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1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

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  • MountieBoyOz
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by SteveF View Post
    PA is wrong too. Only Philly is cheesesteaks, the rest are yokels and rednecks
    Ask the people covering the Penn State situation. They'll agree with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • SteveF
    replied
    Originally posted by joecct View Post
    Actually New York is wrong. There are two New Yorks. The New York City area (including Long Island) and "upstate" which is usually described as north of Yonkers.
    PA is wrong too. Only Philly is cheesesteaks, the rest are yokels and rednecks

    Leave a comment:


  • bigblue_dl
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    That test really wasn't that difficult if you take questions that are obviously dated to that time and reshape them to fit 2011.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ralph Baer
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by state of hockey View Post
    It's true. Dutchess County is pretty much Canada.
    Putnam County is also Canada.

    Leave a comment:


  • state of hockey
    replied
    It's true. Dutchess County is pretty much Canada.

    Leave a comment:


  • joecct
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by Brenthoven View Post
    Actually New York is wrong. There are two New Yorks. The New York City area (including Long Island) and "upstate" which is usually described as north of Yonkers.

    Leave a comment:


  • UMDbulldogs#1
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by Brenthoven View Post
    That's pretty funny.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepler
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by LynahFan View Post
    Within a requirements document, each SHALL is numbered so that it can be linked to its verification plans, procedures, and documentation, and so that lower-level requirements (e.g. in the requirements document for a pump) can be traced to higher-level requirements (for the fuel system). There's an entire sub-field within Systems Engineering just having to do with requirements management - a typical aircraft design program will have probably around 100 people who just track SHALLs for a living.
    God bless RTMs! Now for real excitement, tell us about BOEs!

    (If you had told me at age ten I would be doing this for a living, I'd have shot myself.)

    BTW, I'd love to see a SOW or Proposal with "may" in it. "We may do that... or... we may not." The way "mayness" is generally expressed in our industry is "The Contractor shall use industry best practices in selecting...," which basically means, "we'll let you figure it out as you go along, and that may or may not be the way we expect you to do it. If anything goes wrong, see you at the deposition."
    Last edited by Kepler; 12-07-2011, 11:51 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • LynahFan
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by Twitch Boy View Post
    I've always been told "shall" is the generally accepted usage to duty-bind someone to do something in a contract. "Will" is more used just to indicate something that is going to happen, but isn't duty-bound to any of the contractors. "This contract will terminate X days from now."

    "May" is used to denote something being an allowable option. "Should" means you recommend it, but it's not required (most likely due to whatever it is being unable to be quantified.)
    This is certainly the case in the aerospace industry. "Shall" indicates a contractually binding requirement which must be verified and documented (e.g. The refuel system SHALL refuel the plane in 10 minutes from empty to full). "Will" is simply a statement of intent or a goal/desire which may not be verifiable (e.g. The refuel system WILL be easy to use).

    Within a requirements document, each SHALL is numbered so that it can be linked to its verification plans, procedures, and documentation, and so that lower-level requirements (e.g. in the requirements document for a pump) can be traced to higher-level requirements (for the fuel system). There's an entire sub-field within Systems Engineering just having to do with requirements management - a typical aircraft design program will have probably around 100 people who just track SHALLs for a living.

    Leave a comment:


  • MountieBoyOz
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by Ralph Baer View Post
    The Turnpike does allow one to get through NJ a lot faster.
    So you can escape the garbage smell that much faster.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ralph Baer
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by joecct View Post
    We native New Jerseyites LOVE the Turnpike!! Over 100 miles of road with no speed limit!!

    Just keep to the right and use your signal when changing lanes.
    The Turnpike does allow one to get through NJ a lot faster.

    Leave a comment:


  • joecct
    replied
    Originally posted by Beer Pong Horn View Post
    Hell, I'm not even from the east coast, and I think the WORLD ends on the New Jersey Turnpike.
    We native New Jerseyites LOVE the Turnpike!! Over 100 miles of road with no speed limit!!

    Just keep to the right and use your signal when changing lanes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Twitch Boy
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by Tundra View Post
    Ha, I don't think I could pass it without studying.

    I noticed one question because it came up on a debate at a city council meeting few years ago and they (mostly lawyers) spent 20min+ over amending a bill. replacing "shall" with "will" .... at the end they decided to leave it as is. company (shall will) do xxx supposedly (will) forced company to do xxx while (shall) allowed options for the company.

    So what is the correct usage: I (guess think) I (shall will) go.
    I've always been told "shall" is the generally accepted usage to duty-bind someone to do something in a contract. "Will" is more used just to indicate something that is going to happen, but isn't duty-bound to any of the contractors. "This contract will terminate X days from now."

    "May" is used to denote something being an allowable option. "Should" means you recommend it, but it's not required (most likely due to whatever it is being unable to be quantified.)
    Last edited by Twitch Boy; 12-07-2011, 02:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tundra
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by joecct View Post
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...on/v/tests.pdf

    You had to pass this test to go to high school. Think this batch of 8th graders could pass this? Could you?
    Ha, I don't think I could pass it without studying.

    I noticed one question because it came up on a debate at a city council meeting few years ago and they (mostly lawyers) spent 20min+ over amending a bill. replacing "shall" with "will" .... at the end they decided to leave it as is. company (shall will) do xxx supposedly (will) forced company to do xxx while (shall) allowed options for the company.

    So what is the correct usage: I (guess think) I (shall will) go.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Rube
    replied
    Re: 1931 West Virginia 8th grade graduation exam

    Originally posted by UMDbulldogs#1 View Post
    And this surprises you? Most people from the East think the US ends at the New Jersey turnpike.
    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-T...o/new-york.jpg

    (language)

    Leave a comment:

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