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2015 DIII Commitments

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  • elbojpb
    replied
    Requirements

    From the guide ....


    To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements:
    1. Complete 16 NCAA core courses:
    • Four years of English;
    • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher);
    • Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it);
    • Two years of social science;
    • One additional year of English, math or natural/ physical science; and
    • Four additional years of English, math, natural/ physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.
    2. Earn at least a 2.0 GPA in your core courses.
    3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale.

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  • bakdraft21
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Originally posted by CARDS_rule_the_Burgh View Post
    Basically, to get into DI or DII in any sport, you have to prove to the NCAA that you have completed a certain number of "Core Courses" in High School - and it is up to the High School counselors to certify ahead of time that a course meets the criteria - as well as maintaining a certain GPA (counting only the Core Courses) and have a minimum SAT and ACT Score. If the Eligibility Center - or "Clearinghouse" - finds you don't meet these standards than you are ineligible for DI or DII, but the Clearinghouse has no jurisdiction over DIII.

    It is common belief that this is how Erik Selleck ended up at Oswego, and it has been stated many times by the player himself that a miscommunication between Georgetown Prep and the NCAA regarding English credits is the reason Alex Ovechkin's childhood teammate Nikita Kashirsky ended up at Norwich.
    thanks for the info,not sure how these kids could not meet the requirements,even with some being a few yrs older than most freshman,I guess they wait until the last minute??
    Last edited by bakdraft21; 07-18-2015, 08:05 AM.

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  • CARDS_rule_the_Burgh
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishman'81 View Post
    A kid who's going to a D-1 or D-2 school has to have a GPA above 2.0 and have taken certain core courses. There may be more to it than that, IDK, but it's not really a tall order for most recruits IIRC. A much lower bar than the usual admission standards at the vast majority of colleges.
    A lower bar, for sure, but most colleges look at the overall GPA, while the NCAA looks only at Core Courses, so those 100s in art and gym don't count

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  • joecct
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Do D1 "student" athletes have to take 6 or 9 hours a semester to stay eligible?

    From the D1's that I have talked to, it's a job, not an education.

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  • NUProf
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Originally posted by bakdraft21 View Post
    Never understood the clearinghouse thing,anyone care to explain it?? I think it was the reason Erik Selleck wound up at Oswego??
    ,,

    There are certain standards, including SAT (or ACT) scores, high school GPA, and a profile of courses that must be on an athlete's record for them to be able to compete in DI/DII sports. The theory is that this guarantees they will be "student-athletes." The amazing thing is that some of the numbskull DI bounce ball and gladiator ball players can get through that. Often the course requirements trip them. If it's the SAT, they keep trying until they make it and the highest score counts. It's a big sham. In DIII all you have to do is meet the admissions standards and stay in school.

    I've seen NU athletes as "conditional admits" to Norwich required to pass courses in summer school to be admitted in the fall. I would assume that kids like that (if they were DI material) might have trouble with the clearinghouse, but maybe not. Athletic Factory ("Power Conference") schools object that it is expecting too much of their recruits to meet those standards.

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  • Hammer
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    This is nothing more than a complete WAG, but I'm guessing that this kid is missing a core class somewhere along the line. If he's not pulling a 2.0, or if his test scores are in the toilet, he's not long for any college anywhere.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishman'81
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Originally posted by bakdraft21 View Post
    Never understood the clearinghouse thing,anyone care to explain it?? I think it was the reason Erik Selleck wound up at Oswego??
    A kid who's going to a D-1 or D-2 school has to have a GPA above 2.0 and have taken certain core courses. There may be more to it than that, IDK, but it's not really a tall order for most recruits IIRC. A much lower bar than the usual admission standards at the vast majority of colleges.

    Leave a comment:


  • CARDS_rule_the_Burgh
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Originally posted by bakdraft21 View Post
    Never understood the clearinghouse thing,anyone care to explain it?? I think it was the reason Erik Selleck wound up at Oswego??
    Basically, to get into DI or DII in any sport, you have to prove to the NCAA that you have completed a certain number of "Core Courses" in High School - and it is up to the High School counselors to certify ahead of time that a course meets the criteria - as well as maintaining a certain GPA (counting only the Core Courses) and have a minimum SAT and ACT Score. If the Eligibility Center - or "Clearinghouse" - finds you don't meet these standards than you are ineligible for DI or DII, but the Clearinghouse has no jurisdiction over DIII.

    It is common belief that this is how Erik Selleck ended up at Oswego, and it has been stated many times by the player himself that a miscommunication between Georgetown Prep and the NCAA regarding English credits is the reason Alex Ovechkin's childhood teammate Nikita Kashirsky ended up at Norwich.

    Leave a comment:


  • bakdraft21
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    nice

    Leave a comment:


  • UWSP_Fan
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Originally posted by bakdraft21 View Post
    Karty should have joined his fellow Oklahoma player Jackson in Oswego, they could have carpooled
    He is joining fellow Oklahoma player in Kyle Sharkey at UWSP.

    Leave a comment:


  • bakdraft21
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Karty should have joined his fellow Oklahoma player Jackson in Oswego, they could have carpooled

    Leave a comment:


  • bakdraft21
    replied
    Re: ECAC/W Commitments

    Originally posted by Hammer View Post
    And if he can do that, even better.

    All the same, he'd better make sure he walks across that stage on Graduation Day. I don't think I'd put my chips on the NHL at this point.
    yes the degree is very important these days ,even as firefighter I needed a degree to get promoted,along with a few yrs of crazy reading/studying.

    Leave a comment:


  • bakdraft21
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Originally posted by Fishman'81 View Post
    Yes. I wonder if there was an issue with the clearinghouse.
    Never understood the clearinghouse thing,anyone care to explain it?? I think it was the reason Erik Selleck wound up at Oswego??

    Leave a comment:


  • bakdraft21
    replied
    Re: 2015 DIII Commitments

    Originally posted by BetterInLakePlacid View Post
    You barely see any USHL players at all going straight to D3. A leading scorer from a team is unheard of.
    yes agree

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  • Hammer
    replied
    Re: ECAC/W Commitments

    And if he can do that, even better.

    All the same, he'd better make sure he walks across that stage on Graduation Day. I don't think I'd put my chips on the NHL at this point.
    Last edited by Hammer; 07-17-2015, 06:17 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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