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  • Re: Garden Geeks thread

    Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
    A question both for you and for Walrus....how is the junction on those? We had a hose reel that worked fine as far as storing hoses goes; however there always was a small leak somewhere in each one of them.
    It's amazingly leak free, unlike my plastic one. The feeder hose comes in the back center of the reel, and attaches to a brass 90 degree elbow. The hose on the reel comes through a gap in the face of the reel, attaches to that elbow, and is strapped down with a heavy duty zip fastener. The fact that the thing is guaranteed for a full 10 years says a lot. The reel can also mount parallel or perpendicular to the wall. Pretty snazzy, if pricey.
    "This world is your world. Take it easy, but take it." - Woody Guthrie

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    • Re: Garden Geeks thread

      Never drain the hose, don't believe I have any leaks in the swivel either. Been on my house 5 years or so. Mine has a brass swivel with O Rings not plastic crap.
      http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...6747_200466747
      Last edited by walrus; 06-11-2012, 07:47 PM.
      I swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell.

      Maine Hockey Love it or Leave it

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      • Re: Garden Geeks thread

        Originally posted by FiveHole12 View Post
        Heads up gals... there's men in here talking about their hoses.
        Actually, they're talking about blowing their hoses! ;-)
        Originally posted by mookie1995
        bc is superior to bu in nearly everything. while it is sad that it has come to it, it's the truth. if bu doesn't like it, improve.
        Rep from Hokydad -"and your an old never been piece of ****"

        Originally Posted by Dirty
        Why is anyone surprised that Old Pio is acting like a grumpy old f^ck? He is a grumpy old f^ck.

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        • Re: Garden Geeks thread

          Cucumbers and jalapenos have flowers on them already. Strawberries still ripening - I still need to put netting over them. I only have 4 plants, so it should be no problem to cover them (I haven't actually noticed the birds and bunnies taking them - but I have plenty of both around).

          This year I had trouble coming up with enough things to plant in the garden, because everything seems to grow better in pots (except cucumbers and the perennial stuff). Thinking of adding a raspberry plant, but is it worth it to just have one?

          Didn't do the gutter garden thing - I added 2 window boxes to the patio instead. Very happy with the result.

          A couple years ago, I planted some hostas under my magnolia (because nothing grows there). Thinking of expanding the area, but not sure what shady plants I should use (could do different types of hostas, I guess, since they seem to do well).

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          • Re: Garden Geeks thread

            Originally posted by jen View Post
            This year I had trouble coming up with enough things to plant in the garden, because everything seems to grow better in pots (except cucumbers and the perennial stuff). Thinking of adding a raspberry plant, but is it worth it to just have one?
            I'm not a horticulturist, and so my answer to this question might be off.....generally however you need at least two plants so that they can pollinate each other.

            In our experience, setting aside a plot exclusively for raspberries provides one of our highest yielding areas, both in terms of flavor and for duration (only the green beans consistently do better). Our raspberry patch is 3' x 8' and it keeps wanting to get bigger. We are lucky to have a pretty decent size available for gardening.

            One more thing to consider about raspberries, if your garden space is limited, is that they are very hardy! You can stick them somewhere else that's not in your garden and still have decent yield from them.
            "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

            "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

            "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

            "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

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            • Re: Garden Geeks thread

              Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
              I'm not a horticulturist, and so my answer to this question might be off.....generally however you need at least two plants so that they can pollinate each other.

              In our experience, setting aside a plot exclusively for raspberries provides one of our highest yielding areas, both in terms of flavor and for duration (only the green beans consistently do better). Our raspberry patch is 3' x 8' and it keeps wanting to get bigger. We are lucky to have a pretty decent size available for gardening.

              One more thing to consider about raspberries, if your garden space is limited, is that they are very hardy! You can stick them somewhere else that's not in your garden and still have decent yield from them.
              They also spread like a bugger!

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              • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                Any ideas on the following problem?

                We start our green beans in successive plantings, to extend the harvest season. Plant a row, cover it with remay for three weeks or so; plant a new row and move remay over from old row since seedlings are now on second set of true leaves.

                Uncovered a row yesterday and about 1/4 of the plants had no leaves!

                If it's not a mammal eating them (no sign of any burrowing activity), what might it be? slugs perhaps? something that either was under the remay from the start or that could move under (it's only held down with a few rocks along the sides so a creepy crawly could find a way under somewhere...)

                We're hoping that with the remay off the predation will now stop.







                Meanwhile, the raspberries have just started to ripen. This year, we spread deer netting* over the top, leaving the sides open, hoping it will keep the birds away at least so that we can harvest more of what they can't get to. Our strawberry patch is only 6' x 4 feet but with the new cover we built, the increase in what we can harvest is astonishing. After this morning we are now over 7 quarts with plenty more still ripening. I'm getting close to "harvest fatigue", that condition in which the novelty of the first berries has worn off and picking is less a joy and more a chore....even went out to get a bottle of rum so that we can take the "excess" strawberries and toss them in a blender to make fresh strawberry dacquiris!







                * deer netting is exactly like bird netting but with a larger grid.
                "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

                "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

                "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

                "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

                Comment


                • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                  Originally posted by FreshFish View Post
                  Any ideas on the following problem?

                  We start our green beans in successive plantings, to extend the harvest season. Plant a row, cover it with remay for three weeks or so; plant a new row and move remay over from old row since seedlings are now on second set of true leaves.

                  Uncovered a row yesterday and about 1/4 of the plants had no leaves!

                  If it's not a mammal eating them (no sign of any burrowing activity), what might it be? slugs perhaps? something that either was under the remay from the start or that could move under (it's only held down with a few rocks along the sides so a creepy crawly could find a way under somewhere...)

                  We're hoping that with the remay off the predation will now stop.
                  I know we've had problems in the past with rabbits just mowing off our pole beans as they sprout. Now, aside from the 7' fence they grow on, they're surrounded by another 2' fence of chicken wire. Problem solved. Although I do remember about 10 years ago, when they were in a different location, the beans getting eaten right down to the ground. So I replanted and put 3 feet of fence around them. Problem solved, until they cleared the 3' fence where they were promptly mowed off again. I attributed it to deer that time, since I've never seen rabbits climb fence. Not in this life, anyways.
                  Last edited by Carter; 06-18-2012, 09:07 AM.
                  "This world is your world. Take it easy, but take it." - Woody Guthrie

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                  • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                    Chipmunks and birds get mine. I use black plastic net which seems to help.

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                    • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                      I shouldn't have said I hadn't seen evidence of critters in the strawberries. First ripe berries were plucked clean today (I guess the netting wasn't enough). Little mother****ers. So now I have two plastic fences around them and netting over the top.

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                      • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                        Originally posted by jen View Post
                        I shouldn't have said I hadn't seen evidence of critters in the strawberries. First ripe berries were plucked clean today (I guess the netting wasn't enough). Little mother****ers. So now I have two plastic fences around them and netting over the top.
                        Yeah, that's the most frustrating aspect of the whole situation. The little fockers are very smart about judging ripeness. You'll be watching a few strawberries for days, getting redder and redder, and then poof, they're gone. It grinds my beans.
                        "This world is your world. Take it easy, but take it." - Woody Guthrie

                        Comment


                        • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                          Originally posted by jen View Post
                          A couple years ago, I planted some hostas under my magnolia (because nothing grows there). Thinking of expanding the area, but not sure what shady plants I should use (could do different types of hostas, I guess, since they seem to do well).
                          I have these (primrose) planted in shade with hosta and they are doing great. Been there for years and they're really starting to have beautiful, long flowering seasons now. Scroll down to see the purple color of my plants.

                          Plant them in front of the hosta as they only grow about 6"-12" high.
                          'Eavesdropped the BC forum in USCHO. A range of intellects over there. Mostly gentlemen, but a couple of coarse imbeciles' - academic_index, a Brown fan

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                          • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                            Originally posted by jen View Post
                            I shouldn't have said I hadn't seen evidence of critters in the strawberries. First ripe berries were plucked clean today (I guess the netting wasn't enough). Little mother****ers. So now I have two plastic fences around them and netting over the top.
                            I had plastic fence around our garden one year. Bunnies ate right through it. Best defense we have had have been the hawks when they nested near our yard one year and when the coyote was hanging around.

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                            • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                              Originally posted by goldy_331 View Post
                              I had plastic fence around our garden one year. Bunnies ate right through it. Best defense we have had have been the hawks when they nested near our yard one year and when the coyote was hanging around.
                              I don't think I'd want to meet those bunnies in a dark alley. I looked at the fences again, and they're both metal - I'm pretty sure I'm safe, unless the bunnies have been doing a lot of squats and can hop 2 feet high and crash through the netting (in which case... I think they deserve a strawberry)

                              Thanks for all the tips, though - this thread is very helpful for someone who has no idea what they're doing, like me.

                              Originally posted by FiveHole12 View Post
                              I have these (primrose) planted in shade with hosta and they are doing great. Been there for years and they're really starting to have beautiful, long flowering seasons now. Scroll down to see the purple color of my plants.

                              Plant them in front of the hosta as they only grow about 6"-12" high.
                              Thanks! I like those - will look for them.

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                              • Re: Garden Geeks thread

                                The raspberries have just started ripening, picked a quart yesterday. We are trying an experiment this year in which we spread bird netting only over the top, leaving the sides open to make harvesting easier. The birds can have whatever falls to the ground. We've heard that they won't land on the branches if they are unable to fly away; we'll see how that works.

                                With the strawberries, it's almost become "be careful what you wish for." Our 4'x6' patch has already yielded over 7 quarts with plenty more still ripening. With my work schedule and all the children (er, offspring as they are now young adults) away this summer, I barely can keep up with harvesting the ones that ripen before they start to rot!

                                Peapods have started to form on the peas, will probably start picking this weekend. Yum! They almost never make it indoors, just too tasty to resist popping them open right then and there.
                                "Hope is a good thing; maybe the best of things."

                                "Beer is a sign that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

                                "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy." -- W. B. Yeats

                                "People generally are most impatient with those flaws in others about which they are most ashamed of in themselves." - folk wisdom

                                Comment

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