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UNH 2020 Off-Season Thread: That Rinky-Shrinky Thang And Other Lively Banter :D

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  • Chuck Murray
    replied
    Originally posted by HockeyRef View Post
    At least there's trips to Ireland.
    I can go for a golf trip to Ireland any time I want. For D-1 hockey, it's just a gimmick junket.

    I hope someday you get to experience the truly great moments of college hockey excitement, 'Ref. There's nothing quite like it, I still get shivers thinking about Saviano's goal in 2002 and Teplitsky's fluky goal in 2003 on the way to hardware in Boston.

    Getting to the 3rd period tied 1-1 with Minnesota in the 2003 Buffalo FF Finals another one ... lots of great Regional moments, Mowers in Albany in '98 and Haydar in Worcester in '99.

    They all seem just SO far away now, it's sad ...

    Leave a comment:


  • HockeyRef
    replied
    Originally posted by Chuck Murray View Post
    It's at this time of the year, this time of the D-1 college hockey season, where the downfall of UNH Hockey really hits home. This used to be a great time for traveling to Boston and beyond to see exciting, spirited and highly competitive hockey, along with having a home-town rooting interest. Will the 'Cats make it to Boston? How will they fare at the HE Tourney? Will they be selected for the big tourney, and if so (and not long ago, it usually wasn't an if), where will they be sent, and who will they be facing? Can they win a couple of tough games over a single weekend, and get to the Frozen Four?

    And getting to the FF, 4 out of 6 seasons around the turn of the century ... will they win it this time?

    This all used to be part of being a fan of UNH Hockey. It was great fun, at least while it lasted.

    It began to slowly slip away, piece by piece ... first, the trips to the FF became elusive. OK, but we're close, it takes some luck to get there, just keep qualifying, right? Then, getting to the HE Finals became more and more elusive ... but hey, we still usually qualify for the big tourney, right? And then, trips to Boston became less regular ... and finally, trips to the big tourney got less and less regular, until there were no more trips. Not to Regionals, and nowadays, not even to Boston.

    Hats off to Blue Skies + Infinity for the super fantastic "job" you've done in killing UNH's golden goose.

    Can you at least have the dignity of retiring ASAP before you wreck the rest of UNH Athletics?

    Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency???? ...
    Well Chuck you know my journey began at the last time we were at the Regional in Manchester. Still wonder if we would have won that game v UML if Goumas amd Downing had been in the line up but Connor Hellebucyk (sp) and Co. had other plans.

    Watching the games today and they are talking about the Gophers last trip to the NCAA's in 2003 and I don't have to tell you veterans who they beat...5-1 win over UNH. At least the 'Cats would continue to find their way as you said to at least the Garden or a Regional.

    So maybe we are a Michigan who will finally get back to greatness in the very near future? Laurels are great but as they say, you can't rest on 'em. Takes more than a bunch of complaining about rink size and other things which are nothing more than excuses the average fan can see right through..

    At least there's trips to Ireland.
    Last edited by HockeyRef; 03-27-2021, 04:17 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • HockeyRef
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott View Post

    Aww....thanks Snives!! :-)
    Happy to oblige...just wish we could have these convos in person standing with 11.00 (which I would gladly pay) Bud Lights (ha!) in our hands between periods at the TD...sigh.
    Last edited by HockeyRef; 03-27-2021, 02:03 PM.

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  • Scott
    replied
    Originally posted by Snively65 View Post
    Even with our new off-season thread started by Darius (thanks, Darius), these old threads live on, perhaps forever in the "new system.' But, after 1314 posts and 92,542 views, I just want to say thanks to Scott for starting this thread, and all of you folks who have posted here during this most challenging season. Thanks also to our players moving on, and best wishes to them in their future career paths.
    Aww....thanks Snives!! :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Chuck Murray
    replied
    It's at this time of the year, this time of the D-1 college hockey season, where the downfall of UNH Hockey really hits home. This used to be a great time for traveling to Boston and beyond to see exciting, spirited and highly competitive hockey, along with having a home-town rooting interest. Will the 'Cats make it to Boston? How will they fare at the HE Tourney? Will they be selected for the big tourney, and if so (and not long ago, it usually wasn't an if), where will they be sent, and who will they be facing? Can they win a couple of tough games over a single weekend, and get to the Frozen Four?

    And getting to the FF, 4 out of 6 seasons around the turn of the century ... will they win it this time?

    This all used to be part of being a fan of UNH Hockey. It was great fun, at least while it lasted.

    It began to slowly slip away, piece by piece ... first, the trips to the FF became elusive. OK, but we're close, it takes some luck to get there, just keep qualifying, right? Then, getting to the HE Finals became more and more elusive ... but hey, we still usually qualify for the big tourney, right? And then, trips to Boston became less regular ... and finally, trips to the big tourney got less and less regular, until there were no more trips. Not to Regionals, and nowadays, not even to Boston.

    Hats off to Blue Skies + Infinity for the super fantastic "job" you've done in killing UNH's golden goose.

    Can you at least have the dignity of retiring ASAP before you wreck the rest of UNH Athletics?

    Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency???? ...

    Leave a comment:


  • Snively65
    replied
    Even with our new off-season thread started by Darius (thanks, Darius), these old threads live on, perhaps forever in the "new system.' But, after 1314 posts and 92,542 views, I just want to say thanks to Scott for starting this thread, and all of you folks who have posted here during this most challenging season. Thanks also to our players moving on, and best wishes to them in their future career paths.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan
    replied
    I also have no interest in rehashing any debates, but my problem with past goalies has been getting beaten when squared up to shooters, on long range shots, or when playing themselves out of position. More recently they’ve been at the goal mouth, by opponents in alone, on one timers or back door plays...

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pKbFmh99bQQ

    At that point it becomes about bigger issues than save percentage.

    Leave a comment:


  • Darius
    replied
    https://fanforum.uscho.com/forum/col...thread-finally

    Leave a comment:


  • Chuck Murray
    replied
    Originally posted by Snively65 View Post
    Watcher and Chuck are on a roll with goalie talk, so I think no need to distract with SOG (or FOW) just yet, HR. :-)
    You guys can and should add whatever you want, any time you want, Snives.

    Please just avoid Corsi and Fenwick though ... :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • HockeyRef
    replied
    Originally posted by Snively65 View Post

    Watcher and Chuck are on a roll with goalie talk, so I think no need to distract with SOG (or FOW) just yet, HR. :-)
    I do what I can....

    Leave a comment:


  • Snively65
    replied
    Originally posted by HockeyRef View Post

    Worse than SOG's?
    Watcher and Chuck are on a roll with goalie talk, so I think no need to distract with SOG (or FOW) just yet, HR. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Chuck Murray
    replied
    Originally posted by NCAA watcher View Post
    Because the game has devolved into pinball where deflections and clogging the netfront means making saves is more random than a skill. And so being a goalie means staying in the position most likely to block a deflection -- percentages. Stay centered, take up the most space, and hope the puck hits you. The larger you are, the more likely it is to hit you.

    Playing goalie is less random the more time and space there is. At lowest levels, players have lots of time and so playing goalie is the one-on-one challenge you like. At more competitive levels like even college, players can buy time and space, but even there, a lot of goals are "throw the puck at the net and hope it deflects in." The proverbial "create traffic and get pucks on net" mindset.

    To me, the solution is not to make the net bigger. Yes, a few more deflections will get goals, but that still doesn't accentuate talent -- it's still random but the success rate of the random distribution is slightly higher. The solution is to create more space so players get greater looks at the net, and goalies have more movement. Take one skater away on each side and make the game 4 X4.

    And its not just because it showcases skill, but it means as a fan, it means the "better" team is more likely to win, rather than have a low-scoring slog fest in which you can lose a game due to a fluke deflection.
    There's so much in your post that I agree with, 'Watcher. Making the ice surface bigger and/or reducing the amount of players on the ice at the same time, yes - sign me up. But as you know, the challenging logistics of retrofitting arenas to adjust to larger surfaces, and the pressure from the financial sides for less seats AND less players means none of this is likely going to happen in our lifetimes. On arena retrofits, realize this ... with all the crap UNH has encountered with plans to change the size of The Whitt's ice surface ... that would be a relatively easy one, compared to NHL arenas. Only if the sport goes down the tubes would urgency be created to force those issues through all of the resistance they're likely to encounter.

    The reason you make the net bigger is to get the GD goalies off their knees, and force them to be athletes on par with the rest of the guys on the ice. Many of them play on their knees because their body frame (knees to shoulder) fits snugly under the crossbar. So raise the crossbar then, from 4 ft. to 5 ft., and see how it works. Worst case, widen the goal from 6 ft. to 7 ft.

    I still think you can differentiate truly skilled goalies and net-fillers based on what they do with their arms. I would definitely pare down the catcher, there's really no good excuse for it being as big as it is these days ... but even with those ginormous catchers in use today, there are many goalies who really don't know how to catch. Everyone has been so drilled to take away the lower half of the goal, and using your glove or blocker to cover the corners has become an afterthought, with way too many goalies and their coaches willing to concede the top corners. Many goalies never so much as use their catchers, as opposed to having shooters "find" their catchers for them with lower shots maybe a foot or two off the ice.

    I've never run any kind of a study on shot locations or qualities, but my operating assumption is that pretty much any goalie with a modicum of positional sense - as it is taught in this era of net-fillers - should be able to carry an .880-.890 save pct. as pretty much the baseline. Decent goalies at a given level should be at .900 or a little over, and above-average goalies who can cover areas the net-fillers can't tend to come in at .910-.920. The truly gifted ones come in at .930 (and to support your earlier point, they probably have an above-average defensive team playing in front of them too).

    If folks recoil at the additional offense that might be created by increasing the size of the goal, hey ... look at the 1980's NHL there was a lot of great hockey being played back then, lots of goals, lots of wide-open play, and lots of excitement. We're not likely to get back there anytime soon with just improving player skills - heck, players have never been more skilled than they are today - so you have to nibble at the edges. Ice size and 4 x 4 per you, and making goalies' jobs more challenging per me (and I used to pretend to be a goalie!). The balance of the game has been steadily trending away from offense for several decades now, it's gone too far in one direction, and it's time to pull things back to seek a more entertaining balance.

    JMHO.

    Leave a comment:


  • NCAA watcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Chuck Murray View Post
    It's why I come on here from time to time to advocate for raising the crossbar. Goalies sliding back and forth on their knees all game long is just a bad look for a great game. Everyone else on the ice needs to be a supreme athlete. Why give goalies with mass but marginal shot-stopping talent a pass?
    Because the game has devolved into pinball where deflections and clogging the netfront means making saves is more random than a skill. And so being a goalie means staying in the position most likely to block a deflection -- percentages. Stay centered, take up the most space, and hope the puck hits you. The larger you are, the more likely it is to hit you.

    Playing goalie is less random the more time and space there is. At lowest levels, players have lots of time and so playing goalie is the one-on-one challenge you like. At more competitive levels like even college, players can buy time and space, but even there, a lot of goals are "throw the puck at the net and hope it deflects in." The proverbial "create traffic and get pucks on net" mindset.

    To me, the solution is not to make the net bigger. Yes, a few more deflections will get goals, but that still doesn't accentuate talent -- it's still random but the success rate of the random distribution is slightly higher. The solution is to create more space so players get greater looks at the net, and goalies have more movement. Take one skater away on each side and make the game 4 X4.

    And its not just because it showcases skill, but it means as a fan, it means the "better" team is more likely to win, rather than have a low-scoring slog fest in which you can lose a game due to a fluke deflection.

    Leave a comment:


  • HockeyRef
    replied
    Originally posted by Chuck Murray View Post

    I think that's an oversimplification, 'Watcher. You can argue the best team defenses prevent a lot of shots altogether, but at some point, your goalie is gonna be called upon to make saves. I'll agree with you, some credit should reflect on the team's defense - and that's every bit the 3 guys up front as the 2 guys at the back, all doing their jobs - but some credit also has to go to the last line of defense.

    Some goalies are just better than others. In this age where guys like Ben Bishop can get the job done (to a degree) by his sheer mass and blocking space/angles with a limited amount of athleticism, he'll never be a Jonathan Quick or Dominic Hasek, who both succeeded with otherworldly agility. And they've got the rings to show for it.

    I hate what the stats nerds have done in other sports, and I don't want to see that happen to hockey. Net-fillers are the worst advertisement for what is otherwise arguably the most athletically demanding team sport in the world. But they've intruded and proliferated, mostly due to stats-driven mindsets, and it's a scar on an otherwise beautiful game. It's why I come on here from time to time to advocate for raising the crossbar. Goalies sliding back and forth on their knees all game long is just a bad look for a great game. Everyone else on the ice needs to be a supreme athlete. Why give goalies with mass but marginal shot-stopping talent a pass?

    Sorry, I get this way when goalies' performances become an issue. Sore spot, but it is what it is. :-)
    Worse than SOG's?

    Leave a comment:


  • Chuck Murray
    replied
    Originally posted by NCAA watcher View Post
    Save percentage is a team stat, not a goalie stat. Good shots yield low save percentage, good defense yield high percentage. Otherwise, Jeff Pietrasiak is one of the UNH all time best.
    I think that's an oversimplification, 'Watcher. You can argue the best team defenses prevent a lot of shots altogether, but at some point, your goalie is gonna be called upon to make saves. I'll agree with you, some credit should reflect on the team's defense - and that's every bit the 3 guys up front as the 2 guys at the back, all doing their jobs - but some credit also has to go to the last line of defense.

    Some goalies are just better than others. In this age where guys like Ben Bishop can get the job done (to a degree) by his sheer mass and blocking space/angles with a limited amount of athleticism, he'll never be a Jonathan Quick or Dominic Hasek, who both succeeded with otherworldly agility. And they've got the rings to show for it.

    I hate what the stats nerds have done in other sports, and I don't want to see that happen to hockey. Net-fillers are the worst advertisement for what is otherwise arguably the most athletically demanding team sport in the world. But they've intruded and proliferated, mostly due to stats-driven mindsets, and it's a scar on an otherwise beautiful game. It's why I come on here from time to time to advocate for raising the crossbar. Goalies sliding back and forth on their knees all game long is just a bad look for a great game. Everyone else on the ice needs to be a supreme athlete. Why give goalies with mass but marginal shot-stopping talent a pass?

    Sorry, I get this way when goalies' performances become an issue. Sore spot, but it is what it is. :-)

    Leave a comment:

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