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  • Re: Another Book Thread

    Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post
    Crichton's career was ruined for me after he wrote State of Fear, but up until Jurassic Park he was good.
    Last Crichton book I read was probably in 1995. Sphere was my favorite, if I recall correctly. I barely remember them now.

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    • Re: Another Book Thread

      Originally posted by jen View Post
      Saw this somewhere else and thought it was a fun question.... what books spawned your love of reading?

      I remember reading the Serendipity series by Stephen Cosgrove in elementary school and checking them all out from the library. I had the Little House on the Prairie boxed set, also loved Nancy Drew, Beverly Cleary, Little Golden Books (esp. Poky Little Puppy), and a little later, Judy Blume.

      As I got older, in middle school and high school, I read Sweet Valley Twins and then Sweet Valley High. Also a fantasy series called Dragonlance and everything by Michael Crichton. Probably the last time I read a fantasy book. Not sure why.
      What a fun question and what a trip down memory lane. I started to think of this and my head asploded. I read early and pretty much anything I could get my hands on. When we were in England my folks would go to the auction and pick up lots of the old Classics which I read cover to cover.

      First book I remember- the story of Moses (it had beautiful watercolor illustrations)
      Early elementary school- Aesop's Fables, lots of classic fairy tales, Happy Hollisters, The Bobbsey Twins, Black Beauty, Blaze (there were a few horsey books in the series) and some series that had a bunch of animals- Maybe Wind in the Willows altho I am pretty sure it was something different. The Borrowers series, Mrs Pigglewiggle. 'Striped Ice Cream' by Joan Lexau
      Late Elementary- The Odyssey, The Illiad (read them Unabridged and loved them- later- blech!!), Classics by Dickens, Alcott, Twain, Robinson Crusoe, The little Princess, The Secret Garden. Harriet the Spy. Dahl, Nora Lofts series set in historical England. "Heartsease" by Peter Dickinson
      Early teen- Judy Blume, James Bond, what ever science fiction was in the house, Bradbury, Poe, Hawthorne, Orwell. What ever we read for school I usually read them so fast I would end up reading what else they wrote. Loved the Transcendentalism, American Gothic period
      College- Gone with the Wind and Shogun every Finals week. Tolkien. Connie Willis- Domesday and junk romance.
      Grad school- Roberta Gellis Roselynde series, Brother Cadefael series, Gone with the Wind and Shogun every Finals week, Clan of the Cave Bear series
      After- Outlander series- before it was popular then morphed into JD Robb, James Rollins, Cussler, Phillipa Gregory, historical novels set in Elizabethan or Medieval times and trash romance series- Jo Beverly, Julia Quinn, Amanda Quick/ Krentz.

      Thank God for Libraries!! I have a wall of books that I read again- Many of them from when I was a kid. I have friends that are excited to read a book a month. I can read 2-3 new ones a week if I can find ones that I like. Have an old favorite I read right before I go to bed and what ever I am listening to when I walk every day.

      Currently just finished listening to the first Poldark and now listening to Demelza Poldark (second in series). Set in Cornwall in the 1800s during the mining unrest and restructuring. Rambling but interesting. Have been to many of the places they mention and lived thru coal crisis in the 70s when the miners struck and the BBC talked about the history of mining a lot.
      Last edited by leswp1; 01-13-2020, 09:02 PM.

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      • Re: Another Book Thread

        Originally posted by jen View Post
        Last Crichton book I read was probably in 1995. Sphere was my favorite, if I recall correctly. I barely remember them now.
        The one I liked the most was Timeline.

        Comment


        • Re: Another Book Thread

          Originally posted by jen View Post
          Saw this somewhere else and thought it was a fun question.... what books spawned your love of reading?

          I remember reading the Serendipity series by Stephen Cosgrove in elementary school and checking them all out from the library. I had the Little House on the Prairie boxed set, also loved Nancy Drew, Beverly Cleary, Little Golden Books (esp. Poky Little Puppy), and a little later, Judy Blume.

          As I got older, in middle school and high school, I read Sweet Valley Twins and then Sweet Valley High. Also a fantasy series called Dragonlance and everything by Michael Crichton. Probably the last time I read a fantasy book. Not sure why.
          Had to do book reports in school, and Stephen King was the author for me. Being in an old-school Roman Catholic upbringing...that was a tough sell. One teacher understood it: "He is a modern Edgar Allen Poe."
          Never really developed a taste for tequila. Kind of hard to understand how you make a drink out of something that sharp, inhospitable. Now, bourbon is easy to understand.
          Tastes like a warm summer day. -Raylan Givens

          Comment


          • Originally posted by jen View Post
            Saw this somewhere else and thought it was a fun question.... what books spawned your love of reading?

            I remember reading the Serendipity series by Stephen Cosgrove in elementary school and checking them all out from the library. I had the Little House on the Prairie boxed set, also loved Nancy Drew, Beverly Cleary, Little Golden Books (esp. Poky Little Puppy), and a little later, Judy Blume.

            As I got older, in middle school and high school, I read Sweet Valley Twins and then Sweet Valley High. Also a fantasy series called Dragonlance and everything by Michael Crichton. Probably the last time I read a fantasy book. Not sure why.
            Tom Wolfe.
            Originally posted by BobbyBrady
            Crosby probably wouldn't even be on BC's top two lines next year

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            • Re: Another Book Thread

              The New York Public Library's most checked-out book of all time is a story about a little boy enjoying a snowfall

              … Since it was founded more than a century go, the New York Public Library has seen millions of books checked in and out. But the book that's been checked out the most is a simple story about a child enjoying his city's first snowfall.

              The library, the second largest in the US after the Library of Congress, has released its list of the Top 10 checkouts of all time. Topping it is "The Snowy Day" by Ezra Jack Keats. That picture book has been borrowed a whopping 485,584 times since it was published in 1962...

              Medlar said there's a reason why so many children's books appear on the list.

              "The shorter the book, the more turnover, or circulation," Medlar said in a statement. "The adult books on the list tend to be shorter, such as 1984 and To Kill a Mockingbird."

              Other criteria that seem to influence whether a book is a top checkout are how many languages it's available in, length of time in print, and universal appeal.

              Here are the 10 most checked-out books:
              1. "The Snowy Day," by Ezra Jack Keats (485,583 checkouts)
              2. "The Cat in the Hat," by Dr. Seuss (469,650)
              3. "1984," by George Orwell (441,770)
              4. "Where the Wild Things Are," by Maurice Sendak (436,016)
              5. "To Kill a Mockingbird," by Harper Lee (422,912)
              6. "Charlotte's Web," by E.B. White (337,948)
              7. "Fahrenheit 451," by Ray Bradbury (316,404)
              8. "How to Win Friends and Influence People," by Dale Carnegie (284,524)
              9. "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone," by J.K. Rowling (231,022)
              10. "The Very Hungry Caterpillar," by Eric Carle (189,550)
              Honorable Mention: "Goodnight Moon," by Margaret Wise Brown
              "The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." George Orwell, 1984

              "One does not simply walk into Mordor. Its Black Gates are guarded by more than just Orcs. There is evil there that does not sleep, and the Great Eye is ever watchful. It is a barren wasteland, riddled with fire and ash and dust, the very air you breathe is a poisonous fume." Boromir

              "Good news! We have a delivery." Professor Farnsworth

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              • Re: Another Book Thread

                Originally posted by jen View Post
                what books spawned your love of reading?
                Ivanhoe. Foundation. Ringworld. Dune. Borges' short stories.
                Cornell University
                National Champion 1967, 1970
                ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
                Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

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                • Re: Another Book Thread

                  Originally posted by jen View Post
                  Last Crichton book I read was probably in 1995. Sphere was my favorite, if I recall correctly. I barely remember them now.
                  The Andromeda Strain still holds up. The rest not so much. He was always a screenplay writer mistaking himself for a novelist (see also: William Goldman).
                  Cornell University
                  National Champion 1967, 1970
                  ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
                  Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

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                  • Re: Another Book Thread

                    The film version of Congo was awesomely bad thanks entirely to Tim Curry. There is not one B-movie that guy can't improve.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post
                      The film version of Congo was awesomely bad thanks entirely to Tim Curry. There is not one B-movie that guy can't improve.
                      Stop eating my sesame cake!

                      U-A-A!!!Go!Go!GreenandGold!
                      Applejack Tells You How UAA Is Doing...
                      I spell Failure with UAF

                      Originally posted by UAFIceAngel
                      But let's be real...There are 40 some other teams and only two alaskan teams...the day one of us wins something big will be the day I transfer to UAA
                      Originally posted by Doyle Woody
                      Best sign by a visting Seawolf fan Friday went to a young man who held up a piece of white poster board that read: "YOU CAN'T SPELL FAILURE WITHOUT UAF."

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                      • Re: Another Book Thread

                        The Inner Game of Tennis by Timothy Gallwey.

                        I've been playing pinball competitively for a little while now and have been looking for ways to improve, and had this book recommended to me on several occasions. Useful for any situation where kind of a "detached confidence" sans mental jitters is required, and pinball is exactly that.
                        Michigan Tech Huskies Pep Band: There's No Use Trying To Talk. No Human Sound Can Stand Up To This. Loud Enough To Knock You Down.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Twitch Boy View Post
                          The Inner Game of Tennis by Timothy Gallwey.

                          I've been playing pinball competitively for a little while now and have been looking for ways to improve, and had this book recommended to me on several occasions. Useful for any situation where kind of a "detached confidence" sans mental jitters is required, and pinball is exactly that.
                          My dad read both the tennis and skiing versions of that book.

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                          • Re: Another Book Thread

                            Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post
                            The film version of Congo was awesomely bad thanks entirely to Tim Curry. There is not one B-movie that guy can't improve.
                            I'm escaping to the one place that hasn't been corrupted by capitalism...

                            *five full seconds of corpsing as even he realizes there's no saving this line*

                            ...SHPACE!

                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yMy7JuGpJM
                            Michigan Tech Huskies Pep Band: There's No Use Trying To Talk. No Human Sound Can Stand Up To This. Loud Enough To Knock You Down.

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                            • Re: Another Book Thread

                              Nickel Boys - Colson Whitehead: a rare 5-star review on Goodreads from me. He has a way of really explaining his characters so you feel like you know them. Heartbreaking and couldn't put it down.

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                              • Re: Another Book Thread

                                I'm writing something myself, trying to get the first draft done soon. I think if I get 200 pages in MS Word on 12 pt Times New Roman, that will be long enough. It's mostly my memoir, along with letters to myself (advice I give myself). I'd love to share what I have so far...
                                Facebook: bcowles920 Instagram: missthundercat01
                                "One word frees us from the weight and pain of this life. That word is love."- Socrates
                                Patreon for exclusive writing content
                                Adventures With Amber Marie

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