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POTUS 45.65: I'm Just Here For The Lincoln Project Ads

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  • Handyman
    replied
    If anyone wants to watch what I am doing at my comp most days they are more than welcome. Not sure it will be all that exciting or worth their time.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Sicatoka
    replied
    Originally posted by Handyman View Post
    I bet another of you put tape on your laptop camera so THEY can't watch you...
    Laptop doesn't have a camera. (I didn't spec it.)

    For Teams/Zoom meetings I bought a desk camera with the built-in flap door.


    But nobody would ever do anything untoward, and especially not to a journalist that's won a Edward R. Morrow Award, though their computer.
    Last edited by The Sicatoka; 06-21-2021, 07:03 PM.

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  • Handyman
    replied
    I bet another of you put tape on your laptop camera so THEY can't watch you...

    Leave a comment:


  • The Sicatoka
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    I would only buy this if it were Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Apple, or Amazon (I'm sure I'm missing some here). There aren't many that have the infrastructure.

    On the other hand, if it were local data processing, i'm guessing Apple and Samsung would have seen massive battery drains relative to lab testing and addressed that. It just doesn't seem plausible. Unless the gov't was behind it and gagged them. But again, we're getting into some pretty crazy unproven theories here.
    If I were to do it, I'd do as much local filtering as possible (meaning on device, tucked in apps or OS) to shrink what gets sent back. I'd spool up what was mined and put out a short burst data package on off hours (when traffic is low and the unit is on recharge power, not battery).

    RE: "battery drains relative to lab testing" ... What if the lab testing was done with 'whatever' running so it's just normal baseline battery usage to the end user.
    Last edited by The Sicatoka; 06-21-2021, 06:20 PM.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Drew S. View Post

    We were in the car and I wondered out loud about something very specific. It wasn’t even around buying anything either.

    I was just doing some digging and I don’t think Facebook or Google are doing it, it’s random third party advertisers we’ve never heard of.
    I would only buy this if it were Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Apple, or Amazon (I'm sure I'm missing some here). There aren't many that have the infrastructure.

    On the other hand, if it were local data processing, i'm guessing Apple and Samsung would have seen massive battery drains relative to lab testing and addressed that. It just doesn't seem plausible. Unless the gov't was behind it and gagged them. But again, we're getting into some pretty crazy unproven theories here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Drew S.
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    Because it also tracks by your home internet as well. If two people are using the same home wifi, I'm guessing the profiles are intentionally overlapped.

    It's perfectly reasonable and profitable.
    We were in the car and I wondered out loud about something very specific. It wasn’t even around buying anything either.

    I was just doing some digging and I don’t think Facebook or Google are doing it, it’s random third party advertisers we’ve never heard of.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by The Sicatoka View Post
    Those are the recordings you've authorized Amazon to make. After the wake word. This makes up may a few minutes of recordings per day in an average house. Not the constant stream you're proposing. And it's certainly not streaming all of this 24/7 across hundreds of millions of devices. If this were true, someone by now would have monitored all bandwidth usage through their home network and discovered this constant streaming of data from their devices. It just doesn't happen. This would have been blown wide open, far too many people are watching these devices waiting to write that story.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Sicatoka
    replied
    Originally posted by aparch View Post
    I am honestly surprised that searching Google for "NASCAR driver named Junior" and Martin Truex, Jr. was what appeared first.
    My search was "top nascar drivers 2021". Kyle Larson was too generic so I went with second place, figuring there's not a lot of Martin Truex Jr's running around.

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Drew S. View Post

    A similar thing happened to my wife once when I mentioned something sports related to her and then she started getting ads for the topic in question. She has zero interest in sports and never looks at sports related stuff on her phone. This was way too specific to be randomly generated too.
    Because it also tracks by your home internet as well. If two people are using the same home wifi, I'm guessing the profiles are intentionally overlapped.

    It's perfectly reasonable and profitable.

    Leave a comment:


  • aparch
    replied
    Originally posted by The Sicatoka View Post
    *I had to Google a name because my favorite and only NASCAR name I know, Dick Trickle, is dead.
    I am honestly surprised that searching Google for "NASCAR driver named Junior" and Martin Truex, Jr. was what appeared first.


    [While in my mind, this Tim Wilson song is playing after reading your post.]

    Leave a comment:


  • Drew S.
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    Myth.

    Your ads are built around a profile. They make educated and fairly accurate guesses about you based on your search and browsing history, your location, in store purchases, your friends and their profiles, people you follow on Twitter, etc. When you get enough of that data aggregated, it makes it pretty easy to pick out trends. They probably targeted her because she fit an ad profile NASCAR was trying to reach "Middle age, white, ruralish, conservative, etc"

    Even if that pattern doesn't match, it's almost certainly based on a profile that is somewhat generic that matches her. It ain't hard.
    A similar thing happened to my wife once when I mentioned something sports related to her and then she started getting ads for the topic in question. She has zero interest in sports and never looks at sports related stuff on her phone. This was way too specific to be randomly generated too.

    Leave a comment:


  • FadeToBlack&Gold
    replied
    Call me paranoid, but I'll never have any Amazon Echo or Google Nest voice-activated devices in my house. In the US, if you're a customer of a company they generally don't need your permission to gather quite a bit of your data to use for just about any purposes and store it for any length of time. Even when they do need permission they usually get it in some sneaky way with a bunch of long-winded legalese that encourages you not to read the fine print and just hit the "I Agree" button.

    Now, let's take Amazon Echo. In Michigan we are generally considered to be a one-party state (this was reaffirmed in a recent state court ruling) - if you're party to a private conversation, you don't need any other party's permission to record it yourself, however you cannot have someone else record it on your behalf unless all parties agree. The key word "party" means that in order to record, you must be an acknowledged participant in the discussion - so you can't legally eavesdrop. Where does that leave Amazon if you're a customer who uses their voice-activated products and services? Does simply saying "Hey Alexa..." then legally make them a party to your conversation and only for the amount of time you interact with the Alexa service? Or are they always a party because their Echo devices are present in the house at all times, on standby, with your consent?

    This makes me wonder if the features of Echo/Alexa are more limited in Europe where GDPR regulations are in force.

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  • The Sicatoka
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    You're right. It's far more simple to explain it with a Batman-like network monitoring every conversation on every device in America simultaneously, processing that data, and serving ads all while somehow hiding the massive server farms and bandwidth required to make that all work all of which would have to happen with the thousands of people responsible for developing, implementing, and maintaining that system never spilling their guts to the press.

    Sure thing.
    You're right. Can't happen.

    https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/b...tening-to-you/

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  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by The Sicatoka View Post
    Then that profile is either too generic or really messed up. (Or she's hidin' stars-n-bars behind the stacks of English literature on her shelves.)
    You're right. It's far more simple to explain it with a Batman-like network monitoring every conversation on every device in America simultaneously, processing that data, and serving ads all while somehow hiding the massive server farms and bandwidth required to make that all work all of which would have to happen with the thousands of people responsible for developing, implementing, and maintaining that system never spilling their guts to the press.

    Sure thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Sicatoka
    replied
    Then that profile is either too generic or really messed up. (Or she's hidin' stars-n-bars behind the stacks of English literature on her shelves.)

    Leave a comment:

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