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  • Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post

    IT is a value-add if it's supporting critical business services (and in almost all hospitals today, it is).
    LOL. I've been an IT Professional since 1996. It's not value add, it's not customer service driven. At best it's overhead like electricity. Nothing more, nothing less. Since 1996 IT has done more to destroy the planet, and workplace than it has done to improve it.
    **NOTE: The misleading post above was brought to you by Reynold's Wrap and American Steeples, makers of Crosses.

    Originally Posted by dropthatpuck-Scooby's a lost cause.
    Originally Posted by First Time, Long Time-Always knew you were nothing but a troll.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by ScoobyDoo View Post

      LOL. I've been an IT Professional since 1996. It's not value add, it's not customer service driven. At best it's overhead like electricity. Nothing more, nothing less. Since 1996 IT has done more to destroy the planet, and workplace than it has done to improve it.
      Well, to be fair- it is a self sustaining industry. It creates a disjointed, decentralized, convoluted work stream that reinvents itself continuously in ways that have nothing to do with functionality for the person using it. Add in all the glitches, errors, loss or change of functions with each new 'improvement' and the folks in IT have a guaranteed job. The worker bees get to have increased work load, redundancy, while listening to people tell them the system streamlines, simplifies and allows less errors

      *maybe not true for some industries but the medical side research showing increased work load, decreased productivity and no statistical improvement for outcomes. Now if you are data mining.....

      Comment


      • Originally posted by leswp1 View Post

        Well, to be fair- it is a self sustaining industry. It creates a disjointed, decentralized, convoluted work stream that reinvents itself continuously in ways that have nothing to do with functionality for the person using it. Add in all the glitches, errors, loss or change of functions with each new 'improvement' and the folks in IT have a guaranteed job. The worker bees get to have increased work load, redundancy, while listening to people tell them the system streamlines, simplifies and allows less errors
        Welcome to Consulting!
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        • Originally posted by leswp1 View Post

          Well, to be fair- it is a self sustaining industry. It creates a disjointed, decentralized, convoluted work stream that reinvents itself continuously in ways that have nothing to do with functionality for the person using it. Add in all the glitches, errors, loss or change of functions with each new 'improvement' and the folks in IT have a guaranteed job. The worker bees get to have increased work load, redundancy, while listening to people tell them the system streamlines, simplifies and allows less errors

          *maybe not true for some industries but the medical side research showing increased work load, decreased productivity and no statistical improvement for outcomes. Now if you are data mining.....
          I agree 100%. The fact that the two careers I have had in my life are both completely irrelevant to creating anything of substance in the World saddens me greatly. Too late to change again now. I just don't have the energy or the wherewithal to change again.
          **NOTE: The misleading post above was brought to you by Reynold's Wrap and American Steeples, makers of Crosses.

          Originally Posted by dropthatpuck-Scooby's a lost cause.
          Originally Posted by First Time, Long Time-Always knew you were nothing but a troll.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Kepler View Post

            Welcome to Consulting!
            SAP consultants are the blurst. Almost every rollout goes like this

            1. Hire consultants
            2. Plan for 2 years
            3. First roll out is a disaster
            4. Push back dates a year, get informed you're 50% over budget
            5. Second rollout is a disaster
            6. Fire every ****ing one of the consultants
            7. Delay everything 2-3 more years, double or triple the budget.
            8. Attempt to survive the next 5 years
            9. Spend the next twenty years healing scars and PTSD from your employees who went through it and stayed with you
            Code:
            As of 9/21/10:         As of 9/13/10:
            College Hockey 6       College Football 0
            BTHC 4                 WCHA FC:  1
            Originally posted by SanTropez
            May your paint thinner run dry and the fleas of a thousand camels infest your dead deer.
            Originally posted by bigblue_dl
            I don't even know how to classify magic vagina smoke babies..
            Originally posted by Kepler
            When the giraffes start building radio telescopes they can join too.
            He's probably going to be a superstar but that man has more baggage than North West

            Comment


            • Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

              SAP consultants are the blurst. Almost every rollout goes like this

              1. Hire consultants
              2. Plan for 2 years
              3. First roll out is a disaster
              4. Push back dates a year, get informed you're 50% over budget
              5. Second rollout is a disaster
              6. Fire every ****ing one of the consultants
              7. Delay everything 2-3 more years, double or triple the budget.
              8. Attempt to survive the next 5 years
              9. Spend the next twenty years healing scars and PTSD from your employees who went through it and stayed with you
              Perfect. I am going to use this if it's ok.
              **NOTE: The misleading post above was brought to you by Reynold's Wrap and American Steeples, makers of Crosses.

              Originally Posted by dropthatpuck-Scooby's a lost cause.
              Originally Posted by First Time, Long Time-Always knew you were nothing but a troll.

              Comment


              • It's not my primary role, but I do some consulting and I'm sorry if some of them hurt you.

                Yet if your company feels it necessary to seek assistance perhaps the issue isn't on the consultant's side.
                Last edited by Slap Shot; 01-01-2024, 09:19 AM.

                Comment


                • Driving through Rockford, MI yesterday, saw a sign that said "make our city a sanctuary city for the unborn."

                  Then again, Rockford/Sparta is so red it's burgundy.
                  Facebook: bcowles920 Instagram: missthundercat01
                  "One word frees us from the weight and pain of this life. That word is love."- Socrates
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                  • Originally posted by Slap Shot View Post
                    It's not my primary role, but I do some consulting and I'm sorry if some of them hurt you.

                    Yet if your company feels it necessary to seek assistance perhaps the issue isn't on the consultant's side.
                    There are three major components of every solution - people, process, and technology. The platform is always the easiest thing to blame.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by ScoobyDoo View Post

                      Perfect. I am going to use this if it's ok.
                      Absolutely
                      Code:
                      As of 9/21/10:         As of 9/13/10:
                      College Hockey 6       College Football 0
                      BTHC 4                 WCHA FC:  1
                      Originally posted by SanTropez
                      May your paint thinner run dry and the fleas of a thousand camels infest your dead deer.
                      Originally posted by bigblue_dl
                      I don't even know how to classify magic vagina smoke babies..
                      Originally posted by Kepler
                      When the giraffes start building radio telescopes they can join too.
                      He's probably going to be a superstar but that man has more baggage than North West

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post

                        There are three major components of every solution - people, process, and technology. The platform is always the easiest thing to blame.
                        True. Very true.
                        **NOTE: The misleading post above was brought to you by Reynold's Wrap and American Steeples, makers of Crosses.

                        Originally Posted by dropthatpuck-Scooby's a lost cause.
                        Originally Posted by First Time, Long Time-Always knew you were nothing but a troll.

                        Comment


                        • I guess I'm just going strongly disagree on healthcare IT. Some struggle, but many embrace it. Early EHRs were bears, but anything remotely modern (i.e. kept up to date within the past decade) is very good. Implementations vary, obviously, and when organizations half *** it by choosing to use multiple systems, well that's dumb and frustrating. There is only one truly enterprise-level EHR - Epic - but it's expensive. Choosing less expensive alternatives for the hospital itself requires yet other EHRs for ambulatory settings. Do they connect properly? Does data seamlessly flow between them? Maybe... but even then, the EHR itself is fine, it's the interconnectivity that's lacking.


                          Regarding SAP... yeesh. Look, it's a decent enough application. The problem, in my experience, (one implementation in last career, and my ol lady is going through one now at her company) comes from half-baked planning and the fact that they're often trying to combine many, many, many sources of data that are an absolute mess. SAP requires discrete data fields for almost everything and if your legacy database combined things... well. Good luck!
                          I gotta little bit of smoke and a whole lotta wine...

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by MissThundercat View Post
                            Driving through Rockford, MI yesterday, saw a sign that said "make our city a sanctuary city for the unborn."

                            Then again, Rockford/Sparta is so red it's burgundy.
                            Gee, does that mean they are going to provide healthcare, feed and house the pregnant women?

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Swansong View Post
                              I guess I'm just going strongly disagree on healthcare IT. Some struggle, but many embrace it. Early EHRs were bears, but anything remotely modern (i.e. kept up to date within the past decade) is very good. Implementations vary, obviously, and when organizations half *** it by choosing to use multiple systems, well that's dumb and frustrating. There is only one truly enterprise-level EHR - Epic - but it's expensive. Choosing less expensive alternatives for the hospital itself requires yet other EHRs for ambulatory settings. Do they connect properly? Does data seamlessly flow between them? Maybe... but even then, the EHR itself is fine, it's the interconnectivity that's lacking.


                              Regarding SAP... yeesh. Look, it's a decent enough application. The problem, in my experience, (one implementation in last career, and my ol lady is going through one now at her company) comes from half-baked planning and the fact that they're often trying to combine many, many, many sources of data that are an absolute mess. SAP requires discrete data fields for almost everything and if your legacy database combined things... well. Good luck!
                              Sorry. All research shows the amount of time entering data and using EHR systems (all) shows the time suck is 4 times as long as it used to be. It has created jobs- scribes, other excess staff, to deal with the extra work load added. I cannot see my Provider one on one because they have a scribe to assist in the cumbersome documentation process (this is EPIC). I haven't seen a Provider who has any idea what is happening with me for at least 5 yrs- I have to fill them in because the info is not available or is so time consuming to find they don't bother and just ask me. This past yr all 3 of my Providers switched to EPIC. All 3 Practices were a CF. Lost data, lost appt reminders, discussions between staff and Providers on where they were supposed to enter data because there wasnt' a spot where they wanted to put it and they can't find previous data.

                              Watched the ICU the Nurses take less than 5 minutes to collect the info needed re INtake, OUTput, IV fluids hung/what was left at prescribed interval. They then spent 20+ minutes entering it, having to use multiple windows, redundant steps and documentation and needing to confer with each other. They also were talking about how someone else had entered something in a different place that meant the tracking they needed wouldn't work. This process used to take less than 30 seconds to document in a real chart. (Pretty sure this is EPIC).

                              Systems periodically update and lose data when they do. The way the data was entered didn't fit the way people thought it should have been used so doesn't migrate well. None of them take into account the interconnectedness and natural progression of care- there are little modules for everything that need to be opened. It shouldn't take anyone, never mind an ICU nurse, 20+ minutes to document input, output and vital signs after needing to confer with colleagues to make sure they are entering things in the right place.

                              If the system didn't change maybe things would improve with exposure and ability to create predictable work patterns. Unfortunately I can't remember the last time I entered a medical setting for myself or someone else, that they weren't dealing with an update or migration that was causing confusion, wasted time.

                              This last adventure with FIL les showed me- real time- just how scary the missed info, lack of coherence, lack of detail conveyed and lack of continuity due to disjointed way the records are. If we hadn't been supplying correct info he would be dead.

                              Comment


                              • If you're genuinely advocating for a return to paper charts then I truly don't know what to tell you. Probably a story about buggy whips. You can't blame the system for additional required documentation that you were previously exempted from.

                                Implementations are hard. Learning a new system is hard. Data migration is hard. That doesn't mean the system is bad or that the mission isn't worthwhile.


                                Everyone's favorite system - in any industry - is the last one, no matter how much they complained about it when it was in use.
                                I gotta little bit of smoke and a whole lotta wine...

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