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  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Swansong View Post

    I don't know that we need to completely re-define the work day on a macro level just because some businesses/sectors treat their employees like crap.
    The work day is already in the process of being transformed, and not necessarily for the benefit of employees (although some of them seem to think otherwise).

    There are very specific rules that have been in place for a long time regarding the "work day." You show up for work, and basically as soon as you start working, the clock starts ticking. For some jobs, that require prep time such as putting on certain clothes or equipment, the work day started even a little earlier, when you started prepping. When you stop working (and are free to leave) the clock stops ticking.

    If, during the work day, you were forced to travel, the clock ticks. Travel before or after you are working is not on the clock unless it is outside of the normal travel requirements.

    Those have been the basic rules that everyone has operated under for decades.

    Mobile computers, and especially cellphones, started the change. The question became, what if you are answering emails at 10 pm or 3 am? If an hourly worker, the employer may be on the hook for that, so they might try to implement rules.

    Now, employers are starting to figure out that they can save a boatload of money on utilities, rent and other overhead by letting employees pay for it themselves in their own homes or apartments. The problem is, when your work is at home, you are always at work.

    It'll be interesting to see how the rules evolve, if at all, to address this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    The only positive I see in paying for commuting is may stop outward sprawl, so better for the environment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scarlet
    replied
    I agree with Swansong about paying employees for commuting time. People live where they want to live and that's their choice or need, wherever they choose to work. I do think, though, that if I commute into the office, once I leave the office, I'm done for the day. No checking email on the way home, no logging back in when I get home. Because I have to commute, my time at home is my time. When I travel, though, that's another story. As soon as I leave my place, everything I do is on the company. Meaning if I have a 7:00am flight, my transportation to the airport (cab, Uber, parking of my personal car), my meals (too early to catch breakfast so I grab coffee and a donut), a bottle of water (since I can't bring my own through security) - that is all expensable in my opinion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Swansong
    replied
    I think making companies pay for employee commuting time is a terrible idea. They simply won't hire people outside a small area, and in cities that will substantially drive up already wildly inflating housing costs. Someone who can barely afford to live in Brooklyn that takes the train into Manhattan is going to ... what? Suddenly find the money to live there? There are a million problems with this idea.


    I don't know that we need to completely re-define the work day on a macro level just because some businesses/sectors treat their employees like crap.

    Leave a comment:


  • RaceBoarder
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    Yeah, I had no idea either. What fucking bull****.

    I saw an interesting take on Twitter. Your clock should start the second you leave your front door. It incentivizes big corps to push for housing closer to jobs. Now, I'm not a huge fan of that in my field because ei don't want to live effing anywhere close to dense industrial, but I like the idea in principle.

    Either way, it should be illegal to not pay someone for time on site or travel time between sites or non-resident locations.
    Travel time is something that is currently being brought up in regards to Sports Officials (kids/high school) and their pay rate and how it's not enough.

    I'd be curious to see how traffic would play a part in this. For example, I can make it to Downtown Chicago in about 45-50 minutes with zero traffic. During rush hour, that can easily double in bad weather or a particularly bad traffic day.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Jimjamesak View Post
    TIL Flight Attendants don’t get paid when the plane is on the ground.

    The folks in the comments I’ve seen online are right, unionize and get back pay. What BS.
    Yeah, I had no idea either. What fucking bull****.

    I saw an interesting take on Twitter. Your clock should start the second you leave your front door. It incentivizes big corps to push for housing closer to jobs. Now, I'm not a huge fan of that in my field because ei don't want to live effing anywhere close to dense industrial, but I like the idea in principle.

    Either way, it should be illegal to not pay someone for time on site or travel time between sites or non-resident locations.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichVandal
    replied
    Got a note this morning that we are cutting a few hundred engineers at work.

    Good thing I'm retiring Friday.

    And a friend of mine was told this morning that he's also retiring this Friday.

    Leave a comment:


  • MissThundercat
    replied
    Last night as part of an assignment, I did a deep dive on the link between ADHD/Autism and employment issues. Without even modest support and understanding, the TL;DR of all my research is:

    Leela: I can't see anything; are we boned?
    Bender: Yeah, we're boned.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    I always knew that and could never believe it.

    insane that had been that way. The others better follow suit or they’ll be seeing some attrition

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimjamesak
    replied
    TIL Flight Attendants don’t get paid when the plane is on the ground.

    The folks in the comments I’ve seen online are right, unionize and get back pay. What BS.

    Leave a comment:


  • MissThundercat
    replied
    Originally posted by psych View Post

    I wouldn’t say broke, but there have been many times I have left work frustrated and mentally exhausted. The population I work most with right now is adolescent substance (ab)users, ranging anywhere from a kid getting caught smoking weed (remember where I live), to kids who’ve been brought back more than once after OD’ing on fentanyl (again with where I live). You’d think dying once or twice would humble someone. Nah. Most of them are spoiled, selfish, entitled a—holes who you do everything for, and then the one time you say no, you’re the most worthless, piece of fucking sh-t staff they ever worked with. I expect it from them, I love them anyways, and I have a thick skin, but being told by multiple patients you fucking suck does wear on you sometimes. I just remind myself they aren’t mentally healthy, they need my help, and most of them have awful, and/or non-existent home lives. I also make sure I am taking good care of myself in all facets at home. If you’re not in a good headspace, your patience for your patients will not be there when it needs to be.
    I am certain you have empathy and a thicker skin than most of us. Even if that woman was all over your a— the other night, you are still providing her a quality of life she wouldn’t have without you. She may not ever thank you for it, but you are. Think where some of those people would be if your group home didn’t exist. Once you get your advanced degree, the experience you’re getting now will be invaluable. You got this.
    Today, she started again and I accepted that some days, I'm just gonna have to be a big meanie.

    Leave a comment:


  • psych
    replied
    Originally posted by MissThundercat View Post
    Question for psych and others who have worked in similar situations:

    Ever dealt with an incident that broke you?

    Last night at my job, I had a resident in behavior protocol for over three hours. She was screaming at us, spitting on us, said "f you" frequently to us, banged on the office windows hard to get our attention, etc. She does this often and I agree with other coworkers who believe this person should be transferred to a home where they are equipped to deal with behaviors like this.

    By the time she finished, I barely had the energy to finish wiping down the kitchen or finish charting.
    I wouldn’t say broke, but there have been many times I have left work frustrated and mentally exhausted. The population I work most with right now is adolescent substance (ab)users, ranging anywhere from a kid getting caught smoking weed (remember where I live), to kids who’ve been brought back more than once after OD’ing on fentanyl (again with where I live). You’d think dying once or twice would humble someone. Nah. Most of them are spoiled, selfish, entitled a—holes who you do everything for, and then the one time you say no, you’re the most worthless, piece of fucking sh-t staff they ever worked with. I expect it from them, I love them anyways, and I have a thick skin, but being told by multiple patients you fucking suck does wear on you sometimes. I just remind myself they aren’t mentally healthy, they need my help, and most of them have awful, and/or non-existent home lives. I also make sure I am taking good care of myself in all facets at home. If you’re not in a good headspace, your patience for your patients will not be there when it needs to be.
    I am certain you have empathy and a thicker skin than most of us. Even if that woman was all over your a— the other night, you are still providing her a quality of life she wouldn’t have without you. She may not ever thank you for it, but you are. Think where some of those people would be if your group home didn’t exist. Once you get your advanced degree, the experience you’re getting now will be invaluable. You got this.

    Leave a comment:


  • MissThundercat
    replied
    Originally posted by LynahFan View Post

    Wow - didn’t realize you worked with corporate VPs…. ;-)
    Worse. Direct care.

    Leave a comment:


  • LynahFan
    replied
    Originally posted by MissThundercat View Post
    Question for psych and others who have worked in similar situations:

    Ever dealt with an incident that broke you?

    Last night at my job, I had a resident in behavior protocol for over three hours. She was screaming at us, spitting on us, said "f you" frequently to us, banged on the office windows hard to get our attention, etc. She does this often and I agree with other coworkers who believe this person should be transferred to a home where they are equipped to deal with behaviors like this.

    By the time she finished, I barely had the energy to finish wiping down the kitchen or finish charting.
    Wow - didn’t realize you worked with corporate VPs…. ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • MissThundercat
    replied
    Question for psych and others who have worked in similar situations:

    Ever dealt with an incident that broke you?

    Last night at my job, I had a resident in behavior protocol for over three hours. She was screaming at us, spitting on us, said "f you" frequently to us, banged on the office windows hard to get our attention, etc. She does this often and I agree with other coworkers who believe this person should be transferred to a home where they are equipped to deal with behaviors like this.

    By the time she finished, I barely had the energy to finish wiping down the kitchen or finish charting.

    Leave a comment:

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