack&Gold
    replied
    Originally posted by Jimjamesak View Post
    Kinda surprised that it passed under the radar of everyone but Alaska Airlines has agreed to buy Hawaiian Airlines.

    The plan seems to be to keep them separate but with the same management.

    Kind of weird move since Alaska uses 737s almost exclusively, they finally got rid of their A320s, but Hawaiian uses 717s for their inter-Island routes and A320s, A321s, and A330s for their medium and long routes. Hawaiian also flies long haul international routes to Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and South Korea, something Alaska has never even considered.
    People have been 'shipping this merger for years. Other than HA's Scarebuses, it makes hella more sense and is less anti-competitive than JetBlue and Spirit. Keeping both brands gives off "Air France-KLM Group" vibes. Besides which, AS did away with Virgin America's A320s, so there's no reason they won't do it again over time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    Ya know...I used to lament that COVID hit and my pay tanked right when I was about to buy a Tesla. Man am I happy these days about it...

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Every component is addressable. Think of it like a Roku on your home network. It gets an IP addresss and if you replace it you need to set the IP addresss again.

    now, your network at home is smart enough and simple enough to automatically assign a new addfesss. My understanding of profibus is that's not how it works. Everything needs to have its address set manually.

    worse yet, if they're particularly dumb, they daisy chained the components. Meaning if the upstream component fails, everything downstream does too. We sometimes do this in industrial automation so we don't have to pull wires back to the central controller. Which is insanely expensive in explosive atmospheres where the controller might be 1000 feet away. No reasonale engineer would do this in a car where the longest run is like 15 feet.

    But you generally wouldn't daisy chain a critical control element. I don't have faith that Tesla has hired the right industrial controls engineers who understand how to intelligently setup a profibus network.

    lady I checked in with the profibus systems I was involved with, they were tearing them all out to something more reliable.
    Last edited by dxmnkd316; 12-04-2023, 11:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Handyman
    replied
    What does that mean?

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Holy ****ing christ

    tesla made every electrical component part of a profibus network on cybertruck. Oh my god.

    Including the taillights. That's their drive by wire system.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by LynahFan View Post
    Yeah, well, of that hour, it’s 30 seconds to write the code, and then 59 minutes and 30 seconds documenting and testing the ever-loving spit out of it.

    But I hope you don’t literally mean two orders of magnitude - 1000 lines per person per day terrifies me!
    Yeah for some reason my brain translated that to 100-200 when I wrote it. 1,000 would be insane unless you're pulling from existing repositories. But that's not writing, that's adding libraries.

    Leave a comment:


  • TalonsUpPuckDown
    replied
    Originally posted by LynahFan View Post
    Yeah, well, of that hour, it’s 30 seconds to write the code, and then 59 minutes and 30 seconds documenting and testing the ever-loving spit out of it.

    But I hope you don’t literally mean two orders of magnitude - 1000 lines per person per day terrifies me!
    And providing evidence that every step was taken according to procedure AND that everything was documented AND the auditors reviewed and signed off.

    I worked on medical device software where a bug in the application could kill a patient. Coding is easy. The testing, documenting, auditing, etc. is the real killer (pun intended).

    As an aside, another software product from the same company had a bug that prevented a sophisticated blood refrigerator door from opening which prevented a newborn from receiving a transfusion. The company avoided being sued in this case because the baby was deemed so far gone that the emergency transfusion they were attempting was basically a hail mary. Fortunately I wasn't involved in the paperwork on that one. Yuk.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimjamesak
    replied
    Kinda surprised that it passed under the radar of everyone but Alaska Airlines has agreed to buy Hawaiian Airlines.

    The plan seems to be to keep them separate but with the same management.

    Kind of weird move since Alaska uses 737s almost exclusively, they finally got rid of their A320s, but Hawaiian uses 717s for their inter-Island routes and A320s, A321s, and A330s for their medium and long routes. Hawaiian also flies long haul international routes to Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and South Korea, something Alaska has never even considered.

    Leave a comment:


  • Drew S.
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post

    Thanks for the tip. Been here just over 5 years, plan to call accountant soon. Good news is that I’m unemployed so next year my income should be lower
    Def check with an accountant but I believe if you have been in a place two years the first $500k of increase is free(at least as far as federal taxes go.)

    If you do get a decent amount of cash one good thing right now is you can get a nice return on it relatively risk free.

    Leave a comment:


  • LynahFan
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    "10 lines of code per engineer per day" is about two orders of magnitude lower than I would have guessed. But it also makes me significantly happier and quite a bit more secure flying

    It's like students/teacher. Probably better if that number stays under three digits :-D

    edit: holy hell. That's very roughly a line of code per hour. It's just really funny to think about that and imagine someone two-finger pecking at a keyboard.
    Yeah, well, of that hour, it’s 30 seconds to write the code, and then 59 minutes and 30 seconds documenting and testing the ever-loving spit out of it.

    But I hope you don’t literally mean two orders of magnitude - 1000 lines per person per day terrifies me!

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

    You're going to see a lot of cities moving to a system where the repair or replacement costs are just added to the budget, and not assessed.

    Street assessments used to be pretty standard, typically done on a front foot basis. The bigger the lot fronting the street, the higher the assessment. The logic behind assessments, rather than including it in the general tax obligations, is that streets will be repaired or replaced on a need basis, and not based upon the political or economic power of certain individuals. If it's part of the general tax obligations, those with the most political or economic power will likely get their streets repaired first.

    The law in Minnesota has always been that front foot assessments are legal, as a method. But sort of an unspoken part of the law is that the amount of the assessment cannot exceed the amount of the benefit to your property. Thus, if they assess you $16,000, they better be able to prove that the value of your property increased by at least $16,000.

    The thing is, no one ever really fought the cities on this (can't fight city hall?). But recently that has changed. Honestly, even in a City like Edina it would probably be pretty hard to prove that your house increased in value by $25,000 just because you got a new street and curb. Plus, it's sort of an impossible proof problem. How does the City prove that?

    I remember reading a story in the StarTrib about a very recent case out of St. Paul, I think, where the City got crushed in one of these challenges. I think the result is going to be that pretty much all cities are just going to include it as part of the cost borne by the taxpayers as a whole, which sucks for anyone who recently paid an assessment, I guess.

    Also, as I recall our earlier discussion, I think we were talking about the large gain you've experienced in the value of your house. I am not a CPA, so take this with a grain of salt, but make sure you fit in all the rules for excluding some or all of that gain. I think you need to be in the house for a certain period of time. Also, I think that you can't use that exclusion if you used it recently.

    Good luck on the sale.
    Thanks for the tip. Been here just over 5 years, plan to call accountant soon. Good news is that I’m unemployed so next year my income should be lower

    Leave a comment:

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