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The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

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  • unofan
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post

    Whew. The good news is, after a 3 hour $850 inspection today…it’s all minor crap. A huge relief
    Here's my lesson learned from selling our first house a while back: whatever the buyer's inspector comes back with, don't try to fix it. Just be willing to drop the price some and leave it to the buyer to fix up (or not). The hassle of trying to get a contractor out prior to closing and getting the buyer to agree it was done correctly isn't worth it.

    Leave a comment:


  • walrus
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post

    Whew. The good news is, after a 3 hour $850 inspection today…it’s all minor crap. A huge relief
    3 hrs, 850 bucks, I’m in the wrong business. What licenses does this guy have?

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by SJHovey View Post

    Some (unsolicited) comments on this.

    First, when you sell your house in Minnesota, you are required to give the buyers a disclosure statement that discloses relevant facts about the roof, foundation, and other parts of your home, and any issues or problems with those areas. This disclosure is basically to the knowledge of the seller, so in terms of the disclosure, and any omissions or misrepresentations in that disclosure that the buyers might later complain about, the existence of this inspection report will place certain knowledge in your head, just in case you don't either fix all the items identified, or fail to disclose what you learn from the report to the buyer. You can't claim that you had no knowledge of issues with the roof when you got an inspection two weeks earlier telling you about those problems.

    In fact, I might go so far as to give them a copy of your report with your disclosure. But if you don't fix everything the report identifies, you will be giving the buyers ammunition with which to negotiate.

    In terms of the disclosure, it is true that "ignorance is bliss."

    The parties can also agree to waive the requirement of a disclosure, and as the seller I always ask to do that.

    It is also true that many people conduct an inspection, then use things found in the inspection to re-negotiate on price. However, not everyone gets an inspection, and not all inspections are equal. I've seen a lot of them where the inspector does a terrible job, and doesn't do a lot more than flip the light switches on and off. Thus, you run the risk that your inspector will find things that their inspector wouldn't have, and thus you will have paid to fix items the buyer wouldn't even complain about.

    Finally, and this depends a lot on whether it's a buyers or sellers market, but if it's a sellers market (which I still think it is, somewhat), buyers are much less likely to complain about or try to negotiate on repair issues, for fear that another buyer will have their offer accepted.

    Just my two cents.
    Whew. The good news is, after a 3 hour $850 inspection today…it’s all minor crap. A huge relief

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Honestly, you can still buy nearly that exact same faucet. It costs $125 and the nicer ones cost $140. I'll give up an extra Tubman for something that isn't a relic just yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by RaceBoarder View Post
    Just think: That's the new version of "Grampa and Grandma's House" to a whole new generation!
    "Dated" is how you get insecure people to rip out perfectly functional solutions every 20 years.

    cf. fashion

    Leave a comment:


  • RaceBoarder
    replied
    Just think: That's the new version of "Grampa and Grandma's House" to a whole new generation!

    Leave a comment:


  • FadeToBlack&Gold
    replied
    Yeah, it was either the pear-shape or the faceted round, but always the plastic/acrylic material and same placement.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post

    Pretty damn close.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    I am aware of all that. I’m pretty sure there are a few things the previous owners knowingly hid which makes me mad. I’ve fixed all the bigger things that the inspection turned up when I bought- installed a new roof, backup sump, chimney small issues, electrical things here and there.

    I’m a very nervous person who worries a ton so my realtor basically suggested this for my own good. If this was two years ago it’d be different- but no one knows yet how spring will be and I’m certain someone will be running an inspection

    Leave a comment:


  • SJHovey
    replied
    Originally posted by Deutsche Gopher Fan View Post
    I’m likely insane but im paying for a prelist home inspection later this week.

    my house is 70 years old. 90% chance any buyer will run an inspection these days- so I’m getting ahead of it. I’m willing to spend 20k or so making house ready but I want to prioritize. I really don’t want a big surprise come offer time, so I’m doing this.
    Some (unsolicited) comments on this.

    First, when you sell your house in Minnesota, you are required to give the buyers a disclosure statement that discloses relevant facts about the roof, foundation, and other parts of your home, and any issues or problems with those areas. This disclosure is basically to the knowledge of the seller, so in terms of the disclosure, and any omissions or misrepresentations in that disclosure that the buyers might later complain about, the existence of this inspection report will place certain knowledge in your head, just in case you don't either fix all the items identified, or fail to disclose what you learn from the report to the buyer. You can't claim that you had no knowledge of issues with the roof when you got an inspection two weeks earlier telling you about those problems.

    In fact, I might go so far as to give them a copy of your report with your disclosure. But if you don't fix everything the report identifies, you will be giving the buyers ammunition with which to negotiate.

    In terms of the disclosure, it is true that "ignorance is bliss."

    The parties can also agree to waive the requirement of a disclosure, and as the seller I always ask to do that.

    It is also true that many people conduct an inspection, then use things found in the inspection to re-negotiate on price. However, not everyone gets an inspection, and not all inspections are equal. I've seen a lot of them where the inspector does a terrible job, and doesn't do a lot more than flip the light switches on and off. Thus, you run the risk that your inspector will find things that their inspector wouldn't have, and thus you will have paid to fix items the buyer wouldn't even complain about.

    Finally, and this depends a lot on whether it's a buyers or sellers market, but if it's a sellers market (which I still think it is, somewhat), buyers are much less likely to complain about or try to negotiate on repair issues, for fear that another buyer will have their offer accepted.

    Just my two cents.

    Leave a comment:


  • French Rage
    replied
    Originally posted by FadeToBlack&Gold View Post

    Why were you taking pictures of my parent's upstairs bathroom? (Same tiles too!)

    Leave a comment:


  • FadeToBlack&Gold
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
    Bonus points if you can guess the exact faucets we had in our bathroom.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deutsche Gopher Fan
    replied
    I’m likely insane but im paying for a prelist home inspection later this week.

    my house is 70 years old. 90% chance any buyer will run an inspection these days- so I’m getting ahead of it. I’m willing to spend 20k or so making house ready but I want to prioritize. I really don’t want a big surprise come offer time, so I’m doing this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post

    People are expensive. I can do things like swap out outlets, replace faucets, etc. they aren't that difficult. Especially nowadays with the fittings they use on most faucets.

    Flood or burn down the house type of stuff gets dispatched to a pro
    Meh, it keeps the trades alive, plus DIY gets expensive when the dominoes start falling like in your example.

    Leave a comment:


  • dxmnkd316
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post

    Stop doing stuff like this yourself. Write a check to a bonded professional; make it his problem.
    People are expensive. I can do things like swap out outlets, replace faucets, etc. they aren't that difficult. Especially nowadays with the fittings they use on most faucets.

    Flood or burn down the house type of stuff gets dispatched to a pro

    Leave a comment:

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