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  • OldDave
    replied
    Originally posted by DDad16 View Post

    I was curious about myocarditis.... I saw a statistic from a UofM Medicine article that stated about 20 percent of sudden deaths in young adults are linked to myocarditis. Interesting for sure. Again, just wondering why it is being considered big news now.
    I have not been following the discussions here. We have a cottage off the grid that was hit by a bad storm three or four weeks ago, and I have been busy getting power restored and cleaning up down trees and broken branches. I feel like I have been living in a Hemingway novel: The Old Man and the Pole Saw. Most years, I would have spread the work over several seasons, but we have friends and relatives who want to use the cottage for self quarantine as they flee back to Minnesota to escape brutal heat in Arizona and California.

    However, DDad asks a question that I actually can answer. I mentioned in a post about a month ago that my wife's cardiologist chatted extensively with her during an annual visit. The doctor works at U of Mn hospitals, and she may well have participated in the study DDad mentions. The doctor was mentioning her concern about the fact that C-19 (I like this abbreviation) was causing myocarditis in patients, and that it was causing it at a rate higher than the other diseases that cause myocarditis.

    So now we have a population of previously healthy people who have preexisting conditions caused by C-19. When next these folks get C-19, which looks like it may be around Christmas, they will be at greater risk of dying. I wonder how the bulltweeters will spin those deaths, since the underlying conditions were caused by C-19.



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  • DDad16
    replied
    Originally posted by robertearle View Post
    "One-third of COVID-19 positive Big Ten athletes have myocarditis, Penn State athletic doctor says"


    https://www.yahoo.com/sports/big-ten...164111708.html
    I was curious about myocarditis. As I read this article, it looks like several factors (meaning, before C-19) can cause this issue. I'm not trying to downplay this, as it can be very serious, I'm just wondering why is this coming about now? There are cases from Influenza, the common cold, bacteria (I'm sure many of you have seen the places these students live).

    I would imagine any student-athlete that has been diagnosed with C-19 should have a cardiac checkup as well. They are recommending it in the office my wife works. Potentially (maybe) setting the stage for getting checked after having influenza, or any other seasonal cold. I saw a statistic from a UofM Medicine article that stated about 20 percent of sudden deaths in young adults are linked to myocarditis. Interesting for sure. Again, just wondering why it is being considered big news now.

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...s/syc-20352539

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  • robertearle
    replied
    "One-third of COVID-19 positive Big Ten athletes have myocarditis, Penn State athletic doctor says"


    https://www.yahoo.com/sports/big-ten...164111708.html

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  • giwan
    replied
    There was a vote 11-3 against. Why it was hidden and denied is the question.

    Originally posted by Timothy A View Post

    Yeah, and they pulled the plug SO early it was really dumb. At least they have the ability to change their minds. I think the c19 will run rampant on college campuses, that is the wild card. There's no way to bubble like the nba and nhl. They could have set up team specific dorms to keep them together and also limit their outside contacts.

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  • Reddington
    replied
    Sounds like we have common ground! It sounds like my grandmother's sage advice of don't cry over spilled milk with a modem twist.

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  • robertearle
    replied
    Originally posted by Timothy A View Post
    At least they have the ability to change their minds.
    I happened to see an interview with Barry Alvarez last night, and he addressed this very idea.

    He told the interviewer that he was in a meeting recently with other Big Ten coaches and ADs. And what he told them was "It is Sunday, You lost your game on Saturday, It's over. There's no point in worrying about that game and that loss. Time to make a plan for the next game. Time to make a plan to move forward."

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  • Timothy A
    replied
    Originally posted by Reddington View Post
    Still trying to figure out how the Commish postponed s Big 10 without a vote. I see no schedules for many schools. I have no problem watching the pro games without fans so I'm sure college would be okay too.
    Yeah, and they pulled the plug SO early it was really dumb. At least they have the ability to change their minds. I think the c19 will run rampant on college campuses, that is the wild card. There's no way to bubble like the nba and nhl. They could have set up team specific dorms to keep them together and also limit their outside contacts.

    Leave a comment:


  • robertearle
    replied
    Originally posted by Reddington View Post
    Still trying to figure out how the Commish postponed s Big 10 without a vote. I see no schedules for many schools. I have no problem watching the pro games without fans so I'm sure college would be okay too.
    I've seen articles that said the vote was 11-to-3, and I've seen articles that say 'there was no vote... but the outcome was 11-to-3'. Irrelevant semantic games. IMO.

    Eg. - https://www.detroitnews.com/story/sp...ay/3451497001/


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  • Reddington
    replied
    Still trying to figure out how the Commish postponed s Big 10 without a vote. I see no schedules for many schools. I have no problem watching the pro games without fans so I'm sure college would be okay too.

    Leave a comment:


  • DDad16
    replied
    I was speaking to a Division 1 Men's coach this past weekend and he was stating that Hockey was going to fall on the coattails of NCAA Basketball. His statement was, being that March Madness is the biggest money maker for the NCAA, the NCAA was going to work very hard to have their season and March Madness. His thinking is that, in the long run, this would help in terms of having a hockey season.

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  • Timothy A
    replied
    Originally posted by ARM View Post
    Jacky Handy references are always good.
    The situation lacks sufficient fairness for me to want to blame any victims.
    I love Jack Handy. He didn't make a very good Senator though.

    I'm not so much has blaming the the victim as I'm saying they should accept responsibility IF their behavior was not cautious. If I get it, is it my fault? I am wearing a mask in all cases in buildings that are not mine, but my handwashing has fallen off from what is required.

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  • ARM
    replied
    Originally posted by Timothy A View Post
    Deep thoughts, not by Jack Handy....
    Jacky Handy references are always good.

    Originally posted by Timothy A View Post
    At what point do we say, "if you get covid, it's your own fault"?
    That's painting with a rather broad brush. I'm hesitant to lump everyone together. There are likely residents of sparsely-populated states who have yet to come within a mile of anyone capable of transmitting the virus, while residents of urban centers have been walking through a minefield in comparison. Similarly, my company has instructed us to work from home since March, but health care and transportation workers and others like them don't have that option. Some have taken an attitude of, "If I get it, I get it," and haven't taken precautions yet remained healthy, while others did their level best to follow guidelines and came down with the virus anyway.

    The situation lacks sufficient fairness for me to want to blame any victims.

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  • robertearle
    replied
    Originally posted by Cornholio View Post
    Does not surprise me that the issues of liability would not come up with a non-revenue sport ...
    I don't know of any place to see a sport-by-sport breakdown of expenses and revenues for UW athletics, but I'd be willing to bet that selling out a 7000 seat venue 15-to-20 times a year makes volleyball at UW a "revenue sport". Not to a 'football' level, of course, but still...

    ---------

    Adding: I found one article from 2018 that said the 2016 team generated a bit over $2.5 million. 2016 was before attendance capacity at the Field House was expanded from 6,000 to 7,000, and about the time that BTN started televising more games. So, the 2019 team undoubtedly generated more than that, and the 2020 team in a normal season would likely have generated more again.

    I also did a quick google on how much a pro woman VB player can make playing in a top league in Europe or Russia, etc, - like former UW player Lauren Carlini is and current player Dana Redtke undoubtedly will be - and the answer was at least $100K and as much as $500K. Average players in lesser leagues much less, $20K or $50K, etc; mostly they're there to see Europe, play some VB and come home will some money made.
    Last edited by robertearle; 08-15-2020, 12:17 PM.

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  • Cornholio
    replied
    Does not surprise me that the issues of liability would not come up with a non-revenue sport as it is a much taller hurdle to say it was in the school's interest to 'pressure' an athlete to play when there was no monetary benefit back to the school and the athlete is guaranteed their scholarship if they play or not. Very different for P5 football.

    Here is an article, including specific 'what-if' references to how things would play out in Wisconsin (amongst other states): https://touchdownwire.usatoday.com/l...tball-in-2020/

    Also, and I have seen this on many athletic forums, with the lack of sport to talk about (remember when we would simply discuss the state of a women's hockey program, what they need to do to turn things around, how exciting this or that player will be?) bringing everyone together of different backgrounds and values, how quickly things turn nasty (especially political) when the common thread bringing everyone together (the sport) is no longer there. I really fear what kind of societal changes will result if this is indeed a true 'new normal'.

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  • FiveHoleFrenzy
    replied
    Originally posted by ARM View Post
    I have disagreed with Robert over the years. I have learned that he tries to be accurate, he tries to be truthful, and if he learns that he was wrong about something, he will admit to it. He has earned my respect as a contrarian (which isn't the right word, but neither is debater nor opponent).

    These are things that I think to be true about the current situation:

    1) Nobody on this forum wants people to die from Covid-19, or any other cause.
    2) Everyone on this forum would like hockey to be played safely, at both the youth and collegiate level.
    3) Covid-19 is something that nobody had heard of a year ago, and part of the reason that we disagree about how to deal with it is that the facts of the disease are still more like theories.

    So why is it political? Partly because due to 3), we disagree about how to best achieve 1) and 2) simultaneously, or if both can be achieved. Also, love him or hate him, I think that most would agree that our President likes to be the focus of attention, and when he is involved, everything gets political.

    Given all of that, can we give each other the benefit of the doubt? Assume that another poster has good intentions, even when posting different opinions. Our looonnnggg offseason is going to get even longer, and most of us value reasonable discourse.
    About as well thought out a post as I have read in a long time. Gives a good reference point. Thank you.

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