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Space exploration: Where do we go from here?

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  • MichVandal
    replied
    Originally posted by aparch View Post
    The Falcon and Falcon heavy continue to be the workhorses of SpaceX.

    It's this goddammed Flash Gordon-eseque Starship design Musk is hellbent on having that continues to struggle.

    Any reports on if he destroyed the launch pad yet again?
    Not that I see, that was one of the small baby step successes. Even though it should not have been a failure in the first place. Curious that they brag about a lack of failure like that.

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  • aparch
    replied
    The Falcon and Falcon heavy continue to be the workhorses of SpaceX.

    It's this goddammed Flash Gordon-eseque Starship design Musk is hellbent on having that continues to struggle.

    Any reports on if he destroyed the launch pad yet again?

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    It would be one thing if you made huge leaps every time after failure, but this isn't that. It's far from that. They don't even have telemetry after something like 7-8 minutes. So even if it had 10+ minutes, without telemetry this thing may as well have flown to Pluto and they'd have learned 1% of what they should have.

    I'm starting to really doubt the competence of even the supposedly competent part of his empire.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichVandal
    replied
    Originally posted by bronconick View Post
    Live updates: SpaceX Starship rocket lost in second test flight (cnn.com)

    The Chinese are going to have a colony on the moon before we go back at this rate. We exploded 10 minutes in instead of 4. Whoopie.
    I know the official answer is that the flight was a success, but, man, are these incredibly expensive successes.

    And it's interesting they set the bar so low for success for the amount of time, effort, and money that goes into a launch like that.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Exploding every time you hit space bar is not ideal in real life.

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  • bronconick
    replied
    Live updates: SpaceX Starship rocket lost in second test flight (cnn.com)

    The Chinese are going to have a colony on the moon before we go back at this rate. We exploded 10 minutes in instead of 4. Whoopie.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Apparently Jupiter's weather repeats and can be predicted, although it is insanely complicated.

    Huh.

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  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Webb telescope spots never-before-seen feature in Jupiter’s atmosphere

    Researchers used Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera, or NIRCam, to takea series of images of Jupiter 10 hours apart, applying four different filters to detect changes in the planet’s atmosphere. Infrared light is invisible to the human eye, and the Webb telescope’s unprecedented capabilities have been used over the past year to spot many newly observed celestial features, such as megaclusters of young stars and unexpected pairs of planetlike objects.

    The astronomers spied a high-speed jet stream in Jupiter’s lower stratosphere, an atmospheric layer about 25 miles (40 kilometers) above the clouds. The jet stream, which sits over the planet’s equator, spans more than 3,000 miles (4,800 kilometers) wide and moves at 320 miles per hour (515 kilometers per hour), or twice the rate seen with sustained winds of a Category 5 hurricane on Earth.


    “This is something that totally surprised us,” said Ricardo Hueso, lead author of the study published October 19 in the journal Nature Astronomy, in a statement. Hueso is a physics lecturer at the University of the Basque Country in Bilbao, Spain.

    “What we have always seen as blurred hazes in Jupiter’s atmosphere now appear as crisp features that we can track along with the planet’s fast rotation,” he said.

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  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Time lapse of Earth's rotation caught with a stabilization camera.

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  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Pleasant surprise greets scientists opening asteroid sample dropped from space

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    What's the UFL of hydrogen? No Hindenburg if you're above that
    Either 40 or 70 percent volume by air, depending whom you ask, but that's at 20 degrees C and atmospheric pressure. This place is the size of 8 Earths so surface level pressure has gotta be pretty crushing.

    I assume it's safe because if it wasn't it would be a very short-lived planet.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    What's the UFL of hydrogen? No Hindenburg if you're above that

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    So JWST potentially found traces of dimethyl sulfide on an exoplanet. Apparently this is a substance produced primarily by life.
    The atmosphere is "mostly hydrogen." Um.



    BTW, by "primarily" they mean that thus far, the only way we know of to produce this is by life. But the only place we know of it is Earth.

    Bonus: it is one of the products of brewing beer.


    Last edited by Kepler; 09-12-2023, 11:52 AM.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by aparch View Post
    They found cabbage?
    No moron. Beets.




    ;-)

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  • aparch
    replied
    They found cabbage?

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