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  • joecct
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    From FB.

    This was written by a guy who has a PHD in genetics

    PS LONG read..

    Here's a great post to help explain this whole thing:

    Feeling confused as to why Coronavirus is a bigger deal than Seasonal flu? Here it is in a nutshell. I hope this helps. Feel free to share this to others who don’t understand...

    It has to do with RNA sequencing....i.e. genetics.

    Seasonal flu is an “all human virus”. The DNA/RNA chains that make up the virus are recognized by the human immune system. This means that your body has some immunity to it before it comes around each year... you get immunity two ways...through exposure to a virus, or by getting a flu shot.

    Novel viruses, come from animals.... the WHO tracks novel viruses in animals, (sometimes for years watching for mutations). Usually these viruses only transfer from animal to animal (pigs in the case of H1N1) (birds in the case of the Spanish flu). But once, one of these animal viruses mutates, and starts to transfer from animals to humans... then it’s a problem, Why? Because we have no natural or acquired immunity.. the RNA sequence of the genes inside the virus isn’t human, and the human immune system doesn’t recognize it so, we can’t fight it off.

    Now.... sometimes, the mutation only allows transfer from animal to human, for years it’s only transmission is from an infected animal to a human before it finally mutates so that it can now transfer human to human...once that happens..we have a new contagion phase. And depending on the fashion of this new mutation, thats what decides how contagious, or how deadly it’s gonna be..

    H1N1 was deadly....but it did not mutate in a way that was as deadly as the Spanish flu. It’s RNA was slower to mutate and it attacked its host differently, too.

    Fast forward.

    Now, here comes this Coronavirus...it existed in animals only, for nobody knows how long...but one day, at an animal market, in Wuhan China, in December 2019, it mutated and made the jump from animal to people. At first, only animals could give it to a person...But here is the scary part....in just TWO WEEKS it mutated again and gained the ability to jump from human to human. Scientists call this quick ability, “slippery”

    This Coronavirus, not being in any form a “human” virus (whereas we would all have some natural or acquired immunity). Took off like a rocket. And this was because humans have no known immunity...doctors have no known medicines for it.

    And it just so happens that this particular mutated animal virus, changed itself in such a way that it causes great damage to human lungs..

    That’s why Coronavirus is different from seasonal flu, or H1N1 or any other type of influenza.... this one is slippery AF. And it’s a lung eater...and it’s already mutated AGAIN, so that we now have two strains to deal with, strain S and strain L....which makes it twice as hard to develop a vaccine.

    We really have no tools in our shed with this. History has shown that fast and immediate closings of public places has helped in the past pandemics. Philadelphia and Baltimore were reluctant to close events in 1918 and they were the hardest hit in the US during the Spanish Flu.

    Factoid: Henry VIII stayed in his room and allowed no one near him, till the Black Plague passed...(honestly...I understand him so much better now). Just like us, he had no tools in his shed, except social isolation...

    And let me end by saying....right now it’s hitting older folks harder... but this genome is so slippery...if it mutates again (and it will). Who is to say, what it will do next.

    Be smart folks... acting like you’re unafraid is so not **** right now.

    #flattenthecurve. Stay home folks... and share this to those that just are not catching on

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    It is essential that the public stay up to date on vital information during the coronavirus pandemic. For that reason, Scientific American is providing free access to all of our COVID-19 coverage: https://www.scientificamerican.com/t...rpHM2bpaja1MjQ

    Leave a comment:


  • ticapnews
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    http://www.amazingeducationalresources.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-ca...dCnLt4Jdq4gCQ#

    Cool idea

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    Opera anyone? https://operawire.com/metropolitan-o...opera-streams/

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/16/trum...-pandemic.html

    Link with newest recommendations stolen from someone else's post. Can't find them on the CDC website yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    This is a great link! Thanks! I am forwarding to my family

    Leave a comment:


  • Scarlet
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    I thought this link had some helpful info around grocery shopping:

    https://www.consumerreports.org/food...cery-shopping/

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    Originally posted by ticapnews View Post
    Thank you Les! If you don't object I'll sticky this so this thread is always at the top of the forum.
    No problem but no one is really posting but me! So many freebees from different places I can't keep up

    Leave a comment:


  • ticapnews
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    Thank you Les! If you don't object I'll sticky this so this thread is always at the top of the forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...n-control.html

    Updated PPE recommendations for the care of patients with known or suspected COVID-19:
    Based on local and regional situational analysis of PPE supplies, facemasks are an acceptable alternative when the supply chain of respirators cannot meet the demand. During this time, available respirators should be prioritized for procedures that are likely to generate respiratory aerosols, which would pose the highest exposure risk to HCP.
    Facemasks protect the wearer from splashes and sprays.
    Respirators, which filter inspired air, offer respiratory protection.
    When the supply chain is restored, facilities with a respiratory protection program should return to use of respirators for patients with known or suspected COVID-19. Facilities that do not currently have a respiratory protection program, but care for patients infected with pathogens for which a respirator is recommended, should implement a respiratory protection program.
    Eye protection, gown, and gloves continue to be recommended.
    If there are shortages of gowns, they should be prioritized for aerosol-generating procedures, care activities where splashes and sprays are anticipated, and high-contact patient care activities that provide opportunities for transfer of pathogens to the hands and clothing of HCP.
    Included are considerations for designating entire units within the facility, with dedicated HCP, to care for known or suspected COVID-19 patients and options for extended use of respirators, facemasks, and eye protection on such units. Updated recommendations regarding need for an airborne infection isolation room (AIIR).
    Patients with known or suspected COVID-19 should be cared for in a single-person room with the door closed. Airborne Infection Isolation Rooms (AIIRs) (See definition of AIIR in appendix) should be reserved for patients undergoing aerosol-generating procedures (See Aerosol-Generating Procedures Section)
    Updated information in the background is based on currently available information about COVID-19 and the current situation in the United States, which includes reports of cases of community transmission, infections identified in healthcare personnel (HCP), and shortages of facemasks, N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) (commonly known as N95 respirators), and gowns.
    Increased emphasis on early identification and implementation of source control (i.e., putting a face mask on patients presenting with symptoms of respiratory infection).

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    ANd on a lighter note- free coloring books

    http://www.openculture.com/2017/02/f...p07mqVMzlqjNgA
    Last edited by leswp1; 03-16-2020, 03:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news...ovid-19-begins

    Stage one Vaccine testing update-
    Dr Fauci just clarified- they gave the first dose today. They need to repeat at 1 month and three months and then follow the patient for a year before confirming efficacy
    Last edited by leswp1; 03-16-2020, 03:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    https://www.nytimes.com/article/coro...trictions.html

    Interesting list of travel restrictions

    Leave a comment:


  • leswp1
    replied
    Re: COVID Resource thread- places to get resources, information or help

    Important Message From the Chief Nursing Officer
    Dear ANA Member,

    Significant changes have occurred this week as the number of cases in the USA and globally continues to rise. On Wednesday, the World Health Organization (WHO) officially declared that the global coronavirus crisis is now a pandemic. Also, on Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released interim recommendations for personal protective equipment that includes a recommendation for areas where there is a shortage of N95 masks (a medical face mask can provide appropriate protection during patient care). In response, ANA's official statement called on the CDC to provide a more definitive statement about the transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19) so that nurses can be confident in this guidance that a medical mask, along with the other required droplet Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), is appropriate to provide patient care for known COVID-19 cases.
    The question of transmission is very challenging at this point in a viral event. There is not clarity on exactly how COVID-19 is transmitted: can the virus be aerosolized (airborne transmission), is it principally transmitted via a larger droplet (droplet transmission), and how long does the virus remain viable on surfaces? The type of respiratory protection (medical mask vs. N95 respirator) is dependent on whether the virus is transmitted via a smaller particle that is airborne (fit-tested N95 respirator) or a larger droplet that travels a shorter distance in the air typically expelled through a cough or sneeze (medical mask).
    According to the WHO Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease 2019, dated February 16-24, 2020, "COVID-19 is transmitted via droplets and fomites during close unprotected contact between infector and infectee. Airborne spread has not been reported for COVID-19 and it is not believed to be a major driver of transmission based on the available data." This new information, along with known shortages of PPE, prompted the WHO to shift its PPE recommendations to a medical mask as an appropriate alternative when providing patient care to suspected and known cases of COVID-19. The WHO guidance states that an N95 respirator is warranted when staff is performing aerosol-generating procedures, such as, but not limited to, positive pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation or extubation, bronchoscopy, airway suction, ventilator care, tracheostomy care, Chest PT, nebulizer treatment, and sputum induction. However, research released on March 9 through the New England Journal of Medicine, Aerosol and surface stability of HCoV-19 (SARS-CoV-2) compared to SARS-CoV-1, found that "aerosol and fomite transmission of HCoV-19 is plausible, as the virus can remain viable in aerosols for multiple hours and on surfaces up to days." These findings suggest that CDC's new interim recommendations for use of a medical mask during patient care may place nurses at risk.
    This is complicated by the fact that we do not have a sufficient supply of N95 respirators that may be needed throughout a longer event. The WHO and CDC would argue that the revised respiratory requirements are designed to conserve the supply of N95 respirators so the overall response can be sustained for a longer period. The Code of Ethics for Nurses offers the following guidance:
    • Nurses have a duty to ourselves as well as others.
    • Only in extreme emergencies and under exceptional conditions, whether due to forces of nature or to human action, may nurses subordinate human rights concerns to other considerations. This subordination may occur when there is both an increase in the number of ill, injured, or at-risk patients and a decrease in access to customary resources and healthcare personnel
    • A utilitarian framework usually guides decision and actions with special emphasis on transparency, protection of the public, proportional restriction of individual liberty, and fair stewardship of resources.
    ANA continues to examine the evidence around transmission of COVID-19 and recognizes that evidence and information is evolving. We are advocating for the best protection based on the scientific knowledge available now but acknowledge that this is a fluid situation. We appreciate the efforts of all nurses to respond to the coronavirus outbreak. We will keep you updated should the information on transmission and PPE change.

    Regards,

    Debbie Dawson Hatmaker, PhD, RN, FAAN

    Chief Nursing Officer | EVP

    Leave a comment:

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