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  • Scarlet
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    For some people, anxiety makes them eat. Anxiety tends to make me not eat. I had my annual physical right before Christmas. My blood work came back OK, my cholesterol was just under what it would take for me to be on medication so some dietary changes were recommended. Then things started going downhill with my father and over the course of the 3-4 months when he went through one medical crisis after another until he passed away last month, I lost close to 15 pounds. Part of it was missing many meals, part of it was literally not having any appetite. While I certainly wish I was able to lose weight any other way, I would like to see if I can keep this weight off since I was pretty much at my heaviest last year. Now that I'm slowly getting back to normal, I can start back to my regular meal planning.

    As for exercise, I am scheduled to have some surgery next month to repair a torn tendon in my ankle. My doctor told me I shouldn't do anything on it so I haven't been walking. I always seem to start walking more when the weather is nicer but now I can't. I'm wondering if I will lose any more when I am laid up afterwards or if I will gain weight because I will be unable to get up and move. Any thoughts on any kind of exercise I can do that doesn't include walking?

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post
    To add a little more context, it falls into this camp in my clinical practice: I do not think there is enough evidence to actively recommend it to a patient however, I would not dissuade a patient who is interested in doing it (as long as I do not see any clear contraindications). However much of the other things I have mentioned are part of my standard discussion about weight loss.
    Assuming lack of formal experimental evidence either way, can you think of any credible theoretical reason why targeted fasting would be a good strategy? I know that for example in exercise it is recommended that if you want to burn fat it's better to do 2x/t amount of work over t seconds than x/t amount of work over 2t seconds because activity doesn't scale evenly -- the same interval of additional work value done above a higher threshold burns more fat than below that threshold.

    Could fasting have a similar effect, exploiting a "market inefficiency" in how the body deals with lack of energy?

    The rule of thumb I picked up off the street is that the body basically works as your evil demon: it will do bad things to you before it takes your fat supplies. That doesn't seem to make much evolutionary sense to me but I have a loose, quasi-crackpot opinion that processed foods create fats that are very hard to break down whereas natural foods create easy to break down fats. Basically, we turned out bodies into landfills and so we're trapped now.

    But none of that is from science -- it's from the general air of fear and loathing of nutrition. Any MDs or nutritionists out there want to take a swing at what the actual science is?

    Wed, 5/1

    Breakfast: none
    Lunch: Roast chicken brought from home and water: 200

    Cumulative 200 but I assume I won't make it to dinner that low. I will do quite a lot to avoid a hunger headache.
    Last edited by Kepler; 05-01-2019, 01:44 PM.

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  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post
    To add a little more context, it falls into this camp in my clinical practice: I do not think there is enough evidence to actively recommend it to a patient however, I would not dissuade a patient who is interested in doing it (as long as I do not see any clear contraindications). However much of the other things I have mentioned are part of my standard discussion about weight loss.
    The few physicians I know say the same thing- they won’t recommend it, partly due to no real long term studies to show effects

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  • WisconsinWildcard
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by trixR4kids View Post
    Thanks for posting this, I kinda just figured most the gains from doing it were solely due to forcing yourself to eat less by skipping a meal but it's interesting to see that there might be some science to it as indicated in #1. Either way it seems to work for me and it's not that hard to skip a few useless calories in the morning.
    To add a little more context, it falls into this camp in my clinical practice: I do not think there is enough evidence to actively recommend it to a patient however, I would not dissuade a patient who is interested in doing it (as long as I do not see any clear contraindications). However much of the other things I have mentioned are part of my standard discussion about weight loss.

    Leave a comment:


  • trixR4kids
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post
    I "mini fast" myself and I have read most of the literature on the subject (I was at least up to date within the last year). There is a lot of hype and I think over-extension of the data as it suffers from a common problem of a lot of basic research with minimal or flawed clinical data. However I think at this point there are a few things that can be said:

    1. It has reasonable evidence that going 14-18 hours over a 24 hour period with minimal (<100 calories) lowers your A1C (this is the primary reason why I do it)
    2. It is likely not harmful
    3. It may reduce total caloric intake in certain settings
    4. The overall effect on metabolism is complicated and it is probably wise to remain agnostic until better data is presented

    As dx mentioned...you have to be careful to not overeat when you do eat. This can negate the potential weight loss effect. I think one strategy that is successful for me is to step away from eating, or eating much slower, in order to let the feedback from your stomach reach your central hunger centers.
    Thanks for posting this, I kinda just figured most the gains from doing it were solely due to forcing yourself to eat less by skipping a meal but it's interesting to see that there might be some science to it as indicated in #1. Either way it seems to work for me and it's not that hard to skip a few useless calories in the morning.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    I think what this thread best illustrates is there is no magic bullet. You need to throw the pot of spaghetti against the wall and see what sticks.

    It’s also why weight loss is so hard.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slap Shot
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    I also mini-fast (14-20 hours without anything more than water, maybe a cracker or two or nothing at all) and I have dropped a lot of weight without much exercise at all. If I do "gorge" it's at most 1x per week but I am conscious of it - meaning I allow myself the occasional cheat day but I don't overdo it.

    Leave a comment:


  • bostonewe
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    If it weren't for high blood pressure I would consider developing a serious amphetamine addiction. I hear they help you get stuff done around the house.
    I have often considered cocaine for the same reason. There are a few negative side effects that keep me from experimenting.
    Originally posted by Drew S. View Post
    I think that if you’re not below 200 by Election Day you have to vote for Trump! That should be all the motivation you need.
    Drew- this is possibly your best post.
    Also, that is a hell of a motivation.
    Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post
    My problem with food tracking apps for calorie counting is that if you do your own cooking, you have to enter each ingredient and hope it's both in the database and has the numbers entered accurately. It drives me insane trying to pick from the different brands, serving sizes, and nutrition counts of eggs, veggies, crackers, bread, etc. My Fitness Pal is particularly terrible at this, and I inevitably quit using it after a couple of days.
    This has been my experience in the past and why I rarely use them. I haven't found a good substitute, which is irritating.

    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    Hasn't worked with whiskey which has a helluva lot better selling point.
    If something tastes merely annoying (beer, vegetables, melons) you can learn to enjoy it. But when something tastes like actual sh-t (coffee, whiskey, rye, bourbon, scotch, brandy) there's no hope.
    Kep - there is no hope for you based on the bolded words
    Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post
    I "mini fast" myself and I have read most of the literature on the subject (I was at least up to date within the last year). There is a lot of hype and I think over-extension of the data as it suffers from a common problem of a lot of basic research with minimal or flawed clinical data. However I think at this point there are a few things that can be said:

    1. It has reasonable evidence that going 14-18 hours over a 24 hour period with minimal (<100 calories) lowers your A1C (this is the primary reason why I do it)
    2. It is likely not harmful
    3. It may reduce total caloric intake in certain settings
    4. The overall effect on metabolism is complicated and it is probably wise to remain agnostic until better data is presented

    As dx mentioned...you have to be careful to not overeat when you do eat. This can negate the potential weight loss effect. I think one strategy that is successful for me is to step away from eating, or eating much slower, in order to let the feedback from your stomach reach your central hunger centers.
    I have found that alternating one drink of water and one bite of food has helped me eat less over all. It makes meals incredibly slow (compared to previously) - it takes me upwards of 30-45 minutes to eat dinner, but it has become an unconscious habit over the last year after making a conscious effort initially. However, I get to savor the meal more and appreciate what I'm eating, which seems like a good tradeoff.

    Kep - I wish I had some sort of magic advice for you. I have been gaining since college (I passed the 200 mark when I was drinking 5-6 Guinness per sitting 3-5 times a week during college and the first 5 years after and didn't look back for another ** amount of pounds). I (mostly) quit drinking - I drink 16 oz of beer once a week most weeks and try to hit the gym 3-4 times a week for 30 minutes of cardio + light weightlifting. I work nights, which is apparently terrible for your health anyway, and gives you an excuse that you're tired when you don't want to go to the gym It's slowed the gain, but I can't really say that I've lost more than 15lbs. I feel a hell of a lot better though.

    Leave a comment:


  • icehawk
    replied
    Originally posted by MissThundercat View Post
    Food poisoning can help you drop 10-15 lbs in a few days!
    So can a colonoscopy

    Leave a comment:


  • WisconsinWildcard
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by trixR4kids View Post
    I also do intermittent fasting where I don't eat for a number of hours and just drink coffee in the morning, skip breakfast entirely, and don't eat lunch until 1-2 (depends when I wake up and when I ate dinner the night before).
    Originally posted by LynahFan View Post
    I'll offer another shout-out for (mini)fasting. I've heard a couple pop-science podcasts on it, but haven't read the literature.
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    THe only thing I can think of against intermittent fasting is that it tends to lead to gorging. When I'm really hungry, I tend to eat faster than my brain can trigger the "Stop! You're full, fatty" feeling. I also tend to eat "fast" things like snacks.
    I "mini fast" myself and I have read most of the literature on the subject (I was at least up to date within the last year). There is a lot of hype and I think over-extension of the data as it suffers from a common problem of a lot of basic research with minimal or flawed clinical data. However I think at this point there are a few things that can be said:

    1. It has reasonable evidence that going 14-18 hours over a 24 hour period with minimal (<100 calories) lowers your A1C (this is the primary reason why I do it)
    2. It is likely not harmful
    3. It may reduce total caloric intake in certain settings
    4. The overall effect on metabolism is complicated and it is probably wise to remain agnostic until better data is presented

    As dx mentioned...you have to be careful to not overeat when you do eat. This can negate the potential weight loss effect. I think one strategy that is successful for me is to step away from eating, or eating much slower, in order to let the feedback from your stomach reach your central hunger centers.

    Leave a comment:


  • MissThundercat
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by walrus View Post
    Disease works wonders on ones weight.
    Food poisoning can help you drop 10-15 lbs in a few days!

    Leave a comment:


  • walrus
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    The Plan is to claw back to 199 and then sit there until cancer or something helps a brother out.
    Disease works wonders on ones weight.

    Leave a comment:


  • sagard
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by Drew S. View Post
    I only have a couple things I would offer. 1. As others have said it’s going to be very tough to make much progress without more activity. 2. I think the key to eating healthier is planning and preparation which obviously takes time and effort. I don’t think it’s willpower as much as being well prepared.
    First time I have agreed with you 100%. I'm significantly down since Christmas as I've turned over all meal plans to my wife and verify and plan if I'm going to be out on my own.

    Leave a comment:


  • alfablue
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post
    I would say from personal experience that short of adopting an exercise program it'll be pretty tough for you to lose substantial weight without using a "fad" diet. I don't use that term in a derogatory sense because they do work, again from personal experience. You can go carb free or go on the Keto diet (similar to the standard carb free), go on the fasting diet, etc..., and you will lose a lot of weight and you can do so relatively quickly (within a year).

    The problem is staying on that diet. Most of the time it's too easy to slip off of them because frankly it gets tiring eating nothing but protein all the time or not drinking beer or eating pizza.

    My tips to you, again based upon personal experience:

    1. Find a diet you where you can at least tolerate the food for 6-9 months.
    2. Try to get someone to do it with you (spouse or co-worker) because it works better when you have support, and misery loves company.
    3. Once you lose the weight, you will have to make major changes to your lifestyle, either in terms of radically adjusting your diet to eat very sensibly or start exercising, or best of all both.

    You can try to lose weight by counting calories and simply reducing calorie intake. There are some people for whom that's successful, but I think most of us just give up.
    Realistically, weight loss isn't a temporary thing, it's a permanent change in behavior.

    Whatever one decides to do, it has to stick, and not be a punishment.

    (which is why low carb has worked for us- you eat, fill up, and are done. Most carbs, you really don't miss. And at some point, sugar starts to taste pretty bad. So regulating your intake isn't hard)

    Leave a comment:


  • Drew S.
    replied
    Re: Calorie Counting

    I only have a couple things I would offer. 1. As others have said it’s going to be very tough to make much progress without more activity. 2. I think the key to eating healthier is planning and preparation which obviously takes time and effort. I don’t think it’s willpower as much as being well prepared.

    If you do try to get back into tennis the only thing I would say is do not use poly strings. You are asking for arm issues if you do.

    Leave a comment:

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