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The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

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  • #46
    Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

    Originally posted by joecct View Post
    The outlet is in a bathroom. GFI circuit required.
    Nearest we can tell from testing lights/outlets is from breaker 9
    Goes to deck receptacle
    Then to master bath. All the other plugs in all the other bathrooms are hot.
    All the other outside plugs are hot.

    There are at least 3 other GFI outlets in the house, but none connected to breaker 9.

    It used to be quite common to wire a string of outlets on two circuits by making all the tops one, and all the bottoms another. The bars on the side of the outlet that connect the top and bottom would be broken off allowing for this type of setup, making each outlet a "split receptacle." Now, you usually would see a line of outlets on two circuits alternating, so every other one is in it's entirety, on a different circuit. The most obvious thing in your case would be that someone figured they needed a GFI in the bathroom, pulled the old split one and just stuck the GFI in because after all, the wires and colors in there matched the picture on the GFI box. (This surprisingly, might even sort of work sometimes if lucky, but I doubt the GFI would work right.) Next most likely is that another "split" outlet was replaced without breaking the side bar to separate the top and bottom, connecting the two circuits instead. Again, that this worked, if it ever did, is just mostly by luck. If I understand the whole thing correctly, I would cap the feed from 7 and put it back together from 9, which would make that outlet (only) a GFI. I assume it's at the end of the line because right now you're obviously not feeding any other outlets from that one GFI as you have two power ins and no power out, and apparently no other non working fixtures.

    But again I don't advise you to just do that based on my assessment without seeing the whole situation. I'm not confident in telling someone to do what I just said unless they really understand what's going on. I don't know for example if you have the need to feed other outlets in that bathroom from this one. If you do, that's not the answer. It was interesting to think about the problem though, so I'm glad you posted. Love to hear how it all shakes out in the end.
    Last edited by Wisko McBadgerton; 06-26-2017, 02:57 PM.
    Originally posted by WiscTJK
    I'm with Wisko and Tim.
    Originally posted by Timothy A
    Other than Wisko McBadgerton and Badger Bob, who is universally loved by all?

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Wisko McBadgerton View Post
      It used to be quite common to wire a string of outlets on two circuits by making all the tops one, and all the bottoms another. The bars on the side of the outlet that connect the top and bottom would be broken off allowing for this type of setup, making each outlet a "split receptacle." Now, you usually would see a line of outlets on two circuits alternating, so every other one is in it's entirety, on a different circuit. The most obvious thing in your case would be that someone figured they needed a GFI in the bathroom, pulled the old split one and just stuck the GFI in because after all, the wires and colors in there matched the picture on the GFI box. (This surprisingly, might even sort of work sometimes if lucky, but I doubt the GFI would work right.) Next most likely is that another "split" outlet was replaced without breaking the side bar to separate the top and bottom, connecting the two circuits instead. Again, that this worked, if it ever did, is just mostly by luck. If I understand the whole thing correctly, I would cap the feed from 7 and put it back together from 9, which would make that outlet (only) a GFI. I assume it's at the end of the line because right now you're obviously not feeding any other outlets from that one GFI as you have two power ins and no power out, and apparently no other non working fixtures.

      But again I don't advise you to just do that based on my assessment without seeing the whole situation. I'm not confident in telling someone to do what I just said unless they really understand what's going on. I don't know for example if you have the need to feed other outlets in that bathroom from this one. If you do, that's not the answer. It was interesting to think about the problem though, so I'm glad you posted. Love to hear how it all shakes out in the end.
      I had the same idea. However, something does not appear to be kosher, so he's getting the pros to take a look.

      A man's got to know his own limitations.
      CCT '77 & '78
      4 kids
      5 grandsons (BCA 7/09, CJA 5/14, JDL 8/14, JFL 6/16, PJL 7/18)
      1 granddaughter (EML 4/18)

      ”Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.”
      - Benjamin Franklin

      Banned from the St. Lawrence University Facebook page - March 2016 (But I got better).

      I want to live forever. So far, so good.

      Comment


      • #48
        Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

        Originally posted by joecct View Post
        A man's got to know his own limitations.
        That's what she said.
        Cornell University
        National Champion 1967, 1970
        ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
        Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

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        • #49
          Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

          Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
          I have horrible soil. It's hard clay. I've seen a garden rake bounce off the soil in my front yard after three days without water. I need to get it aerated this fall and again in the spring.
          The problem with concrete on clay is drainage. If the clay is retaining a lot of moisture you can get a good deal of heaving with frost and a quickly broken slab. If it's real clay you often need to dig out, fill with sand/ gravel, compact, and then pour. If you have decent drainage to start with, then pavers are pretty easy to do, and they tend to settle more or less back in place even if they do heave, or it's easy to reset a few if they don't entirely. I'd do this as it's not as hard as it seems like it will be. It goes pretty fast.

          If it's wet and it's clay, you might consider something like pea gravel. Building it up a little above grade and maybe ringing it with stone blocks or something that allows water out when it rains. It would be relatively inexpensive and give you nice solid and dry base that can heave all it wants. Just add a little over the top every year or two. I've seen some this way that are pretty nice.
          Originally posted by WiscTJK
          I'm with Wisko and Tim.
          Originally posted by Timothy A
          Other than Wisko McBadgerton and Badger Bob, who is universally loved by all?

          Comment


          • #50
            Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

            Originally posted by Kepler View Post
            That's what she said.
            Leave Dr. Mrs. out of this.

            And save time by abbreviating: TWSS!
            The preceding post may contain trigger words and is not safe-space approved. <-- Virtue signaling.

            North Dakota Hockey:

            Comment


            • #51
              Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

              Originally posted by The Sicatoka View Post
              Leave Dr. Mrs. out of this.

              And save time by abbreviating: TWSS!
              I would but correctly it's twss, and when you go all lowercase stupid Cafe coverts the entire post including quotes into lowercase for some reason.
              Cornell University
              National Champion 1967, 1970
              ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
              Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

              Comment


              • #52
                Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                Originally posted by Kepler View Post
                That's what she said.
                My PP is over 80%!!!
                CCT '77 & '78
                4 kids
                5 grandsons (BCA 7/09, CJA 5/14, JDL 8/14, JFL 6/16, PJL 7/18)
                1 granddaughter (EML 4/18)

                ”Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.”
                - Benjamin Franklin

                Banned from the St. Lawrence University Facebook page - March 2016 (But I got better).

                I want to live forever. So far, so good.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                  I'm breaking basement my floor. A crack developed in the concrete of my basement - the utility/storage room, and water started seeping up when the soil got really wet. I've started cutting out the crack, which totals about 14ft in length. That might have been a mistake, and I should've just chiseled it instead. Pieces are getting stuck in the crack, I think it's due to a, more or less, ribbon of concrete that feels a bit like really strong, inflexible paper.

                  At any rate, assuming I can clean the crack enough to fill it in correctly, I bought some sand to fill in the deepest portion of the crack, and some Quikrete concrete crack repair/filler.

                  Add to that, it turns out the water that seeped into the room had some salt content of one type or another. So the concrete started flaking a little towards the edges of where the water pooled. I've been scrubbing it with a wire brush to clean what I can. Once this whole thing is done, I'm going to get some concrete floor paint, perhaps that'll help protect it a little in the future. That'll probably be next year, to give everything time to set and see if my crack fill worked.
                  "The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." George Orwell, 1984

                  "One does not simply walk into Mordor. Its Black Gates are guarded by more than just Orcs. There is evil there that does not sleep, and the Great Eye is ever watchful. It is a barren wasteland, riddled with fire and ash and dust, the very air you breathe is a poisonous fume." Boromir

                  "Good news! We have a delivery." Professor Farnsworth

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                    Originally posted by St. Clown View Post
                    I'm breaking basement my floor. A crack developed in the concrete of my basement - the utility/storage room, and water started seeping up when the soil got really wet. I've started cutting out the crack, which totals about 14ft in length. That might have been a mistake, and I should've just chiseled it instead. Pieces are getting stuck in the crack, I think it's due to a, more or less, ribbon of concrete that feels a bit like really strong, inflexible paper.
                    .
                    Just can't imagine what you have just described, but it would be interesting to see. What are you cutting it with, a concrete saw? Are you thinking you could have chiseled out 14' of concrete with a cold chisel? Can we come over and drink beer and watch?

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                      Originally posted by burd View Post
                      Just can't imagine what you have just described, but it would be interesting to see. What are you cutting it with, a concrete saw? Are you thinking you could have chiseled out 14' of concrete with a cold chisel? Can we come over and drink beer and watch?
                      I only need to widen the crack so the sealant/filler can be applied consistently. The chisel is about two inches wide, and only takes a single strike of the hammer to make the cut. It actually goes pretty quickly. It's just nowhere near being fun.

                      Yes, I started with an electric saw, handheld 4.5" masonry blade. The cutting went fast with it, but it left that ribbon. And the ribbon is catching the debris that I can't clear out of the crack. It has me doubting how effective/leak proff the filler will be.
                      "The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." George Orwell, 1984

                      "One does not simply walk into Mordor. Its Black Gates are guarded by more than just Orcs. There is evil there that does not sleep, and the Great Eye is ever watchful. It is a barren wasteland, riddled with fire and ash and dust, the very air you breathe is a poisonous fume." Boromir

                      "Good news! We have a delivery." Professor Farnsworth

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                        Originally posted by St. Clown View Post
                        I only need to widen the crack so the sealant/filler can be applied consistently. The chisel is about two inches wide, and only takes a single strike of the hammer to make the cut. It actually goes pretty quickly. It's just nowhere near being fun.

                        Yes, I started with an electric saw, handheld 4.5" masonry blade. The cutting went fast with it, but it left that ribbon. And the ribbon is catching the debris that I can't clear out of the crack. It has me doubting how effective/leak proff the filler will be.
                        If the water has any pressure behind it, I doubt Quikrete will work. As long is it's just a utility room, though, no harm in trying.

                        Before you commit to filling it with something, though, call a waterproofing expert for a recommendation--like an injectable epoxy.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                          Originally posted by burd View Post
                          If the water has any pressure behind it, I doubt Quikrete will work. As long is it's just a utility room, though, no harm in trying.

                          Before you commit to filling it with something, though, call a waterproofing expert for a recommendation--like an injectable epoxy.
                          I don't think there was water pressure to create the crack. The crack formed on the surface since shortly after I bought the house, because, as we all know, concrete cracks as it cures. I don't know how deep that crack has been or for how long. Regardless, for 11 or 12 years I saw no water. Then last winter I had water seep into the house. I think the water just followed the access.
                          "The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." George Orwell, 1984

                          "One does not simply walk into Mordor. Its Black Gates are guarded by more than just Orcs. There is evil there that does not sleep, and the Great Eye is ever watchful. It is a barren wasteland, riddled with fire and ash and dust, the very air you breathe is a poisonous fume." Boromir

                          "Good news! We have a delivery." Professor Farnsworth

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                            Tough to fix cracked concrete. I think I would use water plug, it expands as it sets. Make sure everything is clean.

                            Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
                            I swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell.

                            Maine Hockey Love it or Leave it

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                            • #59
                              Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                              Originally posted by ShirtlessBob View Post
                              Menards and Home Depot are being sued because a 4 by 4 doesn't exactly measure 4 inches by 4 inches.

                              http://www.wzzm13.com/news/nation-wo...tion/451196391
                              At the Home Depot we bought all our house crap at there were signs that clearly indicated this. (It was, by the way, news* to me.) I would think the presence of signage nullifies the argument.

                              IINM when it says "4x4" there are no units specified, anyway, so for all one knows 4 Rigelian skulpulshanks equals 3.5 Earth inches, and the name is correct.

                              * Here is the reason, for everyone not born on a workbench.

                              Lumber manufacturers typically cut a tree into dimensional lumber very shortly after the tree is felled. Then, the newly-sawn (but soaking wet) lumber is kiln-dried until it reaches the desired moisture level. As lumber dries, it shrinks (as the moisture in the wood is reduced, the wood cells shrink, particularly across the grain). While the 8' length won't change much as the wood dries, the 2" width and 4" height (cross-section of the grain) will shrink considerably.

                              Because of this shrinkage, a typical 2x4 will usually measure out to around 1-1/2" x 3-1/2".
                              Cornell University
                              National Champion 1967, 1970
                              ECAC Champion 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2010
                              Ivy League Champion 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2019, 2020

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Re: The Home Improvement Thread. Successes and Failures

                                Originally posted by Kepler View Post
                                At the Home Depot we bought all our house crap at there were signs that clearly indicated this. (It was, by the way, news* to me.) I would think the presence of signage nullifies the argument.

                                IINM when it says "4x4" there are no units specified, anyway, so for all one knows 4 Rigelian skulpulshanks equals 3.5 Earth inches, and the name is correct.

                                * Here is the reason, for everyone not born on a workbench.
                                If plaintiffs' counsel can pull this one off, they're good. I wouldn't advise them to carry their clients' costs.

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