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Covfefe-19 The 12th Part: The Only Thing Worse Than This New Board Is TrumpVirus2020

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  • Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    I have a different theory and I'm not being snarky.

    I think ideological blindness can literally make us stupid. It disables the cognitive parts (and/or processes) in our brains that typically distinguish smart from stupid people.

    There's nothing magical about being smart, it's just a gift from the gods like a great fastball or high cheek bones. That means that thing is subject to change under potential stimulae. Trauma is an obvious one: bash a guy in the head with a 2x4 and he's going to drop from Yale to Michigan.

    I hypothesize ideological blindness actually traumatizes the brain and damages people's ability to think. He's not lying, he honestly cannot see because he is suffering from a localized mental incapacity. Surely there has been neurological research to test this and perhaps it fails but it's my hypothesis.
    Plus, he's a UHN fan.
    What kind of cheese are you planning to put on top?

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Kepler View Post

      To be honest that is a low sperm count.
      he said he just had a massage.
      What kind of cheese are you planning to put on top?

      Comment


      • Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post

        A good question. I can speak a bit on it but I would caveat that there are a lot of details that are nuanced that may not translate well.

        Different states do have different requirements that trigger an autopsy. Age, reason noted for death, circumstances surrounding death, level of involvement of medical professionals etc. Ultimately that is the best way to determine the exact cause of death in most cases if in the hands of an experienced and well trained pathologist. It is helpful for record keeping but it is also important learning opportunity. NEJM has a weekly section from Mass General that has countless lessons learned from autopsy.

        Coronary artery disease is very common and we have good ideas of historical rates. Most people with CAD do not have heart attacks. If we start seeing changes in the pattern of patients (which is not too challenging, especially in the setting of a tertiary care facility where one team is caring for all heart attacks or strokes), it is a reasonable assumption the ongoing pandemic is changing that. We have actually seen this, with mild heart attacks and strokes essentially staying home, and an increase in more severe or atypical heart attacks/strokes (like in the young, no other clear co-morbidities).

        Covid-19 is pro-thrombotic, we have learned. It has a high rate of pulmonary embolism, ischemic stroke, heart attack, DVT etc in hospitalized patients and a thrombotic event as the presenting symptom is not that uncommon.

        Ultimately, it comes down to where you die and the physician who cared for you to determine most etiologies of death. If you have a patient with clear signs of Covid-19 infection and a thrombotic event, you are more likely to identify that as an etiology. If it is a positive test but you do not feel it was a large contributor, you may not identify it. The vast majority of physicians, especially the ICU docs that are doing most of this, are great, compassionate professionals. The degree of rampant fraud or incompetence required to drastically change the numbers is near impossible and would require a vast conspiracy of hundreds of thousand individuals.
        What are your thoughts on the PCR test?

        Comment



        • Originally posted by Kepler View Post



          There's nothing magical about being smart, it's just a gift from the gods like a great fastball or high cheek bones. That means that thing is subject to change under potential stimulae. Trauma is an obvious one: bash a guy in the head with a 2x4 and he's going to drop from Yale to Michigan.
          chefs kiss

          Code:
          As of 9/21/10:         As of 9/13/10:
          College Hockey 6       College Football 0
          BTHC 4                 WCHA FC:  1
          Originally posted by SanTropez
          May your paint thinner run dry and the fleas of a thousand camels infest your dead deer.
          Originally posted by bigblue_dl
          I don't even know how to classify magic vagina smoke babies..
          Originally posted by Kepler
          When the giraffes start building radio telescopes they can join too.
          He's probably going to be a superstar but that man has more baggage than North West

          Comment


          • Originally posted by rufus View Post

            he said he just had a massage.
            If repping was still a thing this would win!

            Comment


            • Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post
              Covid-19 is pro-thrombotic, we have learned. It has a high rate of pulmonary embolism, ischemic stroke, heart attack, DVT etc in hospitalized patients and a thrombotic event as the presenting symptom is not that uncommon.
              Interesting, as I just saw this article which seems to back up your experiences.

              https://elemental.medium.com/a-super...d-31cb8eba9d63

              As bradykinin builds up in the body, it dramatically increases vascular permeability. In short, it makes your blood vessels leaky. This aligns with recent clinical data, which increasingly views Covid-19 primarily as a vascular disease, rather than a respiratory one. But Covid-19 still has a massive effect on the lungs. As blood vessels start to leak due to a bradykinin storm, the researchers say, the lungs can fill with fluid. Immune cells also leak out into the lungs, Jacobson’s team found, causing inflammation.

              And Covid-19 has another especially insidious trick. Through another pathway, the team’s data shows, it increases production of hyaluronic acid (HLA) in the lungs. HLA is often used in soaps and lotions for its ability to absorb more than 1,000 times its weight in fluid. When it combines with fluid leaking into the lungs, the results are disastrous: It forms a hydrogel, which can fill the lungs in some patients. According to Jacobson, once this happens, “it’s like trying to breathe through Jell-O.”
              “Demolish the bridges behind you… then there is no choice but to build again.”

              Live Radio from 100.3

              Comment


              • We're lucky to have WW as our team doctor.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by WisconsinWildcard View Post

                  A good question. I can speak a bit on it but I would caveat that there are a lot of details that are nuanced that may not translate well.

                  Different states do have different requirements that trigger an autopsy. Age, reason noted for death, circumstances surrounding death, level of involvement of medical professionals etc. Ultimately that is the best way to determine the exact cause of death in most cases if in the hands of an experienced and well trained pathologist. It is helpful for record keeping but it is also important learning opportunity. NEJM has a weekly section from Mass General that has countless lessons learned from autopsy.

                  Coronary artery disease is very common and we have good ideas of historical rates. Most people with CAD do not have heart attacks. If we start seeing changes in the pattern of patients (which is not too challenging, especially in the setting of a tertiary care facility where one team is caring for all heart attacks or strokes), it is a reasonable assumption the ongoing pandemic is changing that. We have actually seen this, with mild heart attacks and strokes essentially staying home, and an increase in more severe or atypical heart attacks/strokes (like in the young, no other clear co-morbidities).

                  Covid-19 is pro-thrombotic, we have learned. It has a high rate of pulmonary embolism, ischemic stroke, heart attack, DVT etc in hospitalized patients and a thrombotic event as the presenting symptom is not that uncommon.

                  Ultimately, it comes down to where you die and the physician who cared for you to determine most etiologies of death. If you have a patient with clear signs of Covid-19 infection and a thrombotic event, you are more likely to identify that as an etiology. If it is a positive test but you do not feel it was a large contributor, you may not identify it. The vast majority of physicians, especially the ICU docs that are doing most of this, are great, compassionate professionals. The degree of rampant fraud or incompetence required to drastically change the numbers is near impossible and would require a vast conspiracy of hundreds of thousand individuals.
                  Interesting. I always assumed it was up to the individual doctors to decide what to list as the cause of death, so it seemed unlikely that they would have all gotten together to list Covid as the reason if it really wasn't the reason. But I was also curious how much flexibility they have to decide whether it's a Covid death or something else.

                  I think here in Minnesota we're going to hear a lot more on this topic on a somewhat related note when the George Floyd trials start. News reports have given hints that "cause of death" is likely going to be the topic of some debate in that trial, if the defense has their way.
                  That community is already in the process of dissolution where each man begins to eye his neighbor as a possible enemy, where non-conformity with the accepted creed, political as well as religious, is a mark of disaffection; where denunciation, without specification or backing, takes the place of evidence; where orthodoxy chokes freedom of dissent; where faith in the eventual supremacy of reason has become so timid that we dare not enter our convictions in the open lists, to win or lose.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by burd View Post
                    We're lucky to have WW as our team doctor.
                    Yes, he is awesome, like having uno as in-house counsel. :-)

                    Thank you both for getting those degrees so I didn't have to.
                    Cornell University
                    National Champion 1967, 1970
                    ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
                    Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

                      Interesting. I always assumed it was up to the individual doctors to decide what to list as the cause of death, so it seemed unlikely that they would have all gotten together to list Covid as the reason if it really wasn't the reason. But I was also curious how much flexibility they have to decide whether it's a Covid death or something else.

                      I think here in Minnesota we're going to hear a lot more on this topic on a somewhat related note when the George Floyd trials start. News reports have given hints that "cause of death" is likely going to be the topic of some debate in that trial, if the defense has their way.
                      I'm not a doctor (but I work with them as a systems analyst - and yes play one on tv), but I think you may be somewhat misreading what he said. In most cases there is no autopsy, and the attending/PCP/whomever determines cause of death.
                      I gotta little bit of smoke and a whole lotta wine...

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Swansong View Post

                        I'm not a doctor (but I work with them as a systems analyst - and yes play one on tv), but I think you may be somewhat misreading what he said. In most cases there is no autopsy, and the attending/PCP/whomever determines cause of death.
                        No, I understood that it was the attending physician (probably) who in most cases is determining cause of death. I was really more curious about how much flexibility they had in factoring in Covid, and what went into making the decision, which WW seemed to answer quite well.
                        That community is already in the process of dissolution where each man begins to eye his neighbor as a possible enemy, where non-conformity with the accepted creed, political as well as religious, is a mark of disaffection; where denunciation, without specification or backing, takes the place of evidence; where orthodoxy chokes freedom of dissent; where faith in the eventual supremacy of reason has become so timid that we dare not enter our convictions in the open lists, to win or lose.

                        Comment


                        • How often is anyone catching something from Kirk cousins?

                          https://bringmethenews.com/minnesota...covid-19-masks

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
                            How often is anyone catching something from Kirk cousins?

                            https://bringmethenews.com/minnesota...covid-19-masks
                            Well, if he's masking up and acknowledging the respect for others idea then I guess that's fine. But jesus, what a moron.
                            I gotta little bit of smoke and a whole lotta wine...

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Swansong View Post

                              Well, if he's masking up and acknowledging the respect for others idea then I guess that's fine. But jesus, what a moron.
                              Athletes are windows into the cognitive limits of everyday people. They're of average intellect, whereas many people in the public eye at least have some basic level of intelligence to achieve their notoriety. Most politicians at least went to school (athletes do too, but most never crack a book), even though it may have been some barely sentient Christian school. Most business people at least had some sort of native predatory wiliness to separate them from the pack.

                              The public people who are selected on a pure meritocratic standard for skills that have zero with do with intelligence are athletes, models, and actors, so that's why they seem so rock stupid. They are average.
                              Last edited by Kepler; 09-02-2020, 11:01 AM.
                              Cornell University
                              National Champion 1967, 1970
                              ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
                              Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Kepler View Post

                                Athletes are windows into the cognitive limits of everyday people. They're of average intellect, whereas many people in the public eye at least have some basic level of intelligence to achieve their notoriety. Most politicians at least went to school (athletes do too, but most never crack a book),
                                Careful. I've heard that insulting athletes or making jokes about their educational efforts is not allowed.
                                That community is already in the process of dissolution where each man begins to eye his neighbor as a possible enemy, where non-conformity with the accepted creed, political as well as religious, is a mark of disaffection; where denunciation, without specification or backing, takes the place of evidence; where orthodoxy chokes freedom of dissent; where faith in the eventual supremacy of reason has become so timid that we dare not enter our convictions in the open lists, to win or lose.

                                Comment

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