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Space exploration: Where do we go from here?

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  • aparch
    replied
    Originally posted by MichVandal View Post
    Two years into their mission- Perseverance is still rolling- which isn't a huge surprise- it's been pretty common for rovers to last so long; Ingenuity is still flying- two years beyond it's 30 day target.

    Perseverance got a video of a recent flight- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cz6O...hannel=MarsGuy
    https://xkcd.com/695/

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  • MichVandal
    replied
    Two years into their mission- Perseverance is still rolling- which isn't a huge surprise- it's been pretty common for rovers to last so long; Ingenuity is still flying- two years beyond it's 30 day target.

    Perseverance got a video of a recent flight- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cz6O...hannel=MarsGuy

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Whatever time we want it to be.
    Right, but like, how would you pick that time? Is it near infinite since the moon is locked? is it based on the earth's time? Where's the uhhh international dateline? Etc.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    There was a really neat question unrelated to the article but in one of the other advertised articles on the site

    What time is it on the moon?
    Whatever time we want it to be.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    And now before giving you the details of the battle, I bring you a warning: Everyone of you listening to my voice, tell the world, tell this to everybody wherever they are. Watch the skies.
    There was a really neat question unrelated to the article but in one of the other advertised articles on the site

    What time is it on the moon?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    This is what true awe is.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    And now before giving you the details of the battle, I bring you a warning: Everyone of you listening to my voice, tell the world, tell this to everybody wherever they are. Watch the skies.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    Direct imaging of a planet at 87 light years. It is a pretty cool time to be alive.
    jesus ****


    The two teams of astronomers revealed the exoplanet is about four to six times the size of Jupiter and is orbiting AF Leporis at about the same distance as Saturn orbits the sun.
    Edit: Ok, so they suck at writing articles. It's 4-6x the mass of Jupiter but "only" 1.3x the radius. WHich is still a big mother****er. But Wiki reminds me that the universe is insane:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...est_exoplanets

    Largest exoplanet in terms of radius is HD 100546 b @ about SEVEN times the radius of Jupiter. However, that likely includes an accretion disk. So the next on the list is at 3x the radius of Jupiter. Which is still insane.

    In terms of mass, some of these are close enough to almost be considered brown dwarfs.


    Edit 2:
    THis is cool
    https://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltec...Tbls&config=PS
    Last edited by dxmnkd316; 02-23-2023, 12:20 PM.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Direct imaging of a planet at 87 light years. It is a pretty cool time to be alive.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Back of the envelope estimation of frequency of goldilocks zone planets around red dwarfs. tldr: there are a metric buttload.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    https://news.umich.edu/scientists-fi...o-dark-energy/

    Searching through existing data spanning 9 billion years, a University of Michigan physicist and colleagues have uncovered the first evidence of “cosmological coupling”—a newly predicted phenomenon in Einstein’s theory of gravity, possible only when black holes are placed inside an evolving universe.

    Gregory Tarle, U-M professor of physics, and researchers from the University of Hawaii and other institutions across nine countries, studied supermassive black holes at the heart of ancient and dormant galaxies to develop a description of them that agrees with observations from the past decade. Their findings are published in two journal articles, one in The Astrophysical Journal and the other in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

    The first study found that these black holes gain mass over billions of years in a way that can’t easily be explained by standard galaxy and black hole processes, such as mergers or accretion of gas. According to the second paper, the growth in mass of these black holes matches predictions for black holes that not only cosmologically couple, but also enclose vacuum energy—material that results from squeezing matter as much as possible without breaking Einstein’s equations, thus avoiding a singularity.

    With singularities removed, the paper then shows that the combined vacuum energy of black holes produced in the deaths of the universe’s first stars agrees with the measured quantity of dark energy in our universe.
    Kevin Croker's explanation of cosmological coupling:

    “Here’s a toy analogy. You can think of a coupled black hole like a rubber band, being stretched along with the universe as it expands,” said study co-author and University of Hawaii theoretical astrophysicist Kevin Croker. “As it stretches, its energy increases. Einstein’s E = mc2 tells you that mass and energy are proportional, so the black hole mass increases, too.”

    How much the mass increases depends on the coupling strength, a variable the researchers call k.

    “The stiffer the rubber band, the harder it is to stretch, so the more energy when stretched. In a nutshell, that’s k,” Croker said.
    Last edited by Kepler; 02-16-2023, 04:30 AM.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Yeah, I was trying to game out what consequences identical but not instantaneous travel would have.
    I imagine the same as international flights have done for terrestrial culture, health, and business.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    Effectively, yes. Warp 10 episodes in Star Trek.

    but not explored it in the way you were probably looking for.
    Yeah, I was trying to game out what consequences identical but not instantaneous travel would have.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Effectively, yes. Warp 10 episodes in Star Trek.

    but not explored it in the way you were probably looking for.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Has anybody ever seen the following idea in fiction: we eventually achieve FTL, but because of the compounding of speed all interstellar transits take almost the same amount of time. e.g., it takes 100 days to go 4 ly, 101 to go 40 ly, 102 to go 400 ly, etc. Everywhere in the universe is effectively equidistant in time from everywhere else, but any given trip is still a PITA.

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