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LTsatch
07-30-2014, 09:32 PM
I am sure ACE tickets will have first choice of the best seats. Talk about a company going from the street to the boardroom!

LTsatch
07-30-2014, 09:41 PM
Just did a quick search and you can buy overpriced hospitality and 2015 Frozen Four tickets today, over $500 for the cheapest all session package. http://www.primesport.com/d/ncaa-mens-frozen-four

ND Hockey
08-02-2014, 11:36 AM
Is there a certain way to buy that will start the accumulation of priority points? I'm finally at the point in my life where I can afford to make the Frozen Four at least every other year or so. I know demand is fairly low right now, but I can envision it starting to pick up again, especially with Boston and Saint Paul coming up in the next few years.

CLS
08-02-2014, 11:46 AM
Is there a certain way to buy that will start the accumulation of priority points? I'm finally at the point in my life where I can afford to make the Frozen Four at least every other year or so. I know demand is fairly low right now, but I can envision it starting to pick up again, especially with Boston and Saint Paul coming up in the next few years.General rule: buy them through the NCAA (or the venue directly if you need special accommodations, like handicapped seating), not through the secondary market. The person who buys them from the NCAA gets the priority points.

Bonin21
08-02-2014, 12:19 PM
But after a while if they aren't sold out the NCAA will release them to the venue. Still at face value, but you don't get your point. This happened to me this year.

PcFriars13
08-02-2014, 03:11 PM
I paid 61 for tickets to just the semis in Philly.

pgb-ohio
08-04-2014, 04:13 PM
Is there a certain way to buy that will start the accumulation of priority points? I'm finally at the point in my life where I can afford to make the Frozen Four at least every other year or so. I know demand is fairly low right now, but I can envision it starting to pick up again, especially with Boston and Saint Paul coming up in the next few years.


General rule: buy them through the NCAA (or the venue directly if you need special accommodations, like handicapped seating), not through the secondary market. The person who buys them from the NCAA gets the priority points.And unlike many "season ticket" systems, you don't get sent to the end of the line for missing a year. You keep the priority points earned. Skipping a year just means you don't earn a point for that particular year. Sounds like ND Hockey will find that feature helpful.

Another nuance to be aware of is that you do NOT have to order the full set of four tickets to earn a priority point. Even purchasing a single is sufficient. This is very helpful if the number of ducats you need varies from year-to-year. Need three tickets this year, four tickets next year, but only two tickets the year after? No worries, it's all good. You'll earn the priority point in each of the three years.


But after a while if they aren't sold out the NCAA will release them to the venue. Still at face value, but you don't get your point. This happened to me this year.In other words, at some point the "lottery" closes, even if tickets remain. Most of us who follow this closely have our tickets long before the end of the lottery, so we don't pay much attention to the closing date. Also, I don't recall the closing date being publicized. I'll try to take note of that this year and post the info when I get it. Or, if someone beats me to the punch, so much the better.

Bonin21
08-04-2014, 04:18 PM
In other words, at some point the "lottery" closes, even if tickets remain. Most of us who follow this closely have our tickets long before the end of the lottery, so we don't pay much attention to the closing date. Also, I don't recall the closing date being publicized. I'll try to take note of that this year and post the info when I get it. Or, if someone beats me to the punch, so much the better.
By waiting, I ended up with WAY, WAY better seats than I was set to get in the lottery. I provided this feedback in the survey as it's hard to trust you're truly getting the "best available" when that happens.

CLS
08-04-2014, 05:03 PM
... Even purchasing a single is sufficient. This is very helpful if the number of ducats you need varies from year-to-year. Need three tickets this year, four tickets next year, but only two tickets the year after? ...Or the NCAA does something silly and puts the FF in a football stadium and you don't want to go but want the priority point? :mad::p(Didn't do that, because I didn't think it would be necessary, but the thought crossed my mind).


By waiting, I ended up with WAY, WAY better seats than I was set to get in the lottery. I provided this feedback in the survey as it's hard to trust you're truly getting the "best available" when that happens.Hmmmm interesting. When I bought tickets to Pittsburgh, I selected my own seats and was quite happy with them. Didn't do that for Philly because we needed special seating arrangements, but I assumed it would be the same way for Philly. "Best available" is in the eye of the beholder. Some folks in Pittsburgh had what looked like great seats on the seating chart, but were behind the students, who stood the whole game. I'd understand it if you bought the tickets on the secondary market, because then you'd probably have gotten seats that were purchased by a person with a lot of priority points or that been held back for the NCAA. I guess it's still possible that the NCAA turned some tickets back to the venue, but in general, but in general, that shouldn't have happened.

Bonin21
08-04-2014, 05:32 PM
I'm a priority 1, so during the lottery most of what was left was in the nosebleeds. In the spring I watched as more and more seats started to open up, and I ended up in a club box. People/orgs/schools must have been backing out on tickets.

Priceless
08-04-2014, 05:47 PM
Yeah, I'm a priority 1 but haven't bothered getting tickets through the NCAA because I'll either buy them on the secondary market or go in with others for a suite. I might get tickets this time just to be safe. Then I can sell those if I get better seats.

pgb-ohio
08-05-2014, 01:29 AM
...I guess it's still possible that the NCAA turned some tickets back to the venue, but in general, but in general, that shouldn't have happened.Possible, and it appears to be happening -- both now and back in the day. Do you remember how we used to identify the poster or posters who "won" the lottery? Typically a small handful of posters got dramatically better seats than everybody else. In other words, they were assigned to widely scattered seats, in sections far more desirable than the rest of us received. It was always my belief that those tickets were returned by insiders who weren't able to use them.

In the earlier years, we didn't get our seat assignments until shortly before the tournament. That opened up the possibility that returned tickets might have been placed "on top of the pile" when it came time to do the seat assignments. But now that we select specific seats during the previous October, that possibility is all but eliminated for lottery participants.

It's quite interesting to learn that the ticket returns may still be happening, and that such seats are ending up with those who are patient enough and persistent enough to keep checking in with the box office on a periodic basis. Now for Boston, this would certainly be a high risk, high reward strategy. But in a more typical year, the reduced risk just might make this approach a very attractive option.


...In the spring I watched as more and more seats started to open up, and I ended up in a club box. People/orgs/schools must have been backing out on tickets.Most likely individuals in the NCAA's own allotment, though possibly corporate friends. Returns from the participating schools, if any, wouldn't be available until the last minute.

Also, I'm going to suggest that those taking the time to return such tickets to circulation are Good Samaritans, not people who are guilty of "backing out." I doubt you intended any insult. But I do want to emphasize that when an insider goes to extra trouble to get unneeded great seats into the hands of ordinary fans, that behavior is both unselfish and commendable.

Point: With all that said, it's also possible that unsold premium seating is being quietly reclassified as regular seating as that year's tournament draws nearer.

pgb-ohio
08-13-2014, 07:08 AM
But after a while if they aren't sold out the NCAA will release them to the venue. Still at face value, but you don't get your point. This happened to me this year.


In other words, at some point the "lottery" closes, even if tickets remain. Most of us who follow this closely have our tickets long before the end of the lottery, so we don't pay much attention to the closing date. Also, I don't recall the closing date being publicized. I'll try to take note of that this year and post the info when I get it. Or, if someone beats me to the punch, so much the better.From this morning's e-mail, sent by the NCAA:

Ticket orders will be accepted until 11:59 PM Eastern Time, Friday, November 28, or until the available inventory is sold out, whichever occurs first.

Priceless
08-13-2014, 10:09 AM
From this morning's e-mail, sent by the NCAA:

Ticket orders will be accepted until 11:59 PM Eastern Time, Friday, November 28, or until the available inventory is sold out, whichever occurs first.

Sale starts September 26. I am priority level 1 so my date is November 5. So the first five weeks are priority followed by three weeks of the general public.

BostonSoccerDad
08-13-2014, 10:38 AM
Sale starts September 26. I am priority level 1 so my date is November 5. So the first five weeks are priority followed by three weeks of the general public.
I assume that this method of ticket sales (ticket sales dates assigned by priority levels) is meant as a way to reward fans who regularly attend the FF. Having never attended a FF, I think this method is fine and justifiable and recognize that I will have queue to the end of the line to get tickets.

My question: does this method dissuade scalpers? Or does it encourage them to open up several NCAA accounts and purchase tickets year after year achieving the higher priority levels to get the best tickets. And then inadvertently reducing the opportunity of the "real fan" to purchase tickets from the primary market.

pgb-ohio
08-13-2014, 10:47 AM
So it looks like tickets will go on sale to new buyers on approximately Friday, November 7th.

There is an opportunity to sign up for an NCAA newsletter with updates on the ticket process. See http://www.ncaa.com/newsletter-signup/icehockeym. Presumably that newsletter will provide the exact date and time.

My recommendation for new buyers would be to plan on purchasing during the three week window in November, preferably at the beginning of that window. Clearly demand for FF tickets "ain't what it used to be." But given that we're back in Boston for the first time in a decade, there's an excellent chance that the public allotment will be sold out during the lottery process. IMHO.

pgb-ohio
08-13-2014, 11:10 AM
My question: does this method dissuade scalpers? Or does it encourage them to open up several NCAA accounts and purchase tickets year after year achieving the higher priority levels to get the best tickets. And then inadvertently reducing the opportunity of the "real fan" to purchase tickets from the primary market.In the early years of the current system, this did happen. But the scalpers & speculators are long gone. Why? The selection of a series of non-traditional cities as FF Hosts has leveled off ticket demand considerably.

The typical FF is no longer a tough ticket. Recent FFs have been near-sellouts, but buyers haven't been turned away. Tickets certainly change hands on the secondary market, but typically at face value -- or less. 2015 Boston could prove to be a tough ticket, and we might see a temporary return of the scalpers. But it's highly unlikely they'll have gotten their tickets with priority points. Scalpers can't really game the system if they can only make money once every five years or so. Four years of break even or worse, for the chance at one profitable year? The numbers just don't work.

BostonSoccerDad
08-13-2014, 09:41 PM
In the early years of the current system, this did happen. But the scalpers & speculators are long gone. Why? The selection of a series of non-traditional cities as FF Hosts has leveled off ticket demand considerably.

The typical FF is no longer a tough ticket. Recent FFs have been near-sellouts, but buyers haven't been turned away. Tickets certainly change hands on the secondary market, but typically at face value -- or less. 2015 Boston could prove to be a tough ticket, and we might see a temporary return of the scalpers. But it's highly unlikely they'll have gotten their tickets with priority points. Scalpers can't really game the system if they can only make money once every five years or so. Four years of break even or worse, for the chance at one profitable year? The numbers just don't work.

Makes sense.


My recommendation for new buyers would be to plan on purchasing during the three week window in November, preferably at the beginning of that window. Clearly demand for FF tickets "ain't what it used to be." But given that we're back in Boston for the first time in a decade, there's an excellent chance that the public allotment will be sold out during the lottery process. IMHO.

Thanks - this is what I will be doing. Or heading out to the secondary market. :-)

CLS
08-13-2014, 10:26 PM
In the early years of the current system, this did happen. But the scalpers & speculators are long gone. Why? The selection of a series of non-traditional cities as FF Hosts has leveled off ticket demand considerably.
...
... and non-traditional venues (Ford Field) and bad luck (combination of Columbus -- a non-traditional city -- and four schools -- three of which have passionate, but small fan bases -- that were a loooonggg way from Columbus).

BC/HE
08-17-2014, 06:22 PM
Here is the list of dates each priority gets to order. Also note that November 7 is the date those without priority can order but they must register with NCAA.com to order. It does not open to the general public until December 9th after those who register get the chance between November 7th and 28th.

http://www.ncaa.com/championships/icehockey-men/d1/tickets-hospitality


Priority 18

Sept. 26, 2014


Priority 17

Sept. 29, 2014


Priority 16

Oct. 1, 2014


Priority 15

Oct. 3, 2014


Priority 14

Oct. 6, 2014


Priority 13

Oct. 8, 2014


Priority 12

Oct. 10, 2014


Priority 11

Oct. 13, 2014


Priority 10

Oct. 15, 2014


Priority 9

Oct. 17, 2014


Priority 8

Oct. 20, 2014


Priority 7

Oct. 22, 2014


Priority 6

Oct. 24, 2014


Priority 5

Oct. 27, 2014


Priority 4

Oct. 29, 2014


Priority 3

Oct. 31, 2014


Priority 2

Nov. 3, 2014


Priority 1

Nov. 5, 2014


*NCAA.com Registrants*

Nov. 7, 2014