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  • Originally posted by Proud2baLaker View Post
    I have yet to see any orioles use any of my nectar feedings. Both in the Midwest (Illinois/Indiana) and out west (Idaho). But I have had a downy woodpecker use my nectar feeder once. That was cool.
    From what I've read, nectar feeders are great for early in the season and late in the season. But during the summer you're best served by grape jelly and meal worms.
    Code:
    As of 9/21/10:         As of 9/13/10:
    College Hockey 6       College Football 0
    BTHC 4                 WCHA FC:  1
    Originally posted by SanTropez
    May your paint thinner run dry and the fleas of a thousand camels infest your dead deer.
    Originally posted by bigblue_dl
    I don't even know how to classify magic vagina smoke babies..
    Originally posted by Kepler
    When the giraffes start building radio telescopes they can join too.
    He's probably going to be a superstar but that man has more baggage than North West

    Comment


    • Originally posted by leswp1 View Post
      I have a pair of orioles- they are skittish and complain a lot. They do not drink the nectar but LOVE grape jelly. Unfortunately the squirrels have started to raid the nectar feeders. So aggravating!
      Interesting. Our squirrels have left the nectar alone. It's the GD raccoons that drink it like it's going out of style.
      Code:
      As of 9/21/10:         As of 9/13/10:
      College Hockey 6       College Football 0
      BTHC 4                 WCHA FC:  1
      Originally posted by SanTropez
      May your paint thinner run dry and the fleas of a thousand camels infest your dead deer.
      Originally posted by bigblue_dl
      I don't even know how to classify magic vagina smoke babies..
      Originally posted by Kepler
      When the giraffes start building radio telescopes they can join too.
      He's probably going to be a superstar but that man has more baggage than North West

      Comment


      • Since we talked orioles: Today let's look at the Bullock's Oriole

        The Bullock's is the oriole of the west. Breeding range is from from mid-Texas up to eastern Montana and over to the Pacific in California. They winter in central and southern Mexico. There is some overlap in range with the Baltimore oriole in the plains states and they will hybridize. The two used to be clumped into one species, the Northern oriole, but after genetic testing, were separated into the two species as they were not very closely related. Like many orioles, they weave hanging nest. They too enjoy sweets during the migration periods but will focus mostly on insects during the rest of the year. Though open woodlands are listed as their prime habitat, I almost always find them in riparian areas.

        The first photo below is of a male Bullock's. Taken one of my first outings with my camera. The 2nd is also a male and came from the same outing. Doesn't show as much of the bird but I like it because you can see that it has found a large grub type thing.




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        • These pics are gold

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          • Thank you!

            For today to finish out the week: The Violet-green Swallow

            Like many of the birds I post, this swallow is native west of the Rockies up into interior Alaska (breeding range only) and winters in Mexico and parts of Central America. You'll find these acrobats flying over/near lakes and streams picking off insects as they make tight turns and twists. They are quite fast, clocking in at up to 28 mph. In the right light, you can see where their name comes from as the feathers on the backs and head become vivid and iridescent.

            One of the interesting facts I recently learned, is that at one time, a pair of these swallows was observed assisting a pair of Western Bluebirds in raising their young. The swallows would guard the nest and tend to the nestlings. After the bluebirds fledged, the swallows then used the nest to raise their own young. Whether this is a common thing or a one-off I am not certain. But based on what I could find it is not common but still could happen obviously.

            The pic below came after a day of scouting a new stream/river to fly fish. I wandered around to see what I could find. I didn't have many photos of swallows of any kind because they always seem to be in flight. And when they were perched, it seemed a bit to far away. I had to use max zoom for this guy. You can just start to see how vibrant the colors could be. The 2nd and 3rd pics came from an outing a few weeks earlier. That 3rd one gives me a little chuckle as its a nice action shot of getting that itch. Again, these next 2 were about at max zoom to get.





            Comment


            • Originally posted by dxmnkd316 View Post
              But during the summer you're best served by grape jelly ...
              ... and the cheap low-end stuff (higher sugar content) is what they go through more of at my feeders.

              The preceding post may contain trigger words and is not safe-space approved. <-- Virtue signaling.

              North Dakota Hockey:

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              • Looking back a few pages, some of the previous pics aren't showing up anymore. Does anyone know if this is normal? Or why that might be happening?

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Proud2baLaker View Post
                  Looking back a few pages, some of the previous pics aren't showing up anymore. Does anyone know if this is normal? Or why that might be happening?
                  Several of my recent pics posted here disappeared after a few days. I'm sure there's code that hunts and kills links that fall afoul of some rule, and I'm fine with that, but why not just block the original posting?
                  Cornell University
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                  • Originally posted by Kepler View Post

                    Several of my recent pics posted here disappeared after a few days. I'm sure there's code that hunts and kills links that fall afoul of some rule, and I'm fine with that, but why not just block the original posting?
                    Looks like anything older than a month is currently gone. I have one from 5/31 still up but not one from 5/20. If that 5/31 disappears in the next few days, there would be the possible pattern I guess.

                    Comment


                    • Grape jelly, you said?

                      dx this you??

                      https://bringmethenews.com/minnesota...vy5g&fs=e&s=cl

                      Comment


                      • Lmao. Ya got me


                        ;-)
                        Code:
                        As of 9/21/10:         As of 9/13/10:
                        College Hockey 6       College Football 0
                        BTHC 4                 WCHA FC:  1
                        Originally posted by SanTropez
                        May your paint thinner run dry and the fleas of a thousand camels infest your dead deer.
                        Originally posted by bigblue_dl
                        I don't even know how to classify magic vagina smoke babies..
                        Originally posted by Kepler
                        When the giraffes start building radio telescopes they can join too.
                        He's probably going to be a superstar but that man has more baggage than North West

                        Comment


                        • Still bummed pics get removed after a while. Oh well.

                          Realized its been a long time since I shared some.

                          Today: The Black-headed Grosbeak. Native from the western plains, through the Rockies and to the Pacific coast during the breeding season and overwintering in Mexico. The striking orange on their bodies is striking against the black of the head. Both male and females will sing and both will also incubate eggs about equally. Traits not terribly common in a lot of song birds. They are one of the few birds that can eat Monarch butterflies. However, they have been observed eating them in roughly 8-day cycles, presumably to prevent and eliminate any potential buildup of toxins. During the migration I managed to finally attract some to my feeders this past spring. They appeared to mainly feed on sunflower but I think some went after the millet/milo seed as well.

                          This little fact from allaboutbirds.com is neat too:
                          • The Black-headed Grosbeak's scientific names are both well-suited. Its species name, melanocephalus, means "black-headed.” And its genus name, Pheucticus, refers either to the Greek pheuticus for "shy" or phycticus meaning "painted with cosmetics," fitting for a showy bird that forages in dense foliage.
                          Here I have two pics. The first is the best pic of one I have. He sat still in pretty good light to give a great view of color. The second was more shy but I got a nice framing effect through the foliage of one munching on some berries. Enjoy.




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                          • Wow!

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