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The Cicadas are Coming!

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  • jericho
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Originally posted by Transplanted Tiger Fan View Post
    I recall a correlation between chirp-rate and temperature taught to me when I was MUCH younger, and also recall confirmation of this age-old-knowledge, however I do not remember the exact details. It was much simpler than the Farmer’s Almanac sited by Joe though (ie - no math)... something like the number of chirps in 30 seconds equates to the Fahrenheit temperature. Although for a valid temperature reading, the key is finding a properly-calibrated cricket.
    Or a thermometer. I hear they work pretty well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Transplanted Tiger Fan
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    I recall a correlation between chirp-rate and temperature taught to me when I was MUCH younger, and also recall confirmation of this age-old-knowledge, however I do not remember the exact details. It was much simpler than the Farmer’s Almanac sited by Joe though (ie - no math)... something like the number of chirps in 30 seconds equates to the Fahrenheit temperature. Although for a valid temperature reading, the key is finding a properly-calibrated cricket.

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Originally posted by joecct View Post
    From the Old Farmer's Almanac...To convert cricket chirps to degrees Fahrenheit, count number of chirps in 14 seconds then add 40 to get temperature.

    Have you ever tried this in practice? if it is 82o F that is three chirps per second (42 chirps in 14 seconds). The trick for me would be to be able to hear one cricket in isolation as there is a regular chorus all going at once.

    Leave a comment:


  • joecct
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
    Who needs cicadas when you have crickets?

    This year the crickets are louder than I've ever heard them where we live. If a cicada is like a percussion instrument, and gets boring pretty quickly since it never varies the rhythm, crickets are like strings: even if they play a simple tune, I could listen to it for hours.
    From the Old Farmer's Almanac...
    To convert cricket chirps to degrees Fahrenheit, count number of chirps in 14 seconds then add 40 to get temperature.

    To convert cricket chirps to degrees Celsius, count number of chirps in 25 seconds, divide by 3, then add 4 to get temperature.

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Who needs cicadas when you have crickets?

    This year the crickets are louder than I've ever heard them where we live. If a cicada is like a percussion instrument, and gets boring pretty quickly since it never varies the rhythm, crickets are like strings: even if they play a simple tune, I could listen to it for hours.

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    While we did not see nor hear a single 17-year cicada, on Friday night we heard the annual cicadas for the first time this summer.

    It always as indicated that summer is shifting into the end of July and the beginning of August when we hear those suckers for several weeks. They'll be followed by crickets and earlier sunsets and in six weeks or so the first hints of autumn will start to appear.

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    According to this article, if you haven't seen any of the 17-year cicadas yet, you probably aren't going to. It appears that a few places in NJ were infested, but many areas that were hyped to get them, are not seeing any at all.

    There's a map in the linked article too.

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Originally posted by Ralph Baer View Post
    Has anyone seen any this year? They have supposedly passed there peak here, and I haven't seen them.
    Have not seen nor heard a single one so far. The last mention in the New Haven Register was May 20, and it's been nearly two weeks since I posted the article from a neighboring community weekly paper. If they appeared there, they haven't appeared where we live, yet.

    I may go to a nearby "open space" area this weekend with lots of trees to see if there are any signs there.


    After all the hype, nothing?? it was truly an epic invasion back in the 1970s in Illinois. This kind of buildup with no follow-through damages the credibility of "experts."

    Leave a comment:


  • Ralph Baer
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Has anyone seen any this year? They have supposedly passed there peak here, and I haven't seen them.

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    First news I've heard of cicadas actually being seen emerging from the ground in CT. We haven't seen any near our house yet but where we live is generally cooler than the place cited in the article.

    http://www.zip06.com/apps/pbcs.dll/g...ipshoregallery

    http://www.zip06.com/article/2013052...=shorezip06art

    The entomologist in some of the pictures is wearing a T-shirt that says

    Sing
    Fly
    Mate
    Die

    Leave a comment:


  • French Rage
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Onion headline that for some reason I found really funny: "17-year cicadas horrified to learn about 9/11"

    Leave a comment:


  • Hammer
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    That might be because Jen broke her mixer.

    /knows he probably just got himself in trouble.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ralph Baer
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
    Cicadas, a culinary delicacy?



    "I respect the cicada." Great line.
    No one has posted anything on the Lunch thread yet about eating cicadas.

    Leave a comment:


  • FreshFish
    replied
    Re: The Cicadas are Coming!

    Cicadas, a culinary delicacy?

    Bun Lai, owner of Miya’s Sushi in New Haven, Conn., and one of the city’s best known chefs, has a few gastronomic plans for the bumper crop of periodical cicadas expected to emerge along the Eastern seaboard in a couple of weeks. He’ll be cooking up batches of the critters for himself and possibly for certain, select customers.

    ....

    Along with the intense public fascination over the creatures comes a healthy curiosity about people who are willing to eat cicadas.

    There are a fair number of these folks, actually. They even create recipes with cicadas, everything from tacos and cookies to dumplings and pizza.

    Aficionados report that the meatier, young female cicadas taste best. They also note that cultures such as the Native American Iroquois tribe in upstate New York considered cicadas a delicacy.

    ....

    Lai is going to steam some cicadas with ground spices and herbs — in a fashion similar to the way Maryland crabs are prepared. He’s also going to do a cicada boil with spices and herbs.

    “The challenge is to take an ingredient that’s abundant and nourishing and make it appealing to people,” he said. “I’m not trying to gross people out. I’m not running a frat house. I respect the cicada.”
    "I respect the cicada." Great line.

    Leave a comment:


  • aparch
    replied
    Originally posted by Patman View Post
    If its as intense as the Illinois brood its going to a long month or so.
    Yeah. It was an annoying summer. A few outdoor concerts at Ravinia had to be cancelled because the cicadas were louder than the orchestra/performers.

    Leave a comment:

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