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How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

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  • WeAreNDHockey
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by TigerFan86-87 View Post
    Except for the non-warm-weather-sites that have begun hosting bowls in recent years (i.e. Boise, ID and Yankee Stadium, NY). Kind of like the "Valley Forge Bowl" (reference sure to age me).
    If the Brits did not insist on playing the U.K. version of that Tampa 2 defense they may have prevailed in the Valley Forge bowl back in the 18th century. They just didn't have a quick enough middle linebacker to effectively drop into a deep coverage when needed.

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  • TigerFan86-87
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by WeAreNDHockey View Post
    ...because they treat it as a year-end bonus for athletic department personnel.
    Except for the non-warm-weather-sites that have begun hosting bowls in recent years (i.e. Boise, ID and Yankee Stadium, NY). Kind of like the "Valley Forge Bowl" (reference sure to age me).

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  • WeAreNDHockey
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by TigerFan86-87 View Post
    That's exactly what is happening. They've got to slow the increase or it is only going to get worse.


    I think the schools' athletic departments have to pay for travel and lodging. I remember years ago reading in a publication about ND football (when they were still completely independent) that they might turn down lower level bowl games because the cost of getting and keeping the team there was more than the bowl would pay the schools to be there. It wouldn't surprise me at all if the NCAA wasn't paying for anything on behalf of the teams.
    The NCAA covers the cost of travel to and from NCAA tournaments. One of the "perks" of being in the NCAA I guess. They pay for the plane/bus travel for a predetermined number in your party, lodging and provide tickets to the players families.

    The bowls are largely free of NCAA interference and teams invited make their own arrangements. Before the "New Years Six, and the 4 team "bowl" playoff all of them were free agents as far as that was concerned. Teams lose money on a lot of the bowl games nowadays and not just lower level games. Of course in the last 15 years or so with the advent of too many bowls and a sort of playoff, almost all of the bowls seem to be that now. Top tier football schools make so much money today over the course of a season (TV revenue, conference payouts, ticket revenue, merchandise sales) most are willing to lose a million dollars or more on a bowl trip (spend $4 million, payout of $3 million) because they treat it as a year-end bonus for athletic department personnel. Nearly every power 5 conference team and Notre Dame take 100s of people on the bowl trip, in addition to the bloated traveling staff of any college football team.

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  • TigerFan86-87
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by FlagDUDE08 View Post
    So long as people are willing to pay it, that's what the price will be. You won't see a price decrease unless people just flat out don't attend.
    That's exactly what is happening. They've got to slow the increase or it is only going to get worse.

    Originally posted by FlagDUDE08 View Post
    Also remember that it has to cover to costs of getting the teams there, as well as getting the teams to the regionals since I highly doubt any of those are profitable.
    I think the schools' athletic departments have to pay for travel and lodging. I remember years ago reading in a publication about ND football (when they were still completely independent) that they might turn down lower level bowl games because the cost of getting and keeping the team there was more than the bowl would pay the schools to be there. It wouldn't surprise me at all if the NCAA wasn't paying for anything on behalf of the teams.

    Leave a comment:


  • UMICH
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by Sean Pickett View Post
    This has been talked about for decades. Here are the all-session prices that I know of since 1976 (pre-1990 price includes consolation game)
    1976 - 13.50

    1980 - 24.00

    1982 - 25.00

    1986 - 36.00

    1988 - 33.00

    1990 - 50.00
    1991 - 65.00
    1992
    1993 - 60.00
    1994 - 65.00
    1995 - 75.00
    1996 - 69.50
    1997 - 75.00
    1998 - 90.00 - 75.00
    1999 - 90.00
    2000 - 110.00
    2001 - 85.00
    2002 - 124.50
    2003 - 120.00
    2004 - 135.00
    2005 - 144.00
    2006 - 150.00
    2007 - 155.00
    2008 - 164.00
    2009 - 177.00
    2010 - 189.00 - 119.00 - 75.00 - 40.00
    2011 - 195.00
    2012 - 195.00
    2013 - 200.00
    2014 - 230.00 - 205.00 - 500.00
    2015 - 250.00 - 205.00 - 160.00 - 600.00
    2016 - 260.00 - 240.00 - 205.00 - 160.00 - 600.00 - 450.00
    2017 - 290.00 - 280.00 - 175.00 - 650.00 - 475.00

    As I recall the $450-$650 tickets are for first/second row seats on the ice. As can be seen I'm missing several years, including this year. If anyone has that information I would appreciate your sending it to me to add to my spreadsheet.

    Sean
    This years all-session ticket was $295 in the school allotment (lower bowl, corner- I was in row 11). That's all I got.

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  • Sean Pickett
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by WeAreNDHockey View Post
    I paid around $170 I believe for FF tickets in 2008. The last two years seats in the lower bowl were nearly $300. Figuring for inflation, those tickets should go for around $200 now. My tickets for 2011 were right around $200... What has changed is ticket prices.
    This has been talked about for decades. Here are the all-session prices that I know of since 1976 (pre-1990 price includes consolation game)
    1976 - 13.50

    1980 - 24.00

    1982 - 25.00

    1986 - 36.00

    1988 - 33.00

    1990 - 50.00
    1991 - 65.00
    1992
    1993 - 60.00
    1994 - 65.00
    1995 - 75.00
    1996 - 69.50
    1997 - 75.00
    1998 - 90.00 - 75.00
    1999 - 90.00
    2000 - 110.00
    2001 - 85.00
    2002 - 124.50
    2003 - 120.00
    2004 - 135.00
    2005 - 144.00
    2006 - 150.00
    2007 - 155.00
    2008 - 164.00
    2009 - 177.00
    2010 - 189.00 - 119.00 - 75.00 - 40.00
    2011 - 195.00
    2012 - 195.00
    2013 - 200.00
    2014 - 230.00 - 205.00 - 500.00
    2015 - 250.00 - 205.00 - 160.00 - 600.00
    2016 - 260.00 - 240.00 - 205.00 - 160.00 - 600.00 - 450.00
    2017 - 290.00 - 280.00 - 175.00 - 650.00 - 475.00

    As I recall the $450-$650 tickets are for first/second row seats on the ice. As can be seen I'm missing several years, including this year. If anyone has that information I would appreciate your sending it to me to add to my spreadsheet.

    Sean

    Leave a comment:


  • FlagDUDE08
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by WeAreNDHockey View Post
    I paid around $170 I believe for FF tickets in 2008. The last two years seats in the lower bowl were nearly $300. Figuring for inflation, those tickets should go for around $200 now. My tickets for 2011 were right around $200.

    Figuring that demand has lessened somewhat, it's sad that the NC$$ has decided to use overpricing as a way to maximize revenue. Obviously they bring in more money by selling 10,000 or so tickets at $300 than by selling 12,000 at $200, but it seems with a couple of thousand empty seats, that price point is clearly too high. The science is guessing what the number is that will prevent someone from buying a ticket who otherwise would. They also have a target amount that each ticketholder spends in the facility for food and other extras, so the empty seats represent not only lost ticket revenue, but likely tens of thousands in secondary revenue. Sellouts also lead to people making a quicker purchase the next time, so they might have your $$$ for 6 months before they have to spend it on putting on the event.

    I am actually surprised the FF wasn't sold completely out. The 18303 listed for the final was nearly 1000 fewer than when ND played in the 2011 FF there. Same two teams, bigger stage (final, versus semi-final). What has changed is ticket prices.
    So long as people are willing to pay it, that's what the price will be. You won't see a price decrease unless people just flat out don't attend. Also remember that it has to cover to costs of getting the teams there, as well as getting the teams to the regionals since I highly doubt any of those are profitable.

    Leave a comment:


  • WeAreNDHockey
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by TigerFan86-87 View Post
    Pretty good??? In the State of Hockey?
    Back in the day (not all that long ago), we all knew that the FFs held in Boston and St. Paul were automatic sellouts mere hours after the ticket lotteries began. The distance to the campuses of the participants had nothing to do with whether it sold out or not, just how easy (or not) it would be to get tickets on the secondary market. Now they have over 6 months and can't even sell out anywhere, even St. Paul and Boston. Maybe the beer will start to bring some fans back, but probably not. They really need to think about the ticket price levels. I think they've gone beyond the saturation point. People are now finally making choices of whether or not to go based on the price, which didn't used to happen much.
    I paid around $170 I believe for FF tickets in 2008. The last two years seats in the lower bowl were nearly $300. Figuring for inflation, those tickets should go for around $200 now. My tickets for 2011 were right around $200.

    Figuring that demand has lessened somewhat, it's sad that the NC$$ has decided to use overpricing as a way to maximize revenue. Obviously they bring in more money by selling 10,000 or so tickets at $300 than by selling 12,000 at $200, but it seems with a couple of thousand empty seats, that price point is clearly too high. The science is guessing what the number is that will prevent someone from buying a ticket who otherwise would. They also have a target amount that each ticketholder spends in the facility for food and other extras, so the empty seats represent not only lost ticket revenue, but likely tens of thousands in secondary revenue. Sellouts also lead to people making a quicker purchase the next time, so they might have your $$$ for 6 months before they have to spend it on putting on the event.

    I am actually surprised the FF wasn't sold completely out. The 18303 listed for the final was nearly 1000 fewer than when ND played in the 2011 FF there. Same two teams, bigger stage (final, versus semi-final). What has changed is ticket prices.

    Leave a comment:


  • TigerFan86-87
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by D2D View Post
    It came close to a sellout. 18,026 for the two semi's and 18,303 for the final. Pretty good considering the closest team there was located 150 miles away, and the other three considerably further.
    Pretty good??? In the State of Hockey?
    Back in the day (not all that long ago), we all knew that the FFs held in Boston and St. Paul were automatic sellouts mere hours after the ticket lotteries began. The distance to the campuses of the participants had nothing to do with whether it sold out or not, just how easy (or not) it would be to get tickets on the secondary market. Now they have over 6 months and can't even sell out anywhere, even St. Paul and Boston. Maybe the beer will start to bring some fans back, but probably not. They really need to think about the ticket price levels. I think they've gone beyond the saturation point. People are now finally making choices of whether or not to go based on the price, which didn't used to happen much.

    Leave a comment:


  • ND Hockey
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    The restriction on alcohol sales has been officially rescinded. We can now expect to see beer sales at the regionals next year in addition to the Frozen Four.

    In addition to the recruiting model, the Council eliminated restrictions on the sale of alcohol at Division I championships. The decision comes nearly two years after a pilot program that allowed alcohol sales in general seating at the College World Series and Women’s College World Series expanded to include the Football Championship Subdivision’s championship game, wrestling, men’s lacrosse championships in all three divisions, men's ice hockey and women's volleyball.

    http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/...ng-legislation

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  • D2D
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by Brenthoven View Post
    http://www.mshsl.org/mshsl/upload/MS...rds%202015.pdf
    On Friday evening, the 21,609 is a new record for the largest crowd to ever attend an indoor
    hockey game in the state of Minnesota

    Just putting it out there.
    Bear in mind that on Friday night at the Boy's State Tournament they sell tickets for some seats twice, mostly as the result of students leaving after their teams' games are over and new ones for the second game arrive.

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  • Tater
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by D2D View Post
    Official attendance is usually announced at around 19,200 and change. We'll see what they announce for tonight's game, which the Wild just won 6-2.
    Tonight's attendance was listed as 19,175.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Rube
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by D2D View Post
    Official attendance is usually announced at around 19,200 and change. We'll see what they announce for tonight's game, which the Wild just won 6-2. I'll be there tomorrow night, hoping they can tie and extend the series to at least six games...the Jets are for real!
    http://www.mshsl.org/mshsl/upload/MS...rds%202015.pdf
    On Friday evening, the 21,609 is a new record for the largest crowd to ever attend an indoor
    hockey game in the state of Minnesota

    Just putting it out there.

    Leave a comment:


  • D2D
    replied
    Re: How were they aable to serve beer in St. Paul?

    Originally posted by Greg Ambrose View Post
    With SRO, the Wild pack in close to 22,000. So not close.
    Official attendance is usually announced at around 19,200 and change. We'll see what they announce for tonight's game, which the Wild just won 6-2. I'll be there tomorrow night, hoping they can tie and extend the series to at least six games...the Jets are for real!

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg Ambrose
    replied
    Originally posted by D2D View Post
    It came close to a sellout. 18,026 for the two semi's and 18,303 for the final. Pretty good considering the closest team there was located 150 miles away, and the other three considerably further.
    With SRO, the Wild pack in close to 22,000. So not close.

    Leave a comment:

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