Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The States: Where We Wish Texas Would Secede Already

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • unofan
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    They aren't a New England town meeting, they're the parties forcing the results they want.
    I only participated in the Iowa caucuses once (2 years ago), but the irony that you can say that when Iowa went for Obama over Hillary in 2008 and Buttegeig over Sanders/Biden in 2020 is palpable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fighting Sioux 23
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    You certainly know more about CO than I, as I have only been in Colorado Springs. I've not even been to Denver. My impression from The Industry's presence in places like Aurora and Colorado Springs is the suburbs are megachurch country club Cheney Republican, other than Boulder. I did not realize CO had a large Latino population -- are they rural farm workers, and are they Dems? Are they unionized or fighting for it like NV? Maybe CO could be a possibility after all. it's the right size, since the other choice TX is too big.
    Colorado Springs up to about Castle Rock is pretty conservative, with a pretty large "megachurch" type presence (along with a very large military presence). As you noted, Cheney Republicans. I believe Douglas County (where Castle Rock is located, along with a portion of Parker) was the "richest county in America" for a period of time. I'm not sure if it still is, or where it ranks nationally, but it is still probably the wealthiest area of Colorado.

    Eastern plains Colorado is hyper-conservative...your Trump/Gun-Humpers.

    Western Colorado is fairly libertarian; however, there is a mix of gun-humpers (think Boebert).

    Denver Metro and Aurora (also part of the Denver metro) are pretty liberal (Aurora has changed considerably over the past decade or so...it used to be pretty conservative). Boulder is hyper-liberal. Fort Collins is a mix.

    As for the Latino population, it constitutes about 1/5 of the state's population as a whole, predominately found along the Front Range (Fort Collins down to Pueblo). Latinos are split about 70/30 Dem vs Republican.

    Unions in Colorado are almost non-existent...probably somewhere north of 5% but less than 10%.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    My picks from those are GA and NV.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Fighting Sioux 23 View Post
    As a Colorado citizen, I agree with your assessment to some extent. Colorado is very white, but about 1/4 of the white population is Hispanic. It's certainly not as diverse as Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, or California. However, it's not like it's Iowa or New Hampshire. Ultimately, for the "West" primary, I'd prefer one of the more diverse purple states (Arizona, Nevada, or New Mexico).
    You certainly know more about CO than I. I have only been in Colorado Springs. I've not even been to Denver. My impression from The Industry's presence in places like Aurora and Colorado Springs is the suburbs, other than Boulder, are megachurch country club Cheney Republican. I did not realize CO had a large Latino population -- are they rural farm workers, and are they Dems? Are they unionized or fighting for it like NV? Maybe CO could be a possibility after all. t's the right size, since the other choice TX is too big.
    Last edited by Kepler; 08-05-2022, 04:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fighting Sioux 23
    replied
    I looked it up. 16 states (plus Puerto Rico) applied:

    Colorado
    Connecticut
    Delaware
    Georgia
    Illinois
    Iowa
    Maryland
    Michigan
    Minnesota
    Nebraska
    Nevada
    New Hampshire
    New Jersey
    Oklahoma
    South Carolina
    Washington

    That's who to choose from (at least for the 2024 cycle).

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X