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  • MissThundercat
    replied
    To my 20 year old coworkers:

    You're not supposed to have video chats in the office. Especially in the presence of PHI.

    I shouldn't have to explain this to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • TalonsUpPuckDown
    replied
    As a semi-retired small business owner I despise sitting down with my one employee during review/goal setting. The guy is a real PIA. Always pushing for more, always questioning why I question his performance. I hate these reviews.

    BTW, I'm also the employee (ha). And this non-objective HR-sponsored silliness about performance ratings/objectives subsequently tied to comp and promotions is the reason I've turned down half a dozen offers back in the corporate world. For years I sat on both sides of the table in these types of meetings and I just can't do it anymore. I doff my chapeau to those who still have the strength to soldier on. <golf clap>

    Leave a comment:


  • MichVandal
    replied
    At this point, all I can say is I'm happy that I don't have to worry much about it anymore. Down to 2 1/2 months.

    Leave a comment:


  • LynahFan
    replied
    Pretty much the same. Don’t forget that annual performance ratings are submitted in early October, and most managers just go by how they feel about each employee’s performance, nothing whatsoever to do with quantifiable performance against objective goals.

    The good news: hiring managers in our company have pretty much free reign (EEO aside) to pick who they want, so your performance ratings only determine whether you get a 3.25% or 3.5% raise next year, and have nothing whatsoever to do with your future promotions / opportunities.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scarlet
    replied
    We're starting to work on our objectives for 2022, even though by the time they're done 2022 will be 1/6 complete. My manager forwarded out her objectives. Ours are supposed to cascade down. And they're all high level vague things. I have a hard time creating mine because my work is very tactical, logistics oriented and it doesn't translate to those types of objectives. So when it comes to for a review I have a hard time tying the work I actually do to the objectives I made up. How do you guys do it where you work?

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post

    If on salary no you wouldn't be if using any of those 240 hours didn't change the total gross pay during the year. The only way that would be true is if you could take PTO despite working full hours and it resulted in a bump in gross payout = to the # of claimed PTO hours x fixed salary/2,080. I don't know of any company that pays salaried employees as such.
    It certainly is more common in the public sector. I have this argument all the time with a salaried employee from a public utility with whom I play golf. He's also a numbers guy, and admits that he is essentially handing his employer an interest free loan for the boatload of hours he's been allowed to accumulate.

    His argument in favor of doing that is twofold. First, he likes the safety net of the hours because he doesn't necessarily trust himself to not spend the money. Second, in his case the banked hours will be paid out to him based upon his salary at the time he cashes them. So, if he earns a $100,000 salary today when he accrues the hours, but when he cashes them out at retirement he is earning a salary of $120,000, his banked hours have increased in value. Now, there is a question as to whether the rates of his anticipated raises will be higher than, lower than, or equal to what he could get for a return if he took the money now and invested it, but in any event it minimizes the size of the interest free loan he's handing out.

    But again, it is probably much more applicable to your average working stiff getting paid for each hour worked, and banking PTO hours for which they might otherwise receive immediate cash.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post
    I would also point out that if in my first example with the salaried employee, that if the company did permit you to work the whole year, not take PTO, then pay out to you your unused 240 hours at the end of the year or let you bank them for use at a later time, then in that case you'd certainly be making an interest free loan.
    If on salary no you wouldn't be if using any of those 240 hours didn't change the total gross pay during the year. The only way that would be true is if you could take PTO despite working full hours and it resulted in a bump in gross payout = to the # of claimed PTO hours x fixed salary/2,080. I don't know of any company that pays salaried employees as such.

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post

    You're still not making the point you think you are. The unused PTO I can get paid in February cannot be paid to me earlier unless I take an actual day off and in that case my gross pay to that point didn't change. I am not loaning anything to my company.

    I don't not take days off to carry over time because who the fuck uses 240 (plus access to an additional 80 hours of CTO) hours of PTO in a year? I could take 20 days off in a year and still get 20 days of PTO paid back to me that I DID NOT PAY FOR!
    Ok, I don't really have an interest in continuing to beat this horse long after it's death, especially as I get ready to head out on vacation. But, it occurs to me that we might be talking about two different things here.

    It appears that you may be talking about a situation where you are paid a salary, say $200,000/year, and with that you are given 240 hours of PTO. Now, you get paid your $200,000 for your year's work, but if you want, you can choose not to work up to 240 hours of it. If you choose not to work part of the year, your PTO hours are decreased. If you work the whole year, they are not. But either way you get paid $200,000.

    If you work the whole year, and still have the 240 hours, then maybe your company only lets you hang onto them and will not pay them out to you, but when you leave or retire, you continue on the payroll until such time as you use up your banked PTO. Or maybe you use it up because you are sick.

    That's a pretty common type of plan. If that's the plan, then you aren't giving a loan to the company.

    What I was talking about is a situation where a person works and accrues PTO. They are paid for each hour they work. If they choose not to use their PTO during the year, they are given a couple of options. They can have it paid out, or they can bank it for future use or payout. In that situation, I would argue (and have argued in multiple posts) that it's silly to not have it paid out just to somehow create an employer held savings account for you should you need it in the future. Cash it out and put it in your own account and use it in the future.

    I would also point out that if in my first example with the salaried employee, that if the company did permit you to work the whole year, not take PTO, then pay out to you your unused 240 hours at the end of the year or let you bank them for use at a later time, then in that case you'd certainly be making an interest free loan.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

    I'm referring to instances where you can carry over PTO and get paid out for it later. If your employer doesn't allow you do do that, then it wouldn't apply.
    You're still not making the point you think you are. The unused PTO I can get paid in February cannot be paid to me earlier unless I take an actual day off and in that case my gross pay to that point didn't change. I am not loaning anything to my company.

    I don't not take days off to carry over time because who the fuck uses 240 (plus access to an additional 80 hours of CTO) hours of PTO in a year? I could take 20 days off in a year and still get 20 days of PTO paid back to me that I DID NOT PAY FOR!
    Last edited by Slap Shot; 02-15-2022, 10:11 PM.

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  • MissThundercat
    replied
    I'm not sure what the PTO policy is for my company, but I'm sure it's irrelevant, considering this company has a ridiculous turnover rate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

    I'm referring to instances where you can carry over PTO and get paid out for it later. If your employer doesn't allow you do do that, then it wouldn't apply.
    Yeah I don’t know of any who do that, personally. They probably exist

    Leave a comment:


  • Scarlet
    replied
    Holding off the need for a major work vent till I have more clarification but a quick comment from the head of my team has got me a bit out of sorts. She may be moving one of the parts of my position somewhere else. I've had this responsibility for about nine years, I really enjoy it, I'm really good at it, many people in the company are aware of it. If this moves, I may look into moving with it. However, I think there will need to be some additional conversation about it before I say anything. Not the way I wanted to start out my morning.

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post

    I'm not understanding this suggestion. How does one "take PTO" over and above one's gross salary?

    If use 8 hours of PTO my gross for that pay period is the exact same as if I had taken 0 hours.
    I'm referring to instances where you can carry over PTO and get paid out for it later. If your employer doesn't allow you do do that, then it wouldn't apply.

    Leave a comment:


  • St. Clown
    replied
    We can carry over up to 40 hours, but those hours must then be used by March 15 or the remaining hours are forfeited. With being short-staffed for most of the year, there were limitations on how many of us could be on PTO at a given time. We were all scheduling weird mid-week days at the end of the year just to get under that forty-hour limit.

    Leave a comment:


  • BassAle
    replied
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

    Yeah, I guess it's not like there is a third option where you take the money, then set it aside as a reserve in case something unexpected happens.
    what the fuck does this even mean? They're talking not burning through all your paid time off in case you need to take some time off for an unforeseen event.

    Leave a comment:

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