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  • RENCEB
    replied
    Originally posted by MichVandal View Post
    Well, it's official. I'm retired.

    And I'm quite happy. Especially in the context of so many friends who also retired today, but didn't want to.
    Congrats!

    That makes 2 of us on the same day. Last e-mail sent on Friday @ 4:58. Original plan was end of March, but I stayed 1 additional month out of the goodness of my heart. There no truth to the rumor that Friday's plunge in the stock market is in any way related to our retirement news.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by MichVandal View Post

    Pretty darned nice, so far. It's been all of 2 hours, and I'm still smiling.
    Congrats!!!!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • MissThundercat
    replied
    A little help, please:

    I have painful hardware in my right foot. It's pushing up against the skin and another surgery will be needed.

    I am attempting to figure out options, considering I'm not eligible for FMLA and I have virtually no PTO.

    ​I know my company allows people to donate PTO, but it's a messed up policy.

    Thinking of hobbling away and looking for a job where I can do most of my work sitting.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichVandal
    replied
    Originally posted by unofan View Post

    I've got 17.5 years til I hit the rule of 88 and can retire with a full pension.
    Theoretically, our number was 85, and I hit that sometime in May or June, but thankfully, once you hit 30, that's the trump card. And that was 2 months ago- I waited until my wife retired- which is next week.

    Leave a comment:


  • unofan
    replied
    Originally posted by Proud2baLaker View Post
    I'm 38 years old and I am already looking forward to retirement.
    I've got 17.5 years til I hit the rule of 88 and can retire with a full pension.

    Leave a comment:


  • Proud2baLaker
    replied
    I'm 38 years old and I am already looking forward to retirement.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichVandal
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Congratulations. You are free. What's it like?
    Pretty darned nice, so far. It's been all of 2 hours, and I'm still smiling.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by MichVandal View Post
    Well, it's official. I'm retired.

    And I'm quite happy. Especially in the context of so many friends who also retired today, but didn't want to.
    Congratulations. You are free. What's it like?

    Leave a comment:


  • MichVandal
    replied
    Well, it's official. I'm retired.

    And I'm quite happy. Especially in the context of so many friends who also retired today, but didn't want to.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    The other positive is people are paid for their suffering.
    I mean they’ll be cooking or drowning or starving to death so sure

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
    The only positive I see in paying for commuting is may stop outward sprawl, so better for the environment.
    The other positive is people are paid for their suffering.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichVandal
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    This was more or less the point of what the poster was trying to get at. Higher density urban environments with comprehensive public transit are incredibly energy efficient on a per-person basis.

    I still prefer living in the burbs. Which is why I liked the concept in principle (duh) but I don't think it's really workable.

    With regards to when the clock starts, it's the second you enter the outer gates. Not when you're prepping, when you're on company property.
    While highly dense urban homes make sense in many aspects, the one that we universally fail at is equity. The low wage workers in the billionaire's buildings always pay more for horrible conditions. Maintenance, janitorial, food making, even teachers, etc. they are never honestly though about in high dense living. So they always end up living farther away, spending more time and energy getting to wherever, etc.

    At least sprawl has limited *some* of that.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
    The only positive I see in paying for commuting is may stop outward sprawl, so better for the environment.
    This was more or less the point of what the poster was trying to get at. Higher density urban environments with comprehensive public transit are incredibly energy efficient on a per-person basis.

    I still prefer living in the burbs. Which is why I liked the concept in principle (duh) but I don't think it's really workable.

    With regards to when the clock starts, it's the second you enter the outer gates. Not when you're prepping, when you're on company property.

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Swansong View Post

    I don't know that we need to completely re-define the work day on a macro level just because some businesses/sectors treat their employees like crap.
    The work day is already in the process of being transformed, and not necessarily for the benefit of employees (although some of them seem to think otherwise).

    There are very specific rules that have been in place for a long time regarding the "work day." You show up for work, and basically as soon as you start working, the clock starts ticking. For some jobs, that require prep time such as putting on certain clothes or equipment, the work day started even a little earlier, when you started prepping. When you stop working (and are free to leave) the clock stops ticking.

    If, during the work day, you were forced to travel, the clock ticks. Travel before or after you are working is not on the clock unless it is outside of the normal travel requirements.

    Those have been the basic rules that everyone has operated under for decades.

    Mobile computers, and especially cellphones, started the change. The question became, what if you are answering emails at 10 pm or 3 am? If an hourly worker, the employer may be on the hook for that, so they might try to implement rules.

    Now, employers are starting to figure out that they can save a boatload of money on utilities, rent and other overhead by letting employees pay for it themselves in their own homes or apartments. The problem is, when your work is at home, you are always at work.

    It'll be interesting to see how the rules evolve, if at all, to address this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    The only positive I see in paying for commuting is may stop outward sprawl, so better for the environment.

    Leave a comment:

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