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Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

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  • burd
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
    Years ago, Jesse Jackson (Sr.) admitted in an interview that when he was walking down the street and saw a group of black teenagers ahead of him, he'd cross to the other side rather than walk past them. Of course, that was Chicago....
    In MLK's last years, he was the target of a lot of anger from blacks who were fed up with his policy of nonviolence, which they thought was completely ineffective. I realize that is completely different from the examples that are being given here, but Jesse J may have been subject to some of that anger as well.

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  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    You [some people] can try to keep the cops as guard dogs for the rich -- that's your [their] bag and hey you [they] seem to be winning. But many on my side will actually try to improve things and bring a little sanity to the process. And likely help the cops, too, who under your [their] regime are just an occupying army.

    Will you ever get the distinction that merely making an observation about how things are is not at all a statement in support of how things are?

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by St. Clown View Post
    I hate to make the comparison, but it's the stories of the black cabbies admitting to skipping black people on the streets because they fear for their safety or losing out on a fare. It's tough to say if that happens only after having been burned a few times on the fares, or if it's ingrained in them because of society. Regardless, stuff like this happens.
    Years ago, Jesse Jackson (Sr.) admitted in an interview that when he was walking down the street and saw a group of black teenagers ahead of him, he'd cross to the other side rather than walk past them. Of course, that was Chicago....

    Leave a comment:


  • jerphisch
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by geezer View Post
    Is this seriously real? I can't think of a worse policy than expecting a cop under fire to take careful aim at a moving ankle bone before defending himself. It just seems bizarre. Can you imagine how many more dead cops we'd have in the U.S. if we tried this?
    Is this another of those "but Finland has a homogeneous population so it works" things? I don't see how.
    okay, what I learned in my five minutes of research about socialist countries that don't have all those pesky "constitutional rights" is that most of the cops just carry tasers since the people aren't allowed to have guns. So I guess that explains that: "You'll feel safer here in this little padded box and we'll feed you twice a day..."
    To your first question, ummmm 10?

    To your last point, you need to do 5 minutes of research on prison there too, many prisoners only spend the nights in their "box" and do things like go to work during the day. You know, they are treated like people instead of animals.

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  • St. Clown
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    The f-ck does that matter? You really don't get that systemic racism affects everybody? Did you really never even hear of black citizens' fear of black cops because they can be even more gung-ho just to show they're on the ahem "right" side?

    But, no. I'm sure you're right and this is all everybody's imagination. Must be hard to be so misunderstood.
    I hate to make the comparison, but it's the stories of the black cabbies admitting to skipping black people on the streets because they fear for their safety or losing out on a fare. It's tough to say if that happens only after having been burned a few times on the fares, or if it's ingrained in them because of society. Regardless, stuff like this happens.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by SteveP View Post
    Oh, and in case you missed it at 2:11 into the video, the officer's partner is black!
    The f-ck does that matter? You really don't get that systemic racism affects everybody? Did you really never even hear of black citizens' fear of black cops because they can be even more gung-ho just to show they're on the ahem "right" side?

    But, no. I'm sure you're right and this is all everybody's imagination. Must be hard to be so misunderstood.

    Leave a comment:


  • geezer
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by trixR4kids View Post
    in Finland they shoot to maim and stop the suspect.
    Is this seriously real? I can't think of a worse policy than expecting a cop under fire to take careful aim at a moving ankle bone before defending himself. It just seems bizarre. Can you imagine how many more dead cops we'd have in the U.S. if we tried this?
    Is this another of those "but Finland has a homogeneous population so it works" things? I don't see how.
    okay, what I learned in my five minutes of research about socialist countries that don't have all those pesky "constitutional rights" is that most of the cops just carry tasers since the people aren't allowed to have guns. So I guess that explains that: "You'll feel safer here in this little padded box and we'll feed you twice a day..."
    Last edited by geezer; 07-13-2017, 03:48 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SteveP
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    Euphemisms are fun.

    Are you going to argue there's no DWB problem? Because 10% of the population would like a word with you.
    I'm not going to argue, but this stop doesn't show any evidence of DWB. Oh, and in case you missed it at 2:11 into the video, the officer's partner is black!

    The tint on the windows would make it difficult to determine the race of the driver, especially around dusk as this appears to be. But what would I know about that?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by SteveP View Post
    It's called proactive policing.
    Euphemisms are fun.

    Are you going to argue there's no DWB problem? Because 10% of the population would like a word with you.

    Leave a comment:


  • SteveP
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    What oops? There was nothing "awkward" in his response to her questions, despite the spin by the Newsweak reporter.


    Stops like this happen thousands of times daily across the US and Canada.

    I'd run hundreds of plates through the computer during an 8 or 10 hour shift. Recovered I don't know how many stolen vehicles, arrested IDK how many people for warrants.

    It's called proactive policing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Oops.

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  • Kepler
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by joecct View Post
    What was his favorite dish? Italian? Chinese? Thai?
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B0whodOIIAAqRXu.png:large

    Leave a comment:


  • joecct
    replied
    Originally posted by Kepler View Post
    c.f.: Jeffrey Dahmer wasn't a murderer. He was a chef.
    What was his favorite dish? Italian? Chinese? Thai?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Re: Cops 4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Originally posted by unofan View Post
    Found it:

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...g_BjDms-VdWrxg

    The money line (sorry about the formatting, copying from a PDF on my phone): "Police officers are not trained to “shoot to kill.” Rather, they are trained to shoot to stop an imminent threat. The quickest, most efficient and practical way for a law enforcement officer to forcibly bring about a timely halt to threatening actions is to deprive the subject’s brain of the oxygen necessary to continue conscious action. Because oxygen is carried to the brain by blood, law enforcement officers are trained to aim for center mass where most of the blood-bearing organs are located."

    So they're not trained to kill, they're just trained to deprive the brain of oxygen, something that inherently results in death.
    c.f.: Jeffrey Dahmer wasn't a murderer. He was a chef.

    Leave a comment:


  • unofan
    replied
    Originally posted by unofan View Post
    I'm saying it's doublespeak, nothing more. They say they're trained to "stop the threat" because it plays well to juries in the inevitable lawsuit and it probably gives them some personal absolution in the rare event they have to fire their weapon (I didn't intend to kill that person, I just wanted to stop him).

    But the fact remains that the way they stop the threat is almost inevitably by killing the person. Hell, I previously linked to a former FBI trainer's report on the Cleveland police shooting involving the 12 year old, and her words were even starker. Something along the lines of "the most effective way to stop a threat is to prevent oxygen from reaching the decision-making center" or something to that effect. So they aren't trained to kill, they're just trained to deprive the brain of oxygen through blood loss.

    To any lay person, that sounds a helluva lot like being trained to kill.
    Found it:

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...g_BjDms-VdWrxg

    The money line (sorry about the formatting, copying from a PDF on my phone): "Police officers are not trained to “shoot to kill.” Rather, they are trained to shoot to stop an imminent threat. The quickest, most efficient and practical way for a law enforcement officer to forcibly bring about a timely halt to threatening actions is to deprive the subject’s brain of the oxygen necessary to continue conscious action. Because oxygen is carried to the brain by blood, law enforcement officers are trained to aim for center mass where most of the blood-bearing organs are located."

    So they're not trained to kill, they're just trained to deprive the brain of oxygen, something that inherently results in death.

    Leave a comment:

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