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The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

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  • Re: The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

    Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
    yes, that's why we no longer own one. While I (occasionally, albeit rarely) miss having one, we did trade it in, and we got a $4,000 credit for the trade-in to boot!

    (even though it was only worth $1,800 and needed about $900 in repairs before it would even be worth that much).

    and the replacement gets about 32 mpg compared to about 14 mpg. There's a big difference between the occasional daydream and quotidian reality!
    The defense rests.

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    • Re: The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

      Originally posted by LynahFan View Post
      I never understand this line of thinking. You wish you had a truck, what - 3-4 times per year? The annual cost difference between a truck and a car is many thousands of dollars, so just buy the car and rent a pickup whenever you need one. I did the same thing when I wanted a 2-seater as my daily driver: just sucked it up and rented a car every time I had more than one guest. In the grand scheme of things, that added virtually nothing to the cost of owning my fun car.

      Unless you're really using a pickup for actual hauling or 4-wheeling at least a couple times per month, it doesn't make economic sense to buy one - if you own one, your decision was based on want, not need.
      T r a i l e r . . . . .

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      • Re: The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

        Originally posted by LynahFan View Post
        See, that's where I think you're taking the wrong approach. Don't think of it as adding $30 to the cost of the drywall - think of it as subtracting $30 from the many thousands you saved by selling your truck and buying your car. $30 is a drop in that bucket.
        Clearly you're not an economist. In economics, decisions are made "at the margin": given where I am right now, what's the most effective decision going forward?
        "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

        "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

        "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

        "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

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        • Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
          Clearly you're not an economist. In economics, decisions are made "at the margin": given where I am right now, what's the most effective decision going forward?
          This makes no sense in this discussion. What do you suggest would be the "economist's" solution to getting a $12 sheet of drywall home when he doesn't own a truck? He has to make the "decision" to shell out the $30 just like everyone else. The only difference I'm suggesting is psychological, not substantive.
          If you don't change the world today, how can it be any better tomorrow?

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          • Re: The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

            Originally posted by LynahFan View Post
            This makes no sense in this discussion. What do you suggest would be the "economist's" solution to getting a $12 sheet of drywall home when he doesn't own a truck? He has to make the "decision" to shell out the $30 just like everyone else. The only difference I'm suggesting is psychological, not substantive.
            Cutting it to size in the parking lot has worked just fine so far.....
            "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

            "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

            "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

            "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

            Comment


            • Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
              Cutting it to size in the parking lot has worked just fine so far.....
              Never needed a full sheet? What are you building? Dollhouses?
              ;-)
              I believe in life, and I believe in love, but the world in which I live in keeps trying to prove me wrong.

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              • Re: The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

                Originally posted by pirate View Post
                Never needed a full sheet? What are you building? Dollhouses?
                I rented a truck last summer to bring home about a dozen full sheets for the full walls, sheets of plywood for the new subfloor, all the molding, the wainscoting, etc. etc. They sat on the front porch for over a year as I slowly worked my way through them (the molding is still on the porch, sigh). I needed one more sheet of the mold-resistant stuff for the space behind the toilet and sink in the bathroom.
                "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

                "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

                "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

                "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

                Comment


                • Re: The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

                  About 58.7% of the eligible US workforce is "officially" employed. That's a problem. Workforce participation rate is 63.2% and unemployment is 7.3%. College and high school kids aren't looking for jobs the way they used to, and the Baby Boomers are retiring, making this figure worse, though the Baby Boomer figure is more expected than the kids sitting at home. Still, the job market is weak, causing a great number of eligible people in this country to stop looking for work.

                  The only possible positive from this - a huge stretch to call it such - is that we know there's a black market for labor. Hopefully those people not looking for jobs are getting paid under the table.

                  http://money.cnn.com/2013/09/06/news...source=cnn_bin
                  "The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." George Orwell, 1984

                  "One does not simply walk into Mordor. Its Black Gates are guarded by more than just Orcs. There is evil there that does not sleep, and the Great Eye is ever watchful. It is a barren wasteland, riddled with fire and ash and dust, the very air you breathe is a poisonous fume." Boromir

                  "Good news! We have a delivery." Professor Farnsworth

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                  • Re: The Most Serious [x] Problem We Face Today

                    Originally posted by St. Clown View Post
                    About 58.7% of the eligible US workforce is "officially" employed. That's a problem. Workforce participation rate is 63.2% and unemployment is 7.3%. College and high school kids aren't looking for jobs the way they used to, and the Baby Boomers are retiring, making this figure worse, though the Baby Boomer figure is more expected than the kids sitting at home. Still, the job market is weak, causing a great number of eligible people in this country to stop looking for work.

                    The only possible positive from this - a huge stretch to call it such - is that we know there's a black market for labor. Hopefully those people not looking for jobs are getting paid under the table.

                    http://money.cnn.com/2013/09/06/news...source=cnn_bin
                    Here is an article with more detail: http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/the-e...175850505.html

                    The boomers aren't retiring, they are hogging all the jobs. Why would the greed end now?

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