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USCHO Music Thread: We All Have A Crush On Shirley Manson

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post

    Ok? I mean if you want remain cryptic with your grudge be my guest.
    Stipe and Merchant had a fraught relationship. At times subsequently she has characterized it as abusive, at other times she's said he is a friend. Stipe is a well known dou-chenozzle so I don't care for him in general, and I would not be at all surprised to find he's a predator and gaslighter who is abusive and then convinces the victim it's her own fault.

    But I might not feel that way if REM hadn't gone to sh-t after their first 3 albums and disappeared up Stipe's as-shole (c.f. Genesis-Collins, Pink Floyd-Waters, The Who-Townshend, etc...)

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  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    That's one way of putting it.
    Ok? I mean if you want remain cryptic with your grudge be my guest.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post

    Wasn't he a big fan of hers?
    That's one way of putting it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Amber will love that album. There are good tracks on it and my god Merchant's voice is heaven.

    Just another reason Michael Stipe's going to hell.
    Wasn't he a big fan of hers?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post
    Live at Leeds is tremendous.

    On a completely different level I listened to 10,000 Maniacs' In My Tribe for the first time in probably (25?) years and it actually held up. It's not earth shattering, but it's a more real record to me than say anything Edie Brickell ever made. I admit there may be a nostalgia effect in play as that was a wonderful time to be alive, but the overall messages and themes are every bit as applicable today.

    Shout out to Amber as well - if you've not heard this I think you might like it.
    Amber will love that album. There are good tracks on it and my god Merchant's voice is heaven.

    Just another reason Michael Stipe's going to hell.
    Last edited by Kepler; 02-28-2021, 05:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Live at Leeds is tremendous.

    On a completely different level I listened to 10,000 Maniacs' In My Tribe for the first time in probably (25?) years and it actually held up. It's not earth shattering, but it's a more real record to me than say anything Edie Brickell ever made. I admit there may be a nostalgia effect in play as that was a wonderful time to be alive, but the overall messages and themes are every bit as applicable today.

    Shout out to Amber as well - if you've not heard this I think you might like it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by walrus View Post

    Live at Leeds is all the fragile beauty I want from the Who.
    That is my favorite Who album.

    Aint nothin' fragile about it tho. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • walrus
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Obviously. But the definitive version (indeed, the only tolerable version) is the Who off Odds & Sods. Even their other versions as a band sucked, albeit not as loathsomely as that Grace Jones cosplayer.

    By the way that O&S version is a masterpiece -- easily one of my favorite Who songs. The guitar and drums are incredible in particular.

    It's a classic case of a Who song that has fragile beauty. Like "Red, Blue and Grey." And like it, obscure. It's everything people try to make "Behind Blue Eyes" ("Behind Blue Eyes" sucks).

    It's funny, I thought it was much earlier than it is.
    Live at Leeds is all the fragile beauty I want from the Who.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post

    Who do you think wrote it? While technically you're correct but it was Pete performing solo this instance.
    Obviously. But the definitive version (indeed, the only tolerable version) is the Who off Odds & Sods. Even their other versions as a band sucked, albeit not as loathsomely as that Grace Jones cosplayer.

    By the way that O&S version is a masterpiece -- easily one of my favorite Who songs. The guitar and drums are incredible in particular.

    It's a classic case of a Who song that has fragile beauty. Like "Red, Blue and Grey." And like it, obscure. It's everything people try to make "Behind Blue Eyes" ("Behind Blue Eyes" sucks).

    It's funny, I thought it was much earlier than it is.
    Last edited by Kepler; 02-27-2021, 10:01 PM.

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  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    To be a stickler ("Actually...") that is a Who song.
    Who do you think wrote it? While technically you're correct but it was Pete performing solo this instance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post
    Pete Townsend is so pure and easy
    To be a stickler ("Actually...") that is a Who song.

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  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Leon Bridges is so smooth

    Lemon Jelly is so cool

    Pete Townsend is so pure and easy

    Oingo Boingo is so ***

    Leave a comment:


  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Been listening to Stories by the city, Stories by the sea from PJ Harvey today. Forgot how great that and she is for a bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    This is really good. It's not a hit piece, either. It takes the music seriously. (OK, except Cardi B.)

    And it's a good listen to music I would never have gone near with a ten foot pole.

    Now, will I listen to any of those artists ever again? Maybe The Weekend. But still, speaking as someone who believes popular music peaked in 1960, popular film peaked in 1940, and popular literature peaked in 1620, it was nice to rub shoulders with people who weren't corpses, for a change.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Billy Cobham.

    Fusion drummer from 50 years ago. He defies gravity. The hat tip was Rick Beato's breakdown of Genesis' Dance on a Volcano which is, as is typical with Beato, fascinating.

    Highly recommended. The funky 70s music he backs is dated and cheesy but my god the drumming is godlike.

    Listen to the final 60 seconds of "Stratus." Go ahead, try and count with that, I dare you.

    Leave a comment:

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