Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Covfefe-19 The 12th Part: The Only Thing Worse Than This New Board Is TrumpVirus2020

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    Also, yikes.
    Sucks to be wrong.

    And to think, they also proved Darwin to be correct. I love unintended consequences…
    Russell Jaslow
    [Former] SUNYAC Correspondent
    U.S. College Hockey Online

    Comment


    • Say it with me, y'all:

      Sea-son-al. Ain't the mask.

      Ain't the plexiglass.

      Aint' any other purportedly-virtuous behavior.

      But it IS time to move on.

      Comment



      • Michigan's hospitalization rate is 5x higher than Florida's right now. Michigan doesn't believe in science.
        Last edited by Jeb2020; 11-25-2021, 10:13 AM.

        Comment


        • https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers....act_id=3949410

          "Vaccine effectiveness of BNT162b2 against infection waned progressively from 92% at day 15-30 to 47% at day 121-180, and from day 211 and onwards NO effectiveness could be detected" Efficacy: 92% => 47% => Zero

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Russell Jaslow View Post

            Sucks to be wrong.

            And to think, they also proved Darwin to be correct. I love unintended consequences…
            Climate Change is hitting them hardest, too.

            Nature finds a way.
            Cornell University
            National Champion 1967, 1970
            ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
            Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

            Comment


            • Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

              Getting cold. Same thing happened last year. Same thing happened before with the flu. Cold climates force everyone inside.
              https://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/05/h...rch/05flu.html

              Flu season in northern latitudes is from November to March, the coldest months. In southern latitudes, it is from May until September. In the tropics, there is not much flu at all and no real flu season.

              There was no shortage of hypotheses. Some said flu came in winter because people are indoors; and children are in school, crowded together, getting the flu and passing it on to their families.

              Others proposed a diminished immune response because people make less vitamin D or melatonin when days are shorter. Others pointed to the direction of air currents in the upper atmosphere. But many scientists were not convinced.

              “We know one of the largest factors is kids in school -- most of the major epidemics are traced to children,” said Dr. Jonathan McCullers, a flu researcher at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. “But that still does not explain wintertime. We don’t see flu in September and October.”

              As for the crowding argument, Dr. McCullers said, “That never made sense.” People work all year round and crowd into buses and subways and planes no matter what the season.

              “We needed some actual data,” Dr. McCullers added.

              But getting data was surprisingly difficult, Dr. Palese said.

              The ideal study would expose people to the virus under different conditions and ask how likely they were to become infected. Such a study, Dr. Palese said, would not be permitted because there would be no benefit to the individuals.

              There were no suitable test animals. Mice can be infected with the influenza virus but do not transmit it. Ferrets can be infected and transmit the virus, but they are somewhat large, they bite and they are expensive, so researchers would rather not work with them.

              To his surprise, Dr. Palese stumbled upon a solution that appeared to be a good second best.

              Reading a paper published in 1919 in the Journal of the American Medical Association on the flu epidemic at Camp Cody in New Mexico, he came upon a key passage: “It is interesting to note that very soon after the epidemic of influenza reached this camp, our laboratory guinea pigs began to die.” At first, the study’s authors wrote, they thought the animals had died from food poisoning. But, they continued, “a necropsy on a dead pig revealed unmistakable signs of pneumonia.”

              Dr. Palese bought some guinea pigs and exposed them to the flu virus. Just as the paper suggested, they got the flu and spread it among themselves. So Dr. Palese and his colleagues began their experiments.

              By varying air temperature and humidity in the guinea pigs’ quarters, they discovered that transmission was excellent at 41 degrees. It declined as the temperature rose until, by 86 degrees, the virus was not transmitted at all.

              The virus was transmitted best at a low humidity, 20 percent, and not transmitted at all when the humidity reached 80 percent.

              The animals also released viruses nearly two days longer at 41 degrees than at a typical room temperature of 68 degrees.

              Flu viruses spread through the air, unlike cold viruses, Dr. Palese said, which primarily spread by direct contact when people touch surfaces that had been touched by someone with a cold or shake hands with someone who is infected, for example.

              Flu viruses are more stable in cold air, and low humidity also helps the virus particles remain in the air. That is because the viruses float in the air in little respiratory droplets, Dr. Palese said. When the air is humid, those droplets pick up water, grow larger and fall to the ground.

              But Dr. Palese does not suggest staying in a greenhouse all winter to avoid the flu. The best strategy, he says, is a flu shot.

              It is unclear why infected animals released viruses for a longer time at lower temperatures. There was no difference in their immune response, but one possibility is that their upper airways are cooler, making the virus residing there more stable.

              Flu researchers said they were delighted to get some solid data at last on flu seasonality.

              “It was great work, and work that needed to be done,” said Dr. Terrence Tumpe, a senior microbiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

              Dr. McCullers said he was pleased to see something convincing on the flu season question.

              “It was a really interesting paper, the first really scientific approach, to answer a classic question that we’ve been debating for years and years,” he said.
              Last edited by Kepler; 11-25-2021, 10:38 AM.
              Cornell University
              National Champion 1967, 1970
              ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
              Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

              Comment


              • Got boosted Monday at the local Meijer. No big deal other than the booster knocked me on my arse for 24h. I found this very surprising as I had zero issues from the first two shots.

                Comment


                • The lower temp/lower humidity hypothesis is also why we think it spreads so easily among hockey teams. Minnesota youth teams provided ample data here

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Russell Jaslow View Post

                    Sucks to be wrong.

                    And to think, they also proved Darwin to be correct. I love unintended consequences…
                    The really sad part is that they constantly see their own kind die off from the virus, and they are so stubborn that they continue to push out the BS stories. If people are that incapable of learning from other people's mistakes, it's pretty clear to me that they won't be capable of producing anything new or interesting because they can't believe other results. It's no wonder that small businesses continue to fail at a consistent rate for the exact same reasons. Or why large companies are constantly doing the same mistakes, both with each other and repeating ones that were failures in their own past.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by MichVandal View Post

                      The really sad part is that they constantly see their own kind die off from the virus, and they are so stubborn that they continue to push out the BS stories. If people are that incapable of learning from other people's mistakes, it's pretty clear to me that they won't be capable of producing anything new or interesting because they can't believe other results. It's no wonder that small businesses continue to fail at a consistent rate for the exact same reasons. Or why large companies are constantly doing the same mistakes, both with each other and repeating ones that were failures in their own past.
                      "Your inability to understand science is not an argument against it."

                      Except for these folks…
                      Russell Jaslow
                      [Former] SUNYAC Correspondent
                      U.S. College Hockey Online

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Russell Jaslow View Post
                        "Your inability to understand science is not an argument against it."
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bhYMnHb5JY
                        Cornell University
                        National Champion 1967, 1970
                        ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
                        Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

                        Comment


                        • So I am not sure if my reaction was based more on the booster or a recent bout of insomnia but yesterday was not very fun. Felt like the back end of a decent cold and off and on my arm hurt. Slept a bit better last night and woke up at about 85%. Arm doesn't hurt but is definitely tight. Very different than either of the original shots.

                          Meanwhile my buddy has two managers at his pizza place (who keep threatening to leave if he doesn't pay them like 60k a year which at his size is ludicrous) not get the shot and caught COVID and have been out of work for 2 weeks now.
                          "It's as if the Drumpf Administration is made up of the worst and unfunny parts of the Cleveland Browns, Washington Generals, and the alien Mon-Stars from Space Jam."
                          -aparch

                          "Scenes in "Empire Strikes Back" that take place on the tundra planet Hoth were shot on the present-day site of Ralph Engelstad Arena."
                          -INCH

                          Of course I'm a fan of the Vikings. A sick and demented Masochist of a fan, but a fan none the less.
                          -ScoobyDoo 12/17/2007

                          Comment


                          • https://twitter.com/thehill/status/1463974036057247748

                            Group of doctors contract COVID-19 following Florida anti-vaccine summit
                            "It's as if the Drumpf Administration is made up of the worst and unfunny parts of the Cleveland Browns, Washington Generals, and the alien Mon-Stars from Space Jam."
                            -aparch

                            "Scenes in "Empire Strikes Back" that take place on the tundra planet Hoth were shot on the present-day site of Ralph Engelstad Arena."
                            -INCH

                            Of course I'm a fan of the Vikings. A sick and demented Masochist of a fan, but a fan none the less.
                            -ScoobyDoo 12/17/2007

                            Comment


                            • Which will let them dig in even more. These people can't give up now, it's been almost 2 years that they have downplayed this pandemic- there's no way they will change their mind, even in death.

                              Comment


                              • The new dominant variant in South Africa is a little worrisome right now. Suspected to be more transmissible and more likely to evade immunity. A few documented cases of Pfizer vaccinated people getting it

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X